Sugar helps cancer cells regulate voltage

Sugar helps cancer cells regulate voltage

Sugar helps cancer cells regulate voltage

Researchers in an attempt to understand why Cancers will hold onto sugar yet not use it as fuel discovered that Cancer Cells use sugar as a sort of voltage regulator.

1. Ca2 -dependent demethylation of phosphatase PP2Ac promotes glucose deprivation–induced cell death independently of inhibiting glycolysis. Science Signaling, 2018; 11 (512): eaam7893 DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.aam7893

Rebuttal to CNN and The Times Claim ” Vitamin pills are a waste of money, experts warn “

Article Title : Vitamin pills are a waste of money, experts warn

I have to admit, they are pretty stupid…. This is the old Meta-Analysis game unfortunately without a peer review prior to a press release, there really is not much to go on. They don’t even have friggin footnotes posted.

The Articles offered no concrete data, nor science to rebuke. Nor was there any peer reviewed documentation ( i.e. per http://www.plosone.org/) (. As with most absolute statements claiming 100% certainty, they are pretty easy to destroy…

To quote them ” One of the research papers involved the retrospective study of 24 previous trials. In total 450,000 people were involved in the trials and the paper concluded that there was no beneficial effect on mortality from taking vitamins.” ” Declaring “case closed”  Wow?

I am sure more info will arise as time unravels the truth… In the meantime here is enough of a salvo to fire across their broadside, and sink the ship of “SS Case Closed”.

Just a quick 10 peer reviewed articles…I would no advise, not relying on any news source that did not attempt to validate it sources such as “The Times” nor “CNN”. Continue reading “Rebuttal to CNN and The Times Claim ” Vitamin pills are a waste of money, experts warn “”

Health Research Report 156 1 JUN 2013 (Synopsis)

 

In this issue:

1.   Coffee consumption associated with reduced risk of autoimmune liver disease

2.   Ginger compounds may be effective in treating asthma symptoms

3.   The compound in the Mediterranean diet that makes cancer cells ‘mortal’

4.   Study finds vitamin C can kill drug-resistant TB

5.   Common Food Supplement Fights Degenerative Brain Disorders

6.   Calcium supplements linked to longer lifespans in women

7.   Soda and illegal drugs cause similar damage to teeth

8.   Changing gut bacteria through diet affects brain function, UCLA study shows

 ScreenHunter_42 Dec. 31 12.07

Vitamin and Herb Stores

Health Research Report

156th Issue Date 1 Jun 2013

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm

 www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.healthresearchreport.me 

 

 

Calcium supplements linked to longer lifespans in women

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery jgingery@endo-society.org 301-941-0240 The Endocrine Society

Study finds calcium-rich diet, supplements provide equal benefits

Chevy Chase, MD—Taking a calcium supplement of up to 1,000 mg per day can help women live longer, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Calcium, an essential nutrient for bone health, is commonly found in dairy products as well as vitamins. Although calcium is an essential nutrient for bone health, past studies have linked calcium supplements to heart disease risk. Researchers analyzing data from the large-scale Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos) sought to clarify this issue and found moderate doses of calcium supplements had a beneficial effect in women.

“Our study found daily use of calcium supplements was associated with a lower risk of death among women,” said the study’s lead author, David Goltzman, MD, of McGill University in Montreal, Canada. “The benefit was seen for women who took doses of up to 1,000 mg per day, regardless of whether the supplement contained vitamin D.”

The longitudinal cohort study monitored the health of 9,033 Canadians between 1995 and 2007. During that period, 1,160 participants died. Although the data showed women who took calcium supplements had a lower mortality risk, there was no statistical benefit for men. The study found no conclusive evidence that vitamin D had an impact on mortality.

“Higher amounts of calcium were potentially linked to longer lifespans in women, regardless of the source of the calcium,” Goltzman said. “That is, the same benefits were seen when the calcium came from dairy foods, non-dairy foods or supplements.”

###

 

Other researchers working on the study include: L. Langsetmo, C. Berger, J. Genest and S. Morin of McGill University; N. Krieger, S. Jamal and R. Josse of the University of Toronto; C. Kovacs of Memorial University in St. John’s, Newfoundland; D. Hanley of the University of Calgary; S. Whiting of the University of Saskatchewan; A. Hodsman of St. Joseph’s Health Center in London, Ontario; J. Prior, B. Lentle and M. Patel of the University of British Columbia; J. Brown of Laval University in Quebec; T. Anastasiades and T. Towheed, of Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario; A. Papaioannou, J. Adachi of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario; W. Leslie of the University of Manitoba; and K. Davison of the University of Victoria in British Columbia.

