COVID19 Analytics – Mask Trash and Shoes a Major Spreader, Newsom & Fauci Being Odd, Florida Wins

Our weekly review of the current COVID data and country comparisons as well as other oddities such as Mask Litter, Trash Cans, and Shoes being unintended spreaders. All this under the guise of Amateur Python Analytics. Brief CSV File Request Code below (Pandas). That will allow you to pull Oxford University Data up to the current date. Enjoy 😉

This is a long one, next week I will make it A LOT shorter.

#covid19 #sarscov2 #data

Code Snippet:
import pandas as pd
import csv
import requests
younameit = pd.read_csv(‘https://covid.ourworldindata.org/data/owid-covid-data.csv’)

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsduetocoronaviruscovid19comparedwithdeathsfrominfluenzaandpneumoniaenglandandwales/deathsoccurringbetween1januaryand31august2020

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/26/7/20-0885_article

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2020-10/uoh-rci100120.php#.X3fUGZsAGM0.wordpress

https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2020/04/commentary-masks-all-covid-19-not-based-sound-data

Pandemic Charting – Weaponizing Uncertainty – Countries Do better with a Light touch – Python Data

COVID-19 Made worse By Social Distancing?

We are led to question whether the recommended social distancing measures to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission could increase the number of other serious instabilities. The breaking of the contagion pathways reduces the sharing of microorganisms between people, thus favoring dysbiosis, which, in turn, may increase the poor prognosis of the disease. #covid #microbiome #dysbiosis Célia P. F. Domingues, João S. Rebelo, Francisco Dionisio, Ana Botelho, Teresa Nogueira. The Social Distancing Imposed To Contain COVID-19 Can Affect Our Microbiome: a Double-Edged Sword in Human Health. mSphere, 2020; 5 (5) DOI: 10.1128/mSphere.00716-20 https://msphere.asm.org/content/5/5/e00716-20

Pandemic Over? COVID-19 World data Amateur Python Analysis

From an educational perspective, we review current COVID-19 data and arrive look at lockdowns and population density appears to have no numerical effect currently on COVID-19. In any case, this is more about exploring the code from a beginner’s standpoint with Python and DataFrames.
#covid19 #pandemicover #coviddata
CSV files found here:
https://ourworldindata.org/coronaviru…
Code: (Had to remove the angle brackets)
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
from scipy import stats
import statsmodels.api as sm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import pandas as pd
from scipy.stats import spearmanr
from scipy.stats import kendalltau
from scipy.stats import pearsonr
from scipy import stats
import seaborn as sns
import warnings
warnings.filterwarnings(“ignore”)
#Pandemic
Claim Currently Invalid —Ralph Turchiano
data = pd.read_csv(‘owid-covid-data-19SEP2020.csv’)
data.info()
pd.set_option(‘max_columns’, None)
data.tail(5)
data[‘date’] = pd.to_datetime(data[‘date’])
data.info()
data_18SEP = data[data[‘date’]==’2020-09-18′]
data_ind = data_18SEP[data_18SEP[‘human_development_index’]=.8]
data_ind.head(10)
data_ind.drop([‘iso_code’,’continent’,’handwashing_facilities’,’stringency_index’,], axis=1, inplace=True)
data_ind.columns
data_ind[‘extreme_poverty’].fillna(0, inplace=True)
data_compare = pd.DataFrame([data.loc[37991],data.loc[41736]])
data_compare
data_compare.set_index(‘location’,inplace=True)
data_compare[‘total_cases_per_million’]
data_Swe_USA=pd.DataFrame(data_compare[[‘total_cases_per_million’,’new_cases_per_million’,’new_deaths_per_million’]])
data_Swe_USApd.DataFrame(data_compare[[‘total_cases_per_million’,’new_cases_per_million’,’new_deaths_per_million’]])
data_Swe_USA
data_ind.drop([‘date’,’new_cases’,’new_deaths’,’total_tests’, ‘total_tests_per_thousand’,
‘new_tests_per_thousand’, ‘new_tests_smoothed’, ‘new_tests’,
‘new_tests_smoothed_per_thousand’, ‘tests_per_case’,’tests_units’,’new_deaths_per_million’,’positive_rate’ ], axis=1, inplace=True)
data_ind.tail()
data_ind.dropna(inplace=True)
data_ind.corr(“kendall”)
data_18SEP.tail()
data_18SEP.loc[44310]
data_18SEP.loc[44310,[‘new_cases_smoothed_per_million’,’new_deaths_smoothed_per_million’]]
New =pd.DataFrame(data[[‘new_cases_smoothed_per_million’,’new_deaths_smoothed_per_million’]])
New.corr(‘kendall’)
dataw = data.loc[data[‘iso_code’] == ‘OWID_WRL’]
dataw
dataw.datetime = pd.to_datetime(data.date)
dataw.set_index(‘date’, inplace=True)
data_cl = pd.DataFrame(dataw[[‘new_deaths_smoothed’,’new_cases_smoothed’]])
data_cl.dropna(inplace=True)
data_cl.plot(figsize=(30,12))
data_cl.tail(20)

COVID-19 Tracking Data API and Data Anomalies (No Correlations? Cases to Hospitalizations Increases)

Is there a correlation between Positive cases and Hospitalizations? Below is the API for python access, open to all who desire to filter the data. I want to just give easy access to all the beginner students data scientists out there, such as myself..Explore and Discover: **My Apologies It says High Def, but does not look High Def on video here**

Code: import matplotlib.pyplot as plt import pandas as pd from scipy import stats import statsmodels.api as sm import requests import time from IPython.display import clear_output response = requests.get(“https://covidtracking.com/api/v1/us/daily.csv”) covid = response.content ccc = open(“daily.csv”,”wb”) ccc.write(covid) ccc.close() df = pd.read_csv(“daily.csv”, index_col = ‘date’) df.head() data = df[[‘positiveIncrease’,’hospitalizedIncrease’]] dataT = df[[‘positiveIncrease’,’hospitalizedIncrease’,’hospitalizedCurrently’]] dataD = df[[‘hospitalizedIncrease’,’deathIncrease’]] dataT.head(20) plt.figure(figsize=(20,10)) Y = data[‘positiveIncrease’] X = data[‘hospitalizedIncrease’] plt.scatter(X,Y) plt.ylabel(“Tested Positive Increase”) plt.xlabel(“Hospitalization Increase”) plt.show() Y1 = sm.add_constant(Y) reg = sm.OLS(X, Y1).fit() reg.summary() data.plot(y=[‘hospitalizedIncrease’,’positiveIncrease’],xticks=data.index[0:len(data):30], rot=90, figsize=(20,10) ) for x in range(len(data)): plt.figure(figsize=(20,10)) plt.xticks( data.index.values[0:len(data):30], rotation = 90, fontsize=20 ) plt.plot(data.tail(x))

Honeysuckle Decoction Inhibits SARS-CoV-2

In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang’s group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients.

#mir2911 #sarcov2 #honeysuckle

Zhou, L., Zhou, Z., Jiang, X. et al. Absorbed plant MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication and accelerates the negative conversion of infected patients. Cell Discov 6, 54 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41421-020-00197-3

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-00197-3#ethics

An easier way to go vegan, Vitamin B12 CAN be produced during grain fermentation

The highest production was found in the rice bran (ca. 742 ng/g dw), followed by the buckwheat bran (ca. 631 ng/g dw), after fermentation. Meanwhile, the addition of L. brevis was able to dominate indigenous microbes during fermentation and thus greatly improve microbial safety during the fermentation of different grain materials. #b12 #vegan #fermentation https://helda.helsinki.fi/bitstream/handle/10138/317682/insitufo.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y In situ fortification of vitamin B12 in grain materials by fermentation withPropionibacterium freudenreichii, Chong Xie ISBN 978-951-51-6355-4 (PAPERBACK) ISBN 978-951-51-6356-1 (PDF, http://ETHESIS.HELSINKI.FI) ISSN 0355-1180 UNIGRAFIA HELSINKI 2020

More COVID Research Information Censored

More COVID Research Censored CDC and the WHO, to my dismay, are either directly or indirectly controlling the flow of information and research, possibly creating an echo chamber of bias. The level of censorship is getting so out of control; it is highly likely now it may be resulting in harm in a variety of societal dimensions. As well as the Freedom to Speech is becoming rapidly stratified among those in positions of wealth, power, or fame, It is becoming painfully apparent that self-proclaimed thought leaders may not be behooving us in times of crisis, manufactured, self-inflicted, or real. At the very least, by not reviewing and growing from our errors, we are, in all essence, committed to repeating them. Freedom of Speech, in its most basic form, is simply the freedom to speak. Take that right away from one, and you build a case to take it away from all, for, of course, your own protection. #censorship #freedomofspeech #covid

Organically and Conventionally grown Apples are very different

Organically and Conventionally grown Apples are very different

Organically and Conventionally grown Apples are very different

“Escherichia-Shigella — a group of bacteria that includes known pathogens — was found in most of the conventional apple samples, but none from organic apples. For beneficial Lactobacilli — of probiotic fame — the reverse was true.” And there may even be vindication for those who can “taste the difference” in organic produce.

