New tool can help estimate genetically modified pollen spread

Public Release: 10-Apr-2017   University of British Columbia Okanagan campus   Food purists may have cause to celebrate thanks to a recent international study directed by the University of British Columbia. The study, which evaluated the spread of genetically modified (GM) organisms to non-modified crops, has implications from farm to family. “Trying to figure out…

Neonicotinoids detected in drinking water in agricultural area

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017   American Chemical Society   Concern over the use of neonicotinoid pesticides is growing as studies find them in rivers and streams, and link them with declining bee populations and health effects in other animals. Now researchers report that in some areas, drinking water also contains the substances — but they also…

Bee decline threatens US crop production

Public Release: 19-Feb-2017   First US wild bee map reveals 139 ‘trouble zone’ counties University of Vermont   Caption The first national study to map US wild bees suggests they’re disappearing in many of the country’s most important farmlands. Relatively low abundances are shown here in yellow; higher abundances in blue. The first-ever study to…

Cookware made with scrap metal contaminates food

Public Release: 23-Jan-2017   Study across 10 countries warns of lead and other toxic metals OK International   IMAGE: Lead and other metals leach from cookware during cooking. SAN FRANCISCO – Aluminum cookware made from scrap metal in countries around the world poses a serious and previously unrecognized health risk to millions of people according…

Chemical mosquito controls ineffective in Zika fight

Public Release: 7-Dec-2016   University of East Anglia   Some existing methods for controlling Zika-carrying mosquitos are not effective and may even be counter-productive, according to research by scientists at the University of East Anglia (UEA). A review of previous studies into mosquito control interventions shows that there is a lack of clear evidence behind…

Worldwide, herbicide resistance has evolved in more than 200 plant species.

Public Release: 30-Nov-2016 Shifts in mating strategies help herbicide-resistant ‘superweeds’ persist University of Michigan   ANN ARBOR — Herbicide-resistant “superweeds” change their mating strategies over time, an evolutionary shift that helps them hold onto valuable genes and outcompete other plants, according to a new study from University of Michigan researchers. The study examined the relationships…

Scientists propose 10 policies to protect vital pollinators

Public Release: 24-Nov-2016   University of East Anglia   Pesticide regulation, diversified farming systems and long-term monitoring are all ways governments can help to secure the future of pollinators such as bees, flies and wasps, according to scientists. In an article published today in the journal Science, a team of researchers has suggested ten clear…

First study to link antibiotic resistance with exposure to a common disinfectant

Public Release: 31-Oct-2016 First study to link antibiotic resistance with exposure to the disinfectant chlorhexidine American Society for Microbiology Washington, DC – October 31, 2016 – Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteria exposed to chlorhexidine-containing disinfectants can become resistant to colistin, a last resort antibiotic often used against multidrug resistant pathogens. This is the first study to link…

Yearly exposure to chemicals dangerous to hormone function burdens Americans with hundreds of billions in health care costs and lost earnings

Public Release: 17-Oct-2016   NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine   Caption Annual health care costs and lost earnings in the United States from low-level but daily exposure to hazardous chemicals commonly found in plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides, exceeds $340 billion, according…

Some compounds commonly regarded as ‘bee-safe’ could be a major contributor to honey bee colony losses in North America

Public Release: 7-Oct-2016 High number of pesticides within colonies linked to honey bee deaths   University of Maryland   Honey bee colonies in the United States have been dying at high rates for over a decade, and agricultural pesticides–including fungicides, herbicides and insecticides–are often implicated as major culprits. Until now, most scientific studies have looked…