The article, “Calcium and Vitamin D Intake and Mortality: Results from the Canadian Multi-centre Osteoporosis Study,” will appear in the July 2013 issue of JCEM.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology.  Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 16,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endo-society.org. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

Common osteoporosis drug slows formation of new bone

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery jgingery@endo-society.org 301-941-0240 The Endocrine Society

Study results suggest combination treatments may be needed to stop bone loss, fuel growth

Chevy Chase, MD––Although the drug zoledronic acid slows bone loss in osteoporosis patients, it also boosts levels of a biomarker that stops bone formation, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Osteoporosis weakens bones and increases the risk patients will suffer fractures. The findings suggest combination therapy may be a more effective approach to battling this common condition.

“The key to effectively treating osteoporosis lies in increasing bone mass,” said the study’s lead author, Antonino Catalano, MD, PhD, of the University of Messina in Italy. “Zoledronic acid halts bone loss, but it also signals the body to stop forming new bone mass. The drug may need to be combined with other treatments to add bone mass.”

The prospective intervention study followed the treatment of 40 postmenopausal women at an ambulatory care center. Half of the women received zoledronic acid, and half received a placebo. Levels of sclerostin – a biomarker that inhibits bone formation – increased among the participants who were treated with zoledronic acid.

“The data points to an opportunity to increase bone mass by combining zoledronic acid with a drug that suppresses the resulting sclerostin’s effect,” Catalano said. “An innovative combination therapy using zoledronic acid and selective antibodies to block the sclerostin could simultaneously stop bone loss and encourage new bone formation. This is an important avenue for researchers to explore as they develop new osteoporosis treatments.”

###

 

Other researchers working on the study include: N. Morabito, G. Basile, S. Brancatelli, D. Cucinotta and A. Lasco of the University of Messina.

The article, “Zoledronic Acid Acutely Increases Sclerostin Serum Levels in Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis,” appears in the May 2013 issue of JCEM.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology.  Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 16,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endo-society.org. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

Panel Recommends ***Against*** Daily Vitamin D and Calcium Supplementation for the Primary Prevention of Fractures in Postmenopausal Women

EEV: I had to read the title a few times. They claim that 1 kidney stone per 273 woman over seven years is to great a risk. 2.5% Sup group vs. 2.1 Placebo Group. Hmmmm. I recommend that this taskforce immediately eliminate Vitamin D and Calcium from their diets, to avoid any future possible risk of a kidney stone…In addition to being the healthy  nutrient deficient control group this world desperately needs to see.

Contact: Megan Hanks mhanks@acponline.org 215-351-2656 American College of Physicians

Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Feb. 26, 2013

Embargoed news from Annals of Internal Medicine

1.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends against daily supplementation with doses of vitamin D ≤ 400 IU and calcium ≤ 1,000 mg for the primary prevention of fractures in postmenopausal women living in the community setting. The Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of daily supplementation with higher doses in this population. Evidence also was insufficient to recommend for or against daily vitamin D and calcium supplementation to prevent fractures in premenopausal women or in men. Fracture prevention in older patients is important because fractures (especially hip fractures) are associated with chronic pain, disability, and increased mortality. One half of all postmenopausal women will have an osteoporosis-related fracture in their lifetime. Vitamin D and calcium supplements are inexpensive and readily available without a prescription. To form a recommendation, the Task Force commissioned two systematic evidence reviews and a meta-analysis on vitamin D supplementation with or without calcium. Researchers reviewed the evidence to assess the effects of vitamin D and calcium on bone health outcomes in community-dwelling adults and the adverse effects of supplementation. Based on the evidence, researchers concluded with moderate certainty that daily supplementation with doses of vitamin D ≤ 400 IU and calcium ≤ 1,000 mg has no net benefit for the primary prevention of fractures, and that it increases the incidence of kidney stones. The recommendation applies to nonistitutionalized, asymptomatic adults without previous history of fractures. In previous recommendations related to fracture prevention, the Task Force recommended screening for osteoporosis in women age 65 or older and in younger women at high risk for fracture. The Task force also recommends vitamin D supplementation to prevent falls in community-dwelling adults age 65 and older who are at increased risk for falls. Task force evidence reviews and recommendation statements can be found at www.annals.org.