#Apple #organic #conventional

Birgit Wassermann, Henry Müller, Gabriele Berg. An Apple a Day: Which Bacteria Do We Eat With Organic and Conventional Apples? Frontiers in Microbiology, 2019; 10 DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01629

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.01629/full

Lifespan and Health Extended Dramatically with Fisetin

Lifespan and Health Extended Dramatically with Fisetin

Lifespan and Health Extended Dramatically with Fisetin

University of Minnesota Medical School faculty Paul D. Robbins and Laura J. Niedernhofer and Mayo Clinic investigators James L. Kirkland and Tamara Tchkonia, showed it was possible to reduce the burden of damaged cells, termed senescent cells, and extend lifespan and improve health, even when treatment was initiated late in life. They now have shown that treatment of aged mice with the natural product Fisetin, found in many fruits and vegetables, also has significant positive effects on health and lifespan.

#healthyaging, lifespan, fisetin

Matthew J. Yousefzadeh, Yi Zhu, Sara J. McGowan, Luise Angelini, Heike Fuhrmann-Stroissnigg, Ming Xu, Yuan Yuan Ling, Kendra I. Melos, Tamar Pirtskhalava, Christina L. Inman, Collin McGuckian, Erin A. Wade, Jonathon I. Kato, Diego Grassi, Mark Wentworth, Christin E. Burd, Edgar A. Arriaga, Warren L. Ladiges, Tamara Tchkonia, James L. Kirkland, Paul D. Robbins, Laura J. Niedernhofer. Fisetin is a senotherapeutic that extends health and lifespan. EBioMedicine, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.09.015

Being Outside, The Significant Effect on a variety of Health Conditions

Being Outside, The Significant Effect on a variety of Health Conditions

Being Outside, The Significant Effect on a variety of Health Conditions

Living close to nature and spending time outside has significant and wide-ranging health benefits — according to new research. A new report reveals that exposure to greenspace reduces the risk of type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, premature death, preterm birth, stress, and high blood pressure.

Caoimhe Twohig-Bennett, Andy Jones, The health benefits of the great outdoors: A systematic review and meta-analysis of greenspace exposure and health outcomes, Environmental Research, Volume 166,2018,Pages 628-637,ISSN 0013-9351, doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2018.06.030.

Eating Eggs May Greatly reduce Stroke and CVD risks

Eating Eggs May Greatly reduce Stroke and CVD risks

Eating Eggs May Greatly reduce Stroke and CVD risks

There were significant dose-response relationships of egg consumption with morbidity of all CVD endpoints (P for linear trend <0.05). Daily consumers also had an 18% lower risk of CVD death and a 28% lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke death compared to non-consumers.

Qin C, Lv J, Guo Y, et al Associations of egg consumption with cardiovascular disease in a cohort study of 0.5 million Chinese adults Heart Published Online First: 21 May 2018. doi: 10.1136/heartjnl-2017-312651

Nicholas R Fuller, Amanda Sainsbury, Ian D Caterson, Gareth Denyer, Mackenzie Fong, James Gerofi, Chloris Leung, Namson S Lau, Kathryn H Williams, Andrzej S Januszewski, Alicia J Jenkins, Tania P Markovic; Effect of a high-egg diet on cardiometabolic risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: the Diabetes and Egg (DIABEGG) Study—randomized weight-loss and follow-up phase, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, , nqy048,

High omega-6 levels protect greatly against premature death

High omega-6 levels protect greatly against premature death

Researchers discovered that the risk of premature death was 43% lower in the group with the highest level of Omega-6, when compared to the group with the lowest level.

Serum n–6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and risk of death: the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor Study The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 107, Issue 3, 1 March 2018, Pages 427–435, DOI:10.1093/ajcn/nqx063

Testosterone levels do not naturally decline

Testosterone levels do not naturally decline

Researchers searching for reference ranges for testosterone levels among age groups discovered that there may not be a rationale for any decline in testosterone due to age alone.
Citations:
Harmonized Reference Ranges for Circulating Testosterone Levels in Men of Four Cohort Studies in the United States and Europe The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 102, Issue 4, 1 April 2017, Pages 1161–1173, DOI:10.1210/jc.2016-2935
Serum testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estradiol concentrations in older men self-reporting very good health: the healthy man study. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2012 Nov;77(5):755-63. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2012.04432.x.

Serious studies on the many risks of statins

I have decided to post a quick data rebuttal, after the publishing of a few misguided headlines (i.e ” Statins have virtually no side-effects, study finds”, and “Give statins to all over-40s, says heart surgery pioneer”, from the London Telegraph ).  This coincides with the wildly unsubstantiated recommendations being presented in prescribing statins . I felt I was left with little choice to link some of the extreme risks associated with statins, that the media somehow forgot to cover. I only had time to post these few, since I am currently working on other projects.

facepalm

It is all about Risk to Benefit Ratio – You have a right to know both. You also have the right to access non industry sponsored peer reviewed studies on the benefits of statins ( #? ), when weighing your options.

Thank you for reading,

Ralph Turchiano – clinicalnews.org

  1. Statins have unexpected effect on pool of powerful brain cells : Reduces Glial progenitor cells
  2. Statins Lower Testosterone, Libido
  3. Long-term effects of statin therapy could lead to transient or permanent cognitive impairment
  4. Most heart attack patients’ cholesterol levels did not indicate cardiac risk: half of the patients with a history of heart disease had LDL cholesterol levels lower than 100 mg/dL
  5. Cure-all? Statins have had no effect on Britain’s heart disease rate, study claims
  6. Cholesterol-drugs cause unusual swellings within neurons resulting in cognitive disturbances
  7. Cholesterol medicine affects energy production in muscles: Up to 75 per cent of patients
  8. Statins: Benefits questionable in low-risk patients
  9. Cholesterol-reducing drugs may lessen brain function, says ISU researcher
  10. New insights into link between anti-cholesterol statin drugs and depression
  11. Cholesterol Lowerings Drugs May Create Manifestations of severe irritability included homicidal impulses, threats to others, road rage, generation of fear in family members, and damage to property.
  12. Wider use of statins ‘disturbing’
  13. Statins being overprescribed for growing number of kidney disease patients / But may Kill faster
  14. Statins risk for women: Taking cholesterol-lowering drug for more than ten years ‘doubles chances of the most common breast cancer’
  15. Statins block the ability of exercise to improve fitness levels
  16. Co-Q10 deficiency may relate to statin drugs, diabetes risk
  17. New insights into link between anti-cholesterol statin drugs and depression
  18. First comprehensive paper on statins’ adverse effects released: Benefits have not been found to exceed their risks in those over 70 or 75 years old, even those with heart disease
  19. Cholesterol Drugs ( Statins ) may contribute to Atherosclerosis
  20. Statins increase risk of postoperative delirium in elderly patients: 28% Increase
  21. Statins are unlikely to prevent blood clots
  22. Relationship between statins and cognitive decline more complex than thought
  23. Statins may increase risk of interstitial lung abnormalities in smokers
  24. Statins show dramatic drug and cell dependent effects in the brain
  25. Muscle damage may be present in some patients taking statins
  26. Millions of patients may be on statins needlessly
  27. Statin warning for pregnant women
  28. Cholesterol-lowering drug linked to sleep disruptions – Possibly promoting weight gain and insulin resistance
  29. Cholesterol-lowering drugs and the effect on muscle repair and regeneration
  30. Study finds association between low cholesterol levels and cancer
  31. ‘Bad’ Cholesterol Not As Bad As People Think, Shows Texas A&M Study Texas A&M News & Information Service
  32. Low cholesterol associated with cancer in diabetics ( cancers of digestive organs and peritoneum, genital and urinary organs, lymphatic and blood tissues )
  33. Cholesterol-lowering drugs and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke

 

 

 

 

 

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Woman who drink 2 or more Diet sodas/fruit juice a day were 30 percent more likely to suffer a cardiovascular event and 50 percent more likely to die from related disease ( by association )

EEV: Reposted from our HRR site
PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
29-Mar-2014

tumblr_lhxnsqYrbh1qh4vdzo1_500

Too many diet drinks may spell heart trouble for older women

 

Largest study of its kind looks at diet drinks and cardiovascular outcomes, mortality

It appears healthy postmenopausal women who drink two or more diet drinks a day may be more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session.

