University of Guelph study uncovers cause of pesticide exposure, Parkinson’s link

Public Release: 23-May-2018 Professor Scott Ryan has determined that low-level exposure to the pesticides disrupts cells in a way that mimics the effects of mutations known to cause Parkinson’s disease University of Guelph A new University of Guelph study has discovered why exposure to pesticides increases some people’s risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. Previous studies…

What happens if pesticides and herbicides stop working?

Public Release: 17-May-2018 What happens if we run out? Pesticide resistance needs attention, large-scale study North Carolina State University IMAGE: For new answers to the problems of increased pesticide resistance, landscape-level study is needed, NC State researchers say. Credit: Roger Winstead, NC State University To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining…

Earth’s orbital changes have influenced climate, life forms for at least 215 million years

Public Release: 7-May-2018 Gravity of Jupiter and Venus elongates Earth’s orbit every 405,000 years, Rutgers-led study confirms Rutgers University Caption Rutgers University-New Brunswick Professor Dennis Kent with part of a 1,700-foot-long rock core through the Chinle Formation in Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona. The background includes boxed archives of cores from the Newark basin…

Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humans

Public Release: 26-Apr-2018   An INRS team publishes the first-ever in vitro study demonstrating the potential effects of these pesticides on human health in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives Institut national de la recherche scientifique – INRS Neonicotinoids are currently the most widely used pesticides in the world and frequently make headlines because of their…

90 percent of pregnant women may have detectable levels of herbicides

Public Release: 22-Mar-2018 Study finds direct evidence of exposure of pregnant women to herbicide ingredient Indiana University INDIANAPOLIS — The first birth cohort study of its kind has found more than 90 percent of a group of pregnant women in Central Indiana had detectable levels of glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, the most heavily…

Wolovick: Geoengineering polar glaciers to slow sea-level rise

Public Release: 19-Mar-2018   A Princeton University researcher suggests a radical solution to prevent catastrophic glacial melting. Princeton University Targeted geoengineering to preserve continental ice sheets deserves serious research and investment, argues an international team of researchers in a Comment published March 14 in the journal Nature. Without intervention, by 2100 most large coastal cities…

Some black holes erase your past

Public Release: 20-Feb-2018   Einstein’s equations allow a non-determinist future inside some black holes University of California – Berkeley Caption A spacetime diagram of the gravitational collapse of a charged spherical star to form a charged black hole. An observer traveling across the event horizon will eventually encounter the Cauchy horizon, the boundary of the…

Medical care for wounded ants

Public Release: 13-Feb-2018   University of Würzburg The African Matabele ants (Megaponera analis) tend to the wounds of their injured comrades. And they do so rather successfully: Without such attendance, 80 percent of the injured ants die; after receiving “medical” treatment, only 10 percent succumb to their injuries. Erik T. Frank, Marten Wehrhan and Karl…

Herbicides now resulting in catastrophic failures

Public Release: 12-Feb-2018 Weeds out of control Spraying weeds with chemicals has always been costly. Now it is costly and ineffective, with resistance to herbicides pervasive and demanding a new strategy to protect crops. Rothamsted Research IMAGE: Black-grass, a pervasive weed with increasing resistance to herbicides, is a major threat to cereal crops v Credit:…

12,800 years ago the Earth was on fire

  Public Release: 1-Feb-2018 New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers University of Kansas LAWRENCE — On a ho-hum day some 12,800 years ago, the Earth had emerged from another ice age. Things were warming up, and the glaciers had retreated. Out of nowhere, the sky…

An outdoor cat can damage your sustainability cred

Public Release: 30-Jan-2018   Cornell University ITHACA, N.Y. – If you install solar panels on your roof and avoid dousing your lawn with chemicals and pesticides, your online peers may consider you to be environmentally friendly. But this street cred can all be erased if you let your cat roam around outdoors. A new study…