Panel Recommends ***Against*** Daily Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation for the Primary Prevention of Fractures in Postmenopausal Women

EEV: I had to read the title a few times. They claim that 1 kidney stone per 273 woman over seven years is to great a risk. 2.5% Sup group vs. 2.1 Placebo Group. Hmmmm. I recommend that this taskforce immediately eliminate Vitamin D and Calcium from their diets, to avoid any future possible risk of a kidney stone…In addition to being the healthy  nutrient deficient control group this world desperately needs to see.

Contact: Megan Hanks mhanks@acponline.org 215-351-2656 American College of Physicians

Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Feb. 26, 2013

Embargoed news from Annals of Internal Medicine

1.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends against daily supplementation with doses of vitamin D ≤ 400 IU and calcium ≤ 1,000 mg for the primary prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women living in the community setting. The Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of daily supplementation with higher doses in this population. Evidence also was insufficient to recommend for or against daily vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent fractures in premenopausal women or in men. Fracture prevention in older patients is important because fractures (especially hip fractures) are associated with chronic pain, disability, and increased mortality. One half of all postmenopausal women will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime. Vitamin D and calcium supplements are inexpensive and readily available without a prescription. To form a recommendation, the Task Force commissioned two systematic evidence reviews and a meta-analysis on vitamin D supplementation with or without calcium. Researchers reviewed the evidence to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium on bone health outcomes in community-dwelling adults and the adverse effects of supplementation. Based on the evidence, researchers concluded with moderate certainty that daily supplementation with doses of vitamin D ≤ 400 IU and calcium ≤ 1,000 mg has no net benefit for the primary prevention of fractures, and that it increases the incidence of kidney stones. The recommendation applies to nonistitutionalized, asymptomatic adults without previous history of fractures. In previous recommendations related to fracture prevention, the Task Force recommended screening for osteoporosis in women age 65 or older and in younger women at high risk for fracture. The Task force also recommends vitamin D supplementation to prevent falls in community-dwelling adults age 65 and older who are at increased risk for falls. Task force evidence reviews and recommendation statements can be found at www.annals.org.

Note: For an embargoed PDF, please contact Megan Hanks or Angela Collom. To speak with the author, please contact Ana Fullmer at ana.fullmer@edelman.com or 202-350-6668

Author: Ralph Turchiano

In short, I review clinical research on an almost daily basis. What I post tends to be articles that are relevant to the readers in addition to some curiosities that have intriguing potential. As a hobby, I truly enjoy the puzzle-solving play that statistics and programming as in the python language bring to the table. I just do not enjoy problem-solving, I love problem-solving and the childlike inspiration and exploration of that innocent exhilaration of discovering something new. Enjoy ;-)