In fact, compared to women who never or only rarely consume diet drinks, those who consumed two or more a day were 30 percent more likely to suffer a cardiovascular event and 50 percent more likely to die from related disease. Researchers analyzed diet drink intake and cardiovascular risk factors from 59,614 participants in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study, making this the largest study to look at the relationship between diet drink consumption, cardiac events and death. Continue reading “Woman who drink 2 or more Diet sodas/fruit juice a day were 30 percent more likely to suffer a cardiovascular event and 50 percent more likely to die from related disease ( by association )”

Vaccines cause many children to develop allergies to aluminum

Public release date: 14-Dec-2010: HRR Requested Re-Post

The following is the author's description of t...

‘Pruritic nodules’ are small lumps under the skin that cause itching and which, according to some studies, can remain for several years. A study of whooping cough vaccinations in Gothenburg a few years ago showed that almost one per cent of the children developed pruritic nodules in the area of the vaccination. Three out of four of the children who had a reaction with nodules also developed an allergy to aluminium.

“This was completely unexpected. Aluminium has been used as an adjuvant, intensifier, in vaccines for over 70 years with only a small number of reports of pruritic nodules and allergic contact dermatitis”, says Eva Netterlid. Her research has been carried out at the Occupational and Environmental Dermatology Unit in Malmö. Continue reading “Vaccines cause many children to develop allergies to aluminum”

A Cure for Sepsis ?

 

Highlights: – discovered that a single bolus of vitamin C injected early at the time of induction of sepsis, prevents capillary plugging. He has also found that a delayed bolus injection of vitamin C can  reverse plugging by restoring blood flow in previously plugged capillaries – found that early as well as delayed injections of vitamin C improves chance of survival significantly – the beneficial effect of a single bolus injection of vitamin C is long lasting and prevents capillary plugging for up to 24  hours post-injection – Previous studies have shown that it can be injected intravenously into patients with no side effects * University of Western Ontario and Lawson Health Research Institute NOV 2010 Continue reading “A Cure for Sepsis ?”

Psychological side-effects of anti-depressants worse than thought

– While the biological side-effects of antidepressants, such as weight gain and nausea, are well documented, the psychological and interpersonal effects have been largely ignored or denied. They appear to be alarmingly common.”

–  suffering from ‘sexual difficulties’ (62%) – ‘feeling emotionally numb’ (60%) – ‘feeling not like myself’ (52%) – ‘reduction in positive feelings’ (42%) – ), ‘caring less about others’ (39%)

– Over half of people aged 18 to 25 in the study reported suicidal feelings

– However, 82% reported that the drugs had helped alleviate their depression

happy pills
happy pills (Photo credit: mikdisseny)

LIVERPOOL, UK – 26 February 2014: A University of Liverpool researcher has shown that thoughts of suicide, sexual difficulties and emotional numbness as a result of anti-depressants may be more widespread than previously thought.

In a survey of 1,829 people who had been prescribed anti-depressants, the researchers found large numbers of people – over half in some cases – reporting on psychological problems due to their medication, which has led to growing concerns about the scale of the problem of over-prescription of these drugs. Continue reading “Psychological side-effects of anti-depressants worse than thought”

A cure or treatment for Cystic Fibrosis ? Delta-F508 defect is corrected with Curcumin


They found that the Delta-F508 defect is corrected in tissue culture and in mouse model systems by curcumin, the component that gives the spice turmeric its bright yellow color. In cultured cells, the CFTR protein moved to the surface of the cells, and in CFTR mice, the nasal and rectal epithtlia regained nearly normal function.

There has been no follow up research since 2006

*Science 304: 600-602 ( April 23 2004)

http://healthresearchreport.me/2012/07/24/researchers-show-cystic-fibrosis-defect-in-mice-corrected-with-turmeric-extract/

Vitamin E and Selenium raise cancer risk, Oh Really? Let us Disect the Research, and the Researchers


The SELECT trial is being utilized for sensationalist counter intuitive claims in regards to certain nutrients. The following posted below is simply a rational to why the SELECT trial being interpreted by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center is flawed. Unfortunately improper forms of the nutrients were utilized in addition to the potential corruption of Experimenter Bias from start to current. I don’t necessarily believe this is an intentional act. That however does not discount that the methodology, data interpretation, and study organization, are text book examples of how not waste tax payer dollars.

Ralph Turchiano

English: Bela Lugosi in "The Devil Bat&qu...
English: Bela Lugosi in “The Devil Bat” (1940), which is now in the public domain. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Let us Begin:

#1 Initial Trial flaw, form of vitamin E used was synthetic and the wrong isomer

ScreenHunter_151 Feb. 21 23.34

Proper form is d form (natural) not the dl (synthetic )  as pointed out in excerpts

ScreenHunter_151 Feb. 21 23.42

ScreenHunter_151 Feb. 22 00.17

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-04/ru-vei042312.php

#2 The select study which ended in 2008 all supplement usage was halted. In addition at that time there was no statistical difference

ScreenHunter_151 Feb. 21 23.46 Continue reading “Vitamin E and Selenium raise cancer risk, Oh Really? Let us Disect the Research, and the Researchers”

CBS This Morning – “Says Supplements no good for the Heart” Silly Silly CBS

Quick rebuttal to the inaccurate statement that nutritional supplements are an ineffective tool against heart disease.

The CBS Doctor Tara Narula reading from a scripted source … Made the inaccurate statement that nutritional supplements have no positive impact on heart health. She made that statement with what appears to be 100% certainty. Which is cool, because it makes it so much easier to discredit… While my objective is not to prove to you that nutritional supplements are the way to go for heart health. My objective is simply to prove beyond 100% certainty that their statements are highly inaccurate as well as misleading. Thank You CBS for making this so easy… 😉

ScreenHunter_220 Feb. 19 10.22

 

A few Links to Confirming Research:

Mayo Clinic proceedings highlights research about cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 fatty acids Continue reading “CBS This Morning – “Says Supplements no good for the Heart” Silly Silly CBS”

Dosing schedule of pneumococcal vaccine linked with increased risk of getting multiresistant strain

Public release date: 7-Sep-2010 – EEV: Requested Re-Post from the HRR site.

Infants who received heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV-7) at 2, 4, and 11 months were more likely than unvaccinated controls to have nasopharyngeal acquisition of pneumococcal serotype 19A

– the increase in serotype 19A disease was associated in time with the widespread implementation of PCV-7 in routine infant immunization programs

– A rapid increase in the presence of pneumococcal serotype 19A strains that are often multiresistant to antibiotics has been observed over the last decade

– serotype 19A is now the leading causative pneumococcal serotype of invasive and respiratory pneumococcal disease

Question mark in Esbjerg
Question mark in Esbjerg (Photo credit: alexanderdrachmann)

Infants who received heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV-7) at 2, 4, and 11 months were more likely than unvaccinated controls to have nasopharyngeal (in the nasal passages and upper part of the throat behind the nose) acquisition of pneumococcal serotype 19A, a leading cause of respiratory pneumococcal disease, according to a study in the September 8 issue of JAMA. Continue reading “Dosing schedule of pneumococcal vaccine linked with increased risk of getting multiresistant strain”

Free statins with fast food could neutralize heart risk, scientists say

Public release date: 12-Aug-2010

HRR: This is not humor, this is a real article.

– published in the Sunday 15 August issue of the American Journal of Cardiology 2010

– One statin, simvastatin would cost less than 5p per customer – not much different to a sachet of ketchup.

Confusion Corner
Confusion Corner (Photo credit: Brian Metcalfe)

Fast food outlets could provide statin drugs free of charge so that customers can neutralize the heart disease dangers of fatty food, researchers at Imperial College London suggest in a new study published this week. Continue reading “Free statins with fast food could neutralize heart risk, scientists say”

174 Health Research Report 07 FEB 2014

HRR

                     

174

07 FEB 2014 /  White paper draft

Compiled by Ralph Turchiano

 

•        Detailed research references and further affiliations on each article are posted at http://www.healthreserachreport.me .