Note: For an embargoed PDF, please contact Megan Hanks or Angela Collom. To speak with the author, please contact Ana Fullmer at ana.fullmer@edelman.com or 202-350-6668

Calcium during pregnancy reduces harmful blood lead levels: 1200mg –>31% Reduction

Contact: Laura Bailey baileylm@umich.edu 734-764-1552 University of Michigan

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—Pregnant women who take high levels of daily calcium supplements show a marked reduction in lead levels in their blood, suggesting calcium could play a critical role in reducing fetal and infant exposure.

A new study at the University of Michigan shows that women who take 1,200 milligrams of calcium daily have up to a 31 percent reduction in lead levels.

Women who used lead-glazed ceramics and those with high bone lead levels showed the largest reductions; the average reduction was about 11 percent, said Howard Hu, chair of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at the School of Public Health.

Hu is the principal investigator of the study and one of the senior authors on the paper, which is available online in Environmental Health Perspectives, the official journal of the U.S. National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences. Hu, who is also affiliated with the University of Michigan School of Medicine, said this is the first known randomized study examining calcium supplementation on lead levels in pregnant women.

“We and others have previously shown that during pregnancy, mothers can transfer lead from their bones to their unborn — with significant adverse consequences–making maternal bone lead stores a threat even if current environmental lead exposures are low,” Hu said.  “This study demonstrates that dietary calcium supplementation during pregnancy may constitute a low-cost and low-risk approach for reducing this threat.”

Lead exposure is a great concern for pregnant and lactating women, especially in developing countries where lead exposures have been high until recently, and for women with occupational exposure. Developing fetuses and nursing babies are exposed to lead from either current exposures to mothers or from the mobilization of maternal skeletal lead stores accumulated from prior years of exposure. Bone lead can stay in the body for decades, so even with minimal environmental exposure, the fetus or nursing infant can still be at great risk from maternal stores of lead.

Lead exposure during fetal development and infancy can cause low birth weight or slow weight gain after birth, cognitive defects such as lower intelligence scores, lower motor and visual skills, or even miscarriage. Damage from lead exposure and poisoning is usually permanent.

“The bottom line is that obstetricians and pediatricians should consider adding calcium supplementation to the prenatal vitamins normally recommended in pregnant women, particularly if their patients have a significant history of environmental or occupational lead exposure,” Hu said.

The study showed that reductions in blood lead levels were more evident in the second trimester at 14 percent than in the third trimester at 8 percent. The most compliant group of women in the study (those who consumed greater than 75 percent of the assigned 1,200 milligram doses of calcium per day) showed a 24 percent decrease.  Women in the most compliant group who also reported using lead glazed ceramics and had the highest bone lead levels saw the greatest reduction of 31 percent.

Researchers analyzed 557 women recruited from the Mexican Social Security Institute prenatal clinics, which treat the low to moderate income population of Mexico City. All were in their first trimester; roughly half were assigned calcium and half a placebo.

This recent study corresponds with a previous study performed by the same group of investigators showing that 1,200-milligram daily calcium supplementation during lactation reduced maternal blood lead by 15-20 percent, and breast milk lead by 5-10 percent. This is the first randomized trial to evaluate the effect of supplementation during pregnancy, when lead is more easily transferred to the fetus, Hu said.

###

Co-authors and affiliations include: Adrienne S. Ettinger,  Harvard School of Public Health and U-M SPH; Héctor Lamadrid-Figueroa, Martha M. Téllez-Rojo, and Adriana Mercado- García, Mexican National Institute of Public Health; Karen E. Peterson, Harvard SPH and U-M SPH; Joel Schwartz, Harvard SPH;  Mauricio Hernández-Avila, Mexican National Institute of Public Health and Mexican Ministry of Health

The study is available at: http://www.ehponline.org/docs/2008/11868/abstract.html

For more on Hu, visit: http://www.ns.umich.edu/htdocs/public/experts/ExpDisplay.php?ExpID=1188http://www.sph.umich.edu/iscr/faculty/profile.cfm?uniqname=howardhu

For more on the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at U-M SPH, see: http://www.sph.umich.edu/ehs/

The University of  Michigan  School of Public Health has been promoting health and preventing  disease since 1941, and is consistently ranked among the nation’s top five public health schools.  Faculty and students in the school’s five academic departments and dozens of collaborative centers and initiatives study and solve problems relating to chronic disease, health care quality and finance, emerging genetic technologies, climate change, socioeconomic inequalities and their impact on health, infectious disease, the globalization of health, and more. Whether making new discoveries in the lab or researching and educating in the field, our faculty, students, and alumni are deployed around the globe to promote and protect our health.  See:http://www.sph.umich.edu/