In this issue:

  1. Low Vitamin D Levels During Pregnancy May Increase Risk of Severe Preeclampsia
  2. Certain probiotics could help women lose weight
  3. Melatonin shows potential to slow tumor growth in certain breast cancers
  4. Aspirin still overprescribed for stroke prevention in AF
  5. New study suggests choline recommendations during pregnancy may be too low
  6. Geranium extracts inhibit HIV-1
  7. Blue light may fight fatigue around the clock
  8. Are you Big Pharma’s new target market?
  9. Simulated blindness can help revive hearing, researchers find
  10. Toxin in seafood causes kidney damage in mice at levels considered safe for consumption
  11. Huntington disease prevention trial shows creatine safe, suggests slowing of progression

Continue reading “174 Health Research Report 07 FEB 2014”

Video Health Research Report 27 JAN 2014

Topics:
Mouthwash is a Disaster for health Raises Blood Pressure and Stroke Risk
* Journal of Free Radical Biology and Medicine JAN 2014
Fever Reducing Medications increase virus activity/load and transmission
* Proceedings of Royal Society B Today JAN 2014
Medical Treatments now 3rd leading cause of death in developed nations
* New Scientist Jan 2014

173 Health Research Report 25 JAN 2010

 HRR

173

25 JAN 2014 /  White paper draft

Compiled by Ralph Turchiano

 

•        Detailed research references and further affiliations on each article are posted at http://www.healthreserachreport.me .

In this Issue:

  1. Study examines probiotic use in preventing gastrointestinal disorders in infants
  2. Altering the community of gut bacteria promotes health and increases lifespan
  3. Warning! Warning Labels Can Be Dangerous to Your Health
  4. Vitamin D supplements reduce pain in fibromyalgia sufferers
  5. Higher vitamin D levels associated with better cognition and mood in PD patients
  6. Melatonin may lower prostate cancer risk
  7. Ingredients in chocolate, tea and berries could guard against diabetes
  8. McMaster University researchers find fever-reducing medications may aid spread of influenza
  9. Can fish oil help preserve brain cells?
  10. Detecting Sickness By Smell
  11. More benefits emerging for one type of omega-3 fatty acid: DHA

Continue reading “173 Health Research Report 25 JAN 2010”

Brief fever common in kids given influenza, pneumococcal vaccines together

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:
6-Jan-2014

– Parents should be made aware that their child might develop a fever following simultaneous influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations

– children who received simultaneous influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, about a third (37.6 percent) had a fever of 100.4 F (38 C) or higher on the day of or day after vaccination, compared with children who received only the pneumococcal (9.5 percent) or only the influenza (7.5 percent) vaccine.

Findings suggest utility of text messaging to monitor safety

NEW YORK, NY (Jan. 6, 2014) – Giving young children the influenza and pneumococcal vaccines together appears to increase their risk of fever, according to a study led by researchers from Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, the fever was brief, and medical care was sought for few children, supporting the routine immunization schedule for these vaccines, including the recommendation to administer them simultaneously. The study, which looked at children 6-23 months old, was published online on Jan. 6, 2014, in JAMA Pediatrics. Continue reading “Brief fever common in kids given influenza, pneumococcal vaccines together”

Vaccine’s, the Lucky Rabbits Foot, and Shhh No questions allowed ( Part 1 )

Vaccines are just a form of medicine like everything else. Some of them good, and some of them not so good. In any case you have a right to know.

Just remember Scientific Method – Observation, Hypothesis, and Theory as well as Risk to Benefit Ratio ..> But don’t get me started on Epigenetics

We should all have the freedom to inoculate ourselves based upon fact… The first one However, I threw in for fun ; )

There are many more as this is just part 1 …. Just sticking with RECENT Peer Review. But let the first Salvo fly

Change in human social behavior in response to a common vaccine and Funvax Using Vaccines to Alter Human Behavior VMAT2 Gene 

Pneumococcal vaccination in adults does not appear to work

Live Vaccination against ( German Measles ) Rubella caused Signifigant Depression up to 10 weeks – Vaccines/ Bacteria Can Alter Mood and Behavior

No significant influenza (FLU) vaccine effectiveness could  be demonstrated for any season, age or setting after adjusting for county, sex, insurance, chronic conditions recommended for influenza vaccination and timing of influenza vaccination

The Hidden Threat That Could Prevent Polio’s Global Eradication – Vaccinated Children that Become  “chronic excreters”

U.S. Court Confrims M.M.R. Vaccine Caused Autism or Cumulative  (Verified through Multiple Sources) From DEC 2012 Judgment

Pig Virus DNA Found in Rotavirus Vaccine : Millions of children worldwide, including 1 million in the U.S. exposed

Seasonal flu vaccination increase the risk of infection with pandemic H1N1 flu by 68%

Flu vaccine may not protect seniors well / Vaccine was totally ineffective

OHSU research suggests America may over-vaccinate

Some children vaccinated against hepatitis B may have an increased risk of MS

Flu shot does not cut risk of death in elderly / no decrease in hospital admissions or all-cause mortality

Measles, Mumps, Rubella vaccine linked with 2-fold risk of seizures

‘MMR vaccine causes autism’ claim banned – Followed by 15 studies that link Strong Correlation, it May

Influenza Vaccine Failure among Highly Vaccinated Military Personal, No protection against Pandemic Strains.

Live virus used in polio vaccine can evolve and infect, warns TAU researcher

India: Paralysis cases soar after oral polio vaccine introduced

Flu Vaccine offers no Protection in seniors

Common cold virus can cause polio in mice when injected into muscles

Flu shot does not reduce risk of death

Swine flu vaccine linked to child narcolepsy: EU Confirmation

WHO and the pandemic flu “conspiracies” – FULL report from the BMJ and The Bureau of Investigative Journalism  2010

A vaccine-derived strain of poliovirus that has spread in recent years is serious but it can be tackled with an existing vaccine

Dosing schedule of pneumococcal vaccine linked with increased risk of getting multiresistant strain

Expert questions US public health agency advice on influenza vaccines

Whooping Cough Vaccine is obsolete ” Bulk of the cases were in fully vaccinated children ” few cases among unvaccinated children

Flu vaccine backfires in pigs / vaccinated against H1N2 influenza were more vulnerable to the rarer H1N1 strain

Higher anaphylaxis rates after HPV vaccination: CMAJ study / significantly higher – 5 to 20 fold – than that identified in comparable school-based vaccination programs

Allergic to Gummy Bears? Be Cautious Getting the Flu Shot

Vaccination campaign doubles HBV mutations

Video Health Research Report 17 Dec 2013

Topics:

Rebuttal to ” The Times” “Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine” and the” University of Warwick”  that “Vitamins are a Waste” metastudy

* www.healthrseearchreport.me

Vitamin D Decreases Pain in Women with Type 2 Diabetes and Depression

* Presented at an Oct. 2013 research conference at Loyola’s Health Sciences Campus Natural Compound Mitigates Effects of Methamphetamine Abuse

* Nov 2013 – Neuroscience Letters LSUHSC research finds combo of plant nutrients kills breast cancer cells

* November 2013 issue of The Journal of Cancer

Researchers see added nutritional benefits in organic milk

* Nov 2013 Washington State University research

Rebuttal to CNN and The Times Claim ” Vitamin pills are a waste of money, experts warn “

Article Title : Vitamin pills are a waste of money, experts warn

I have to admit, they are pretty stupid…. This is the old Meta-Analysis game unfortunately without a peer review prior to a press release, there really is not much to go on. They don’t even have friggin footnotes posted.

The Articles offered no concrete data, nor science to rebuke. Nor was there any peer reviewed documentation ( i.e. per http://www.plosone.org/) (. As with most absolute statements claiming 100% certainty, they are pretty easy to destroy…

To quote them ” One of the research papers involved the retrospective study of 24 previous trials. In total 450,000 people were involved in the trials and the paper concluded that there was no beneficial effect on mortality from taking vitamins.” ” Declaring “case closed”  Wow?

I am sure more info will arise as time unravels the truth… In the meantime here is enough of a salvo to fire across their broadside, and sink the ship of “SS Case Closed”.

Just a quick 10 peer reviewed articles…I would no advise, not relying on any news source that did not attempt to validate it sources such as “The Times” nor “CNN”. Continue reading “Rebuttal to CNN and The Times Claim ” Vitamin pills are a waste of money, experts warn “”

Long-term use of common heartburn and ulcer medications linked to vitamin B12 deficiency

Contact: Cyrus Hedayati chedayati@golinharris.com 415-318-4377 Kaiser Permanente

OAKLAND, Calif. — Long-term use of commonly prescribed heartburn and ulcer medications is linked to a higher risk of vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Continue reading “Long-term use of common heartburn and ulcer medications linked to vitamin B12 deficiency”

Britain’s poor ‘will die before they retire’ if pension reforms aren’t matched by health improvements

Stark disparity in healthy life expectancy ‘must be tackled’ for pension age  to be raised fairly

Charlie Cooper

Friday, 6 December 2013

Thousands of Britain’s poorest people “will be dead before they can retire” if sweeping pension reforms are not matched by urgent action on health inequalities between rich and poor, experts have said.

Plans to raise the basic state pension age to 70 for people currently in their twenties were laid out in the George Osborne’s Autumn Statement this week. But with male life expectancy at birth as low as 66 in some of the most deprived parts of the country, public health experts have warned that a “one size fits all” pension age risks condemning many to a life without retirement.

Average UK life expectancy at birth was 78.2 in 2010. Nationally, the figure is increasing, but huge variations exist and progress has been slower in deprived communities where poverty leads to poor diets, smoking rates are higher and alcohol abuse more common.

Continue reading “Britain’s poor ‘will die before they retire’ if pension reforms aren’t matched by health improvements”

The Counter to the Lancet Claims Vitamin D has little Efficay – Well the Lancet is mistaken ( Here, try some Science )

For the very non scientific claims of Vitamin D lacking evidence, as posted in other publications like the Mail onlie:

Vitamin D supplements ‘don’t ward off ill health’: Little evidence pills lower risk of cancer, strokes or other conditions

Here are small snipets of data to unhinge experimenter bias and media misconceptions:

MS reversed in mice / Single dose  ( Calcitriol ) Vitamin D followed by Vitamin D supplements

Vitamin D reduces blood pressure and relieves depression in women with diabetes

Vitamin D supplementation may delay precocious puberty in girls

Vitamin D deficiency may help spread of hepatitis B throughout liver

Preterm infants may need 800 IU of vitamin D3 per day

Sunshine hormone, vitamin D, may offer hope for treating liver fibrosis

Vitamin D may reduce risk of uterine fibroids, according to NIH study

Vitamin D proven to boost energy — from within the cells

Experts find link between low doses of vitamin D and adverse pregnancy outcomes

Vitamin D benefits breathing in tuberculosis patients

Study reveals potential immune benefits of vitamin D supplements in healthy individuals

Vitamin D, omega-3 may help clear amyloid plaques found in Alzheimer’s

Low vitamin D levels may increase risk of Type 1 diabetes: Up to 50%

Vitamin D Holds Promise in Battling a Deadly Breast Cancer, SLU Researchers Say

New review associates vitamin D with lower rates of tooth decay

Researchers recommend pregnant women take 4,000 IU vitamin D a day

Vitamin D, may protect us from background radiation and could be used as a safe protective agent before or after a low-level nuclear incident

Gestational exposure to urban air pollution linked to vitamin D deficiency in newborns

Could vitamin D, a key milk nutrient, affect how you age?

Vitamin D deficiency: Common and problematic yet preventable

* Alright I can’t post all the research titles over the past 7  years, since just the titles alone are over 35 pages…. You are welcome to search for far more 😉

Sincerely,

Ralph Tutchiano

Children’s cardiovascular fitness declining worldwide

Contact: Carrie Thacker carrie.thacker@heart.org 214-706-1665 American Heart Association

The study is the first to show that kids’ cardiovascular fitness has declined around the globe since about 1975:

  • In the United States, kids’ cardiovascular endurance fell an average 6 percent per decade between 1970 and 2000.
  • Across nations, endurance has declined consistently by about 5 percent every decade.
  • Kids today are roughly 15 percent less fit from a cardiovascular standpoint than their parents were as youngsters.
  • In a mile run, kids today are about a minute and a half slower than their peers 30 years ago.

Continue reading “Children’s cardiovascular fitness declining worldwide”

Health Research Report -Video- 18 NOV 2013

Topics:
Ibuprofen and paracetamol Useless as well as make Colds and sore throats worse
* BMJ NOV 2013
Flu Shots may kill you if you have Gelatin Allergies
*ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting notes NOV 2013
Hay Fever (Oral Allergy Syndrome) at risk of life threatening reactions to certain High Blood Pressure Medications (ACE)
*ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting notes NOV 2013
New US erroneous Guidelines on statins extremely dangerous, and un-researched
*Croydon University Hospital Commentary NOV 2013

Vitamin C could ease muscle fatigue in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

Contact: Donna Krupa dkrupa@the-aps.org American Physiological Society

Bethesda, Md. (Nov. 7, 2013)—Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease—a health problem in which the lungs lose their inherent springiness, making it progressively harder to breathe—can have a dramatic effect on the ability to exercise and even perform simple activities of daily life because of the disease’s fallout effects on skeletal muscles. Several factors have been implicated in these muscle problems. These include loss of fitness from inactivity, problems with the part of cells that convert fuel to energy caused by the COPD itself, and oxidative stress, a phenomenon in which cells and tissues become damaged by unstable molecules called free radicals that harm other molecules in domino-like chain reactions. Some research suggests that easing oxidative stress could improve skeletal muscle function.

To test this idea, researchers led by Matthew J. Rossman of the George E. Whalen VA Medical Center and the University of Utah gave COPD patients intravenous (IV) infusions of vitamin C, a powerful antioxidant that can combat oxidative stress, or saline as a placebo before the patients performed knee extension exercises and underwent neuromuscular function tests. Their findings show that IV infusions of vitamin C can improve skeletal muscle fatigue in COPD patients, further implicating the role of oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle problems that accompany this disease.

The article is entitled “Ascorbate Infusion Increases Skeletal Muscle Fatigue Resistance in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease“. It appears in the online edition of the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, published by the American Physiological Society.

Methodology

The researchers worked with 10 COPD patients. Each patient performed a set of knee extension exercises, receiving either an IV infusion of saline or an IV infusion of vitamin C before the set, but both the study volunteers and the researchers monitoring the exercises didn’t know which infusion the volunteers received. Two to three days later, the volunteers performed a second set of knee exercises after receiving the other type of infusion. Before and after they performed these exercises, the study subjects had blood drawn to test for antioxidant levels. Immediately after the exercises, the researchers measured a variety of other factors, including the volunteers’ breathing and heart rate, blood pressure, feelings of exertion of breathlessness, and blood flow.

Results

The researchers found that during exercises, patients had significantly less muscle fatigue after receiving vitamin C and breathed better and slower. After vitamin C infusions, the volunteers also had significantly higher blood antioxidant activity than when they received only saline. Additionally, vitamin C infusions lowered their resting blood pressure and blood flow.

Importance of the Findings

These findings suggest that IV infusions of antioxidants, such as vitamin C, can curb the skeletal muscle fatigue that plagues COPD patients. They also provide further evidence that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the skeletal muscle dysfunction that many COPD patients experience. They suggest that antioxidants could eventually be used as a treatment for these problems.

“Targeting oxidative stress with some form of antioxidant therapy in a clinical setting may represent an important therapeutic avenue for patients with COPD,” they write.

###

Study Team

In addition to Matthew J. Rossman, the study team also includes Ryan S. Garten, J. Jonathan Groot, Van Reese, Jia Zhao, Markus Amann, and Russell S. Richardson, all of the George E. Whalen VA Medical Center and the University of Utah.

Physiology is the study of how molecules, cells, tissues, and organs function in health and disease. Established in 1887, the American Physiological Society (APS) was the first US society in the biomedical sciences field. The Society represents more than 11,000 members and publishes 14 peer-reviewed journals with a worldwide readership.

NOTE TO EDITORS: To schedule an interview with a member of the research team, please contact Donna Krupa at dkrupa@the-aps.org, @Phyziochick, or 301.634.7209. The article is available online at http://bit.ly/1bZiW5W.

Higher chocolate consumption associated with lower levels of total fat—fat deposits all over the body—and central—abdominal—fat, independently of whether or not subjects are physically active, and of their diet

Scientists at the University of Granada have disproved the old idea that chocolate is fattening, in a study reported this week in Nutrition

 

The study—possibly the most comprehensive to date—included 1458 European adolescents aged between 12 and 17 years

University of Granada researchers from the Faculty of Medicine and the Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences have scientifically disproven the old belief that eating chocolate is fattening. In an article published this week in the journal Nutrition, the authors have shown that higher consumption of chocolate is associated with lower levels of total fat (fat deposited all over the body) and central fat (abdominal), independently of whether or not the individual participates in regular physical activity and of diet, among other factors.

The researchers determined whether greater chocolate consumption associated with higher body mass index and other indicators of total and central body fat in adolescents participating in the HELENA (Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence) study. This project, financed by the European Union, studies eating habits and lifestyle in young people in 9 European countries, including Spain.

 

Independent of diet and physical activity

The study involved 1458 adolescents aged between 12 and 17 years and results showed that a higher level of chocolate consumption associated with lower levels of total and central fat when these were estimated through body mass index, body fat percentage—measured by both skinfolds and bioelectrical impedance analysis—and waist circumference. These results were independent of the participant’s sex, age, sexual maturation, total energy intake, intake of saturated fats, fruit and vegetables, consumption of tea and coffee, and physical activity.

As the principle author Magdalena Cuenca-García explains, although chocolate is considered a high energy content food—it is rich in sugars and saturated fats—“recent studies in adults suggest chocolate consumption is associated with a lower risk of cardiometabolic disorders”.

In fact, chocolate is rich in flavonoids—especially catechins—which have many healthy properties: “they have important antioxidant, antithrombotic, anti-inflammatory and antihypertensive effects and can help prevent ischemic heart disease”.

Recently, another cross-sectional study in adults conducted by University of California researchers found that more frequent chocolate consumption also associated with a lower body mass index. What’s more, these results were confirmed in a longitudinal study in women who followed a catechin-rich diet.

The effect could be partly due to the influence of catechins on cortisol production and on insulin sensitivity, both of which are related with overweight and obesity.

 

Calorie impact is not the only thing that matters

The University of Granada researchers have sought to go further and analyse the effect of chocolate consumption at a critical age like adolescence by also controlling other factors that could influence the accumulation of fat. The research, which is both novel and, perhaps, the largest and best-controlled study to date, is the first to focus on the adolescent population. It includes a large number of body measures, objective measurement of physical activity, detailed dietary recall with 2 non-consecutive 24-hour registers using image-based software, and controls for the possible effect of a group of key variables.

In Nutrition, the authors stress that the biological impact of foods should not be evaluated solely in terms of calories. “The most recent epidemiologic research focuses on studying the relation between specific foods—both for their calorie content and for their components—and the risk factors for developing chronic illnesses, including overweight and obesity”.

Despite their results, the authors insist that chocolate consumption should always be moderate. “In moderate quantities, chocolate can be good for you, as our study has shown. But, undoubtedly, excessive consumption is prejudicial. As they say: you can have too much of a good thing”.

The University of Granada researchers stress that their findings “are also important from a clinical perspective since they contribute to our understanding of the factors underlying the control and maintenance of optimal weight”.

 

 

Reference: Association between chocolate consumption and fatness in European adolescents Magdalena Cuenca-García, Jonatan R. Ruiz, Francisco B. Ortega, Manuel J. Castillo Nutrition (2013). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2013.07.011

chocolate

 

In the photo, the University of Granada researchers who have published this article. From left to right, Jonatan R. Ruiz, Magdalena Cuenca-García, Manuel J. Castillo and Francisco B. Ortega. Dr Ruiz and Dr Ortega currently work in the Department of Physical and Sports Education (Faculty of Physical Activity and Sports Sciences), and Dr Cuenca-García and Dr Castillo work in the Department of Physiology (Faculty of Medicine).

Corresponding author: Magdalena Cuenca-García Department of Physiology Faculty of Medicine University of Granada Telephone: +34 958 24 3540 E-mail address: mmcuenca@ugr.es

Obesity expands amid federal anti-obesity campaign

 

Posted By Neil Munro On 4:40 PM 11/01/2013

The national obesity rate has expanded since 2012, even as federal regulators and first lady Michelle Obama exhort the nation to slim down, eat less and exercise.

The adult obesity rate climbed from 26.1 percent in January 2011, up to 27.2 percent in late 2012, according to Gallup’s survey, released on Friday – a 4.2 percent rise in 24 months.

The jump is a surprise, partly because the obesity rate had drifted down from 26.5 percent in January 2009, to 26.1 percent in January 2011, during the recession.

For more than a decade, federal health agencies have tried to reverse the growing obesity rate. In 2000, for example, the agencies announced their goal of reducing obesity to 15 percent by 2010.

The federal takeover of the nation’s health sector via the Obamacare law is also being used by experts to tighten the nation’s girth. Health companies must include anti-fatness measures in the benefit plans they offer to the nation. The value of the mandates is unclear, but they will likely fatten revenues of professionals in the anti-fat business.

Gallup’s survey showed that the obesity rate is lower among populations that are wealthy, white, older and live on the West coast. Rates are higher among populations that are middle-aged, black, latino, poorer and who live in the south.

“The U.S. obesity rate thus far in 2013 is trending upward and will likely surpass all annual obesity levels since 2008,” the Gallup report said.

Gallup also suggested that employers regulate their employees’ weight.

“Employers can also take an active role to help lower obesity rates… The annual cost for lost productivity due to workers being above normal weight or having a history of chronic conditions ranges from $160 million among agricultural workers to $24.2 billion among professionals,” Gallup claimed.

MIchelle Obama has also tried to draft companies in her waistline-reducing agenda.

Kids’ waistlines matter because the costs of treating adults’ obesity “matter for every business in America,” she wrote in February 2013.

“We spend $190 billion a year treating obesity-related health conditions like diabetes and heart disease, and a significant portion of those costs are borne by America’s businesses,” she wrote.

“We need every business in America to dig deeper, get more creative, and find new ways to generate revenue by giving American families better information and healthier choices. We know this can be done in a way that’s good for our kids and good for businesses,” she wrote.

In August, the first lady tried to claim that her “Let’s Move” campaign deserved credit for a drop in the number of obese children.

“Obesity among low-income preschoolers declined, from 2008 through 2011, in 19 of 43 states and territories studied, said a study released in August by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Today’s announcement reaffirms my belief that together, we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life,” said an August statement from the first lady.

The results were “evidence of progress,” according to her website, LetsMove.gov.

“Let’s Move! is a comprehensive initiative, launched by the First Lady, dedicated to solving the challenge of childhood obesity within a generation, so that children born today will grow up healthier and able to pursue their dreams,” according to the site.

The government-centered program does allow a role for parents.

“Everyone has a role to play in reducing childhood obesity, including parents, elected officials from all levels of government, schools, health care professionals, faith-based and community-based organizations, and private sector companies,” the site declares.

Follow Neil on Twitter

——————————————————————————–

Article printed from The Daily Caller: http://dailycaller.com

URL to article: http://dailycaller.com/2013/11/01/obesity-expands-amid-federal-anti-obesity-campaign/

Health Research Report 28 OCT 2013 ( Video )

 

Topics:

Walking Corpse trigger found ( Cotard’s Syndrome ) It’s a Cold Sore Cream * Journal of the Neurological Sciences Oct 2013

Compound derived from vegetables shields from lethal radiation doses * Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences Oct 2013

Virtually numbed: Immersive video gaming alters real-life experience * Journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review Oct 2013

Moderate Exercise not only treats, but prevents depression * American Journal of Preventive Medicine Oct 2013

40 years of CDC nutrition research fatally flawed

Contact: Jeff Stensland stenslan@mailbox.sc.edu 803-777-3686 University of South Carolina

40 years of federal nutrition research fatally flawed

University of South Carolina study shows flaws in NHANES data

Four decades of nutrition research funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) may be invalid because the method used to collect the data was seriously flawed, according to a new study by the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina.

The study, led by Arnold School exercise scientist and epidemiologist Edward Archer, has demonstrated significant limitations in the measurement protocols used in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The findings, published in PLOS ONE (The Public Library of Science), reveal that a majority of the nutrition data collected by the NHANES are not “physiologically credible,” Archer said.

These results suggest that without valid population-level data, speculations regarding the role of energy intake in the rise in the prevalence of obesity are without empirical support, he said.

The NHANES is the most comprehensive compilation of data on the health of children and adults in the United States. The survey combines interviews of self-reported food and beverage consumption over 24 hours and physical examinations to assess the health and nutritional status of the US population. Conducted by the CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the NHANES is the primary source of data used by researchers studying the impact of nutrition and diet on health.

The study examined data from 28,993 men and 34,369 women, 20 to 74 years old, from NHANES I (1971 – 1974) through NHANES (2009 – 2010), and looked at the caloric intake of the participants and their energy expenditure, predicted by height, weight, age and sex. The results show that — based on the self-reported recall of food and beverages — the vast majority of the NHANES data “are physiologically implausible, and therefore invalid,” Archer said.

In other words, the “calories in” reported by participants and the “calories out,” don’t add up and it would be impossible to survive on most of the reported energy intakes. This misreporting of energy intake varied among participants, and was greatest in obese men and women who underreported their intake by an average 25 percent and 41 percent (i.e., 716 and 856 Calories per-day respectively).

“Throughout its history, the NHANES survey has failed to provide accurate estimates of the habitual caloric consumption of the U.S. population,” Archer said. “Although improvements were made to the NHANES measurement protocol after 1980, there was little improvement to the validity of U.S. nutritional surveillance.”

These limitations “suggest that the ability to estimate population trends in caloric intake and generate public policy relevant to diet-health relationships is extremely limited,” said Archer, who conducted the study with colleagues at the Arnold School.

“The nation’s major surveillance tool for studying the relationships between nutrition and health is not valid. It is time to stop spending tens of millions of health research dollars collecting invalid data and find more accurate measures,” he said.

###

 

To access the current study, please visit: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0076632.

165th Health Research Report 5 OCT 2015 ( Synopsis)

ScreenHunter_42 Dec. 31 12.07           

Health Research Report

165th Issue Date 5 OCT 2013

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

FOUND AT :

 

www.healthresearchreport.me 

In This Issue:

1.    Melatonin helps control weight gain as it stimulates the appearance of ‘beige fat’

2.    Folic acid deficiency can affect the health of great, great grandchildren

3.    Mouse studies reveal promising vitamin D-based treatment for MS

4.    Organized screening for prostate cancer does more harm than good

5.    Niacin, the fountain of youth

6.    Red wine chemical remains effective against cancer after the body converts it

7.    Component of citrus fruits found to block the formation of kidney cysts

Niacin, the fountain of youth

The vitamin niacin has a life-prolonging effect, as Michael Ristow has demonstrated in roundworms. From his study, the ETH-Zurich professor also concludes that so-called reactive oxygen species are healthy, not only disagreeing with the general consensus, but also many of his peers.

             Fabio Bergamin
Roundworms live longer when fed the food supplement niacin (inverted microscopic photo). (Photo: Michael Ristow / ETH Zurich)

       Roundworms live longer when fed the food supplement niacin (inverted microscopic photo). (Photo: Michael Ristow / ETH Zurich)       <!– (mehr Bilder) –>

Who would not want to live a long and healthy life? A freely available food supplement could help in this respect, scientists from ETH Zurich have demonstrated in roundworms. Vitamin B3 – also known as niacin – and its metabolite nicotinamide in the worms’ diet caused them to live for about one tenth longer than usual.

As an international team of researchers headed by Michael Ristow, a professor of energy metabolism, has now experimentally demonstrated, niacin and nicotinamide take effect by promoting formation of so-called free radicals. “In roundworms, these reactive oxygen species prolong life,” says Ristow.

“No scientific evidence for usefulness of antioxidants”

This might seem surprising as reactive oxygen species are generally considered to be unhealthy. Ristow’s view also contradicts the textbook opinion championed by many other scientists. Reactive oxygen species are known to damage somatic cells, a condition referred to as oxidative stress. Particular substances, so-called antioxidants, which are also found in fruit, vegetables and certain vegetable oils, are capable of neutralising these free radicals. Many scientists believe that antioxidants are beneficial to health.

“The claim that intake of antioxidants, especially in tablet form, promotes any aspect of human health lacks scientific support,” says Ristow. He does not dispute that fruit and vegetables are healthy. However, this may rather be caused by other compounds contained therein, such as so-called polyphenols. “Fruit and vegetables are healthy, despite the fact that they contain antioxidants,” says the ETH-Zurich professor. Based on the current and many previous findings he is convinced that small amounts of reactive oxygen species and the oxidative stress they trigger have a health-promoting impact. “Cells can cope well with oxidative stress and neutralise it,” says Ristow.

Substance mimics endurance sport

In earlier studies on humans, Ristow demonstrated that the health-enhancing effect of endurance sports is mediated via an increased formation of reactive oxygen species – and that antioxidants abolish this effect. Based on the present study, he concludes that niacin brings about a similar metabolic condition to exercise. “Niacin tricks the body into believing that it is exercising – even when this is not the case,” says Ristow. Such compounds are known as “exercise mimetics”.

The researchers conducted their experiments on the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. This worm, which is merely one millimetre in length, can be easily maintained and has a lifespan of only a month, making it the ideal model organism for ageing research.

Also relevant for humans

The results of the study may also be of relevance for humans, says Ristow. After all, the metabolic pathway initiated by niacin is very similar in roundworms and higher organisms. Whether niacin has similar effects on the life expectancy of mice is the subject of Ristow’s current research. Previous studies also suggest a health-enhancing effect of niacin in humans with elevated blood cholesterol levels.

Niacin and nicotinamide have been approved as dietary supplements for decades. Ristow could easily envisage the substances being used broadly for therapeutic purposes in the future. A whole series of foods naturally contain niacin, including meat, liver, fish, peanuts, mushrooms, rice and wheat bran. Whether nutritional uptake is sufficient for a health-enhancing or lifespan-extending effect, however, remains to be demonstrated, says Ristow.

Disputed impact of enzymes

The latest study on the effects of niacin and nicotinamide is based on a particular class of enzymes, the sirtuins, which convert niacin into nicotinamide. Moreover, they are also involved in gene regulation, helping to down regulate the activity of certain genes. Until today, scientists have been disputing whether sirtuins have a life-prolonging impact.

Ristow and his team’s work now suggests that the activity of sirtuins actually prolongs life in roundworms. According to the study, however, the life-prolonging effect is not down to gene regulation, as has often been supposed in the past. Instead, the effect is due to the conversion of niacin into nicotinamide. Studying genetically modified roundworms that were unable to convert nicotinamide into certain other metabolic products, the scientists did not observe any lifespan extension, even after overexpression of sirtuins, which otherwise lead to an increased life expectancy.

Literature reference

Schmeisser K et al.: Role of Sirtuins in Lifespan Regulation is Linked to Methylation of Nicotinamide. Nature Chemical Biology, 2013, Advance Online Publication, doi: 10.1038/nchembio.1352

Health Research Report 30 SEP 2013

Topics:

Melatonin consumption shown to help increase metabolism /Burn fat
* Journal of Pineal Research : 26 SEP 2013
Multiple Sclerosis reversed in 100% of animals using Calcitriol & ongoing Vitamin D Sup
* Journal of Neuroimmunology : Online August addition

Folic acid deficiency can affect the health of great, great grandchildren

Contact: Genevieve Maul gm349@admin.cam.ac.uk 44-012-237-65542 University of Cambridge

Deficiencies associated with spina bifida, heart defects and placental abnormalities

Folic acid deficiency can cause severe health problems in offspring, including spina bifida, heart defects and placental abnormalities. A study out today reveals that a mutation in a gene necessary for the metabolism of folic acid not only impacts the immediate offspring but can also have detrimental health effects on the next several generations. The new research, which also sheds light on the molecular mechanism of folic acid (also known as folate) during development, was published today in the journal Cell.

“Although our research focused on genetic mutations which disrupts the break down and metabolism of folic acid, we believe that folic acid deficiency in the diet would have a similar multi-generational impact on health,” said Dr Erica Watson from the Centre for Trophoblast Research at the University of Cambridge, who led the study.

The detrimental effects of folic acid deficiency on development are quite well known. As a result, many countries, to include Canada and the US, have implemented folate fortification programmes which require folic acid to be added to cereal products. However, until now, very little was known about how folic acid deficiency caused the diverse range of health problems in offspring.

“Fortification programmes have reduced the risk of health effects but not eliminated them completely,” said Dr Watson. “Based on our research, we now believe that it may take more than one generation to eliminate the health problems caused by folate deficiency.”

The researchers, from the Universities of Cambridge and Calgary, used mice for the study as they metabolize folic acid very similarly to humans and because folic acid deficiency or mutations in the same genes required to break down folic acid in humans result in similar developmental abnormalities and diseases in mice. This enabled the researchers to explore how the molecular mechanism of folic acid deficiency impacted development, thereby causing health problems.

For the study, the scientists used mice in which a gene called Mtrr was specifically mutated. The gene is key to the normal progression of the folic acid cycle and, when mutated, it results in abnormal folic acid metabolism causing similar effects to dietary folic acid deficiency. The researchers found that when either the maternal grandmother or the maternal grandfather had this Mtrr mutation, their genetically normal grandchildren were at risk of a wide spectrum of developmental abnormalities. These developmental abnormalities were also seen in the fourth and fifth generations of mice.

Through another experiment which involved transferring the embryo from the third generation into a normal healthy female mouse, they discovered that these developmental abnormalities were not passed down genetically. Instead, the serious defects were the result of epigenetic changes which had been inherited.

Epigenetics is a system which turns genes on and off. It occurs when chemicals, such as methyl groups, bind to the DNA at specific locations to control which genes are expressed and when they are expressed. (Interestingly, the folic acid cycle is required to make sure that the cell has enough methyl groups for normal gene expression.) Epigenetic inheritance refers to the passing of these epigenetic marks from one generation to the next – despite the epigenome, for the most part, being ‘wiped clean’ after each generation.

The researchers hypothesize that, for a yet unknown reason, some of these abnormal epigenetic marks caused by the Mtrr mutation may escape this normal erasure and are inherited by the next generation. If these abnormal epigenetic marks that regulate genes important for development are inherited, then these generations may develop abnormalities as a result of the wrong genes being turned on or off.

“It surprised us to find that the great, great grandchildren of a parent who has had a folic acid deficiency could have health problems as a result – suggesting that the ‘sins of your maternal grandparents’ can have an effect on your development and your risk for disease,” said Dr Watson.

“More importantly, our research shows that disease in general can be inherited through epigenetic means rather than genetic means, which has huge implications for human health. Environmental factors that influence epigenetic patterns – e.g., diet, epigenetic disruptors in the environment such as chemicals, etc. – may also have long term, multigenerational effects.”

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For additional information please contact:

Genevieve Maul, Office of Communications, University of Cambridge Tel: direct, +44 (0) 1223 765542, +44 (0) 1223 332300 Mob: +44 (0) 7774 017464 Email: Genevieve.maul@admin.cam.ac.uk

Notes to editors:

  • The paper ‘Mutation in Folate Metabolism Causes Epigenetic Instability and Transgenerational Effects On Development’ will be published in the 26 September edition of Cell

     

  • Centre for Trophoblast Research, Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, University of Cambridge 

     

  • To view a video of the researchers explaining their study, please go to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dlfg49sjo3U

164th Health Research Report 21 SEP 2013 ( Synopsis )

www.healthresearchreport.me 

 

 

In this Issue:

1. Amino acid with promising anti-diabetic effects

2. Substance that gives grapefruit its flavor and aroma could give insect pests the boot

3. New study discovers copper destroys highly infectious norovirus

4. Codeine could increase users’ sensitivity to pain

5. Research treats the fungus among us with nontoxic medicinal compound

6. Diets Low in Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids May Be a Problem for Youngsters

7. Obese stomachs tell us diets are doomed to fail

8. Red grapes, blueberries may enhance immune function

9. Can vitamin B supplements help stave off stroke?

ScreenHunter_42 Dec. 31 12.07

Health Research Report

164th Issue Date 21 SEP 2013

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm

 www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

 

Designer Molecule Causes AIDS Virus to Destroy Itself

A scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles infecting a colorized human H9 T cell. (Credit: NIAID) FILE PHOTO

A scanning electron micrograph shows HIV particles infecting a colorized human H9 T cell. (Credit: NIAID) FILE PHOTO

by Jessica Berman

Researchers have designed a synthetic molecule that tricks the AIDS virus into destroying itself. The compound, called DAVEI, was developed by researchers at Philadelphia’s Drexel University and causes the deadly pathogen to eject its contents before it can infect human cells.

The AIDS virus uses protein spikes on its surface to fuse to healthy cells. Once attached, the microbe inserts its genetic material, turning the cells into little factories that crank out thousands of copies of HIV.

But DAVEI hijacks the virus, mimicking its interaction with immune system cells. DAVEI binds to the pathogen’s outer coat, triggering a firing mechanism that breaches the wall of the AIDS virus, according to Irwin Chaiken, a researcher in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Drexel’s College of Medicine.

Explaining how DAVEI works, Chaiken said, “so that the contents that are inside the virus that are small enough to go through the pores will go through the pores and leak out. And at that point, the virus shrinks and it becomes inactivated.”

DAVEI was designed by Cameron Abrams, a professor of engineering at Drexel. Abrams envisions using the synthetic agent in a microbicide, a cream or gel that women can use vaginally to protect themselves from contracting the disease from their HIV-infected partners.

“And so this we think this would benefit primarily populations in sub-Saharan Africa where male-to-female transmission is very high rate, young women are being infected at a very high rate. That’s extremely detrimental to those societies,” said Abrams.

Abrams also says DAVEI might be used someday as a treatment for those who are HIV positive by destroying infected cells.

“In an active infection in an individual, there are cells that are continuously producing virus. And if those cells could be destroyed before they produce a lot of virus that obviously would be very good,” Abrams pointed out.

Researchers say much more work needs to be done with DAVEI and compounds like it before actual anti-HIV therapies could be developed. An article on the manmade molecule was published in the October edition of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

 

http://www.voanews.com/content/designer-molecule-causes-aids-virus-destroy-itself/1753479.html

Healthy living can turn our cells’ clock back / telomeres regrow

 

Healthy living can reverse the telltale signs of ageing in your cells.

The finding relates to telomeres, the caps that protect the tips of chromosomes when cells divide. With each cell division these get shorter, so as we age they wear away like a candle wick burning down. Now there is evidence that telomeres can regrow if people switch to, and maintain, a healthy lifestyle.

The study involved 10 men in their early 60s, who were asked to follow a strict healthy living regime. They ate a meat-free diet, exercised for 30 minutes a day, did an hour of yoga and meditation a day, and attended group therapy sessions each week.

After five years, the telomeres on a type of white blood cell were on average 10 per cent longer in these men than at the start of the study. In contrast, 25 men who kept to their usual lifestyles saw telomeres on the same cells shrink by an average of 3 per cent over the same period.

The researchers also found that the more strictly the 10 men stuck to the healthy regime, the longer their telomeres became.

“It’s a very encouraging finding,” says Dean Ornish of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, who led the study. “In a biological sense, they are getting younger, but what the long-term implications are we don’t know,” he says.

Tale of the telomeres

Previous studies comparing telomere lengths in individuals against the population as a whole suggest that shorter telomeres are linked with ill health, including heart disease, dementia and cancer, and also with a shorter lifespan.

Telomeres are known to regenerate in stem cells and in some cancer cells, but this study is the first to show that a specific lifestyle change can make them do so in ordinary cells.

“These results are very nice, and hold promise for preventive medicine,” says Maria Blasco, head of the telomere group at Spain’s National Cancer Research Centre in Madrid.  Earlier this year, her group published results showing that telomeres grow in mice fed calorie-restricted diets while they shrink in mice on standard diets.

However, not everyone is convinced by the telomere data. “The [same] methods used to measure telomere length in an earlier paper have been called into question,” says Carol Greider of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, whose discovery of telomerase earned her a share of the Nobel prize in 2009. “It’s not clear if very small changes are real, or normal fluctuation in noisy data,” she says.

Journal reference: The Lancet, DOI: 10.1016/S1470-2045(13)70366-8

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn24208-healthy-living-can-turn-our-cells-clock-back.html#.Ujk8qcHn_Vh

 

Video – Health Research Reports 9 SEP 2013

Topics:
Arginine performs as well as established drugs for Diabetes
* American Scientific journal Enocrinology Sep 2013
Nutritional Supplements reduce hospital stays by 21%
* American Journal of Managed Care Sep 2013
Sirtuin in the brain delays the process of aging
* Cell Metabolism Sep 2013
H1N2 influenza vaccine disables the bodies defense against H1N1 Swine flu
* Science Translational Medicine Aug 2013