‘Alarmingly high’ risk of death for people with opioid use disorder in general medical care

Public Release: 24-Apr-2017 Wolters Kluwer Health April 24, 2017 – Almost one-fifth of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) in a large healthcare system died during a four-year follow-up period, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). The journal is published by…

How to hack a cell

Public Release: 4-Apr-2017   Boston University engineer programs living cells Boston University College of Engineering   The human body is made up of trillions of cells, microscopic computers that carry out complex behaviors according to the signals they receive from each other and their environment. Synthetic biologists engineer living cells to control how they behave…

‘Harmless’ painkillers associated with up to 50% increased risk of cardiac arrest

Public Release: 15-Mar-2017 Researchers advise avoiding diclofenac and limiting ibuprofen to 1200 mg per day European Society of Cardiology Sophia Antipolis, 15 March 2017: Painkillers considered harmless by the general public are associated with increased risk of cardiac arrest, according to research published today in the March issue of European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy.1…

Popular heartburn drugs linked to gradual yet ‘silent’ kidney damage

Public Release: 22-Feb-2017   Most patients don’t experience acute kidney problems beforehand Washington University in St. Louis   Caption Taking popular heartburn medication for prolonged periods may lead to serious kidney damage, even in people who show no signs of kidney problems, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and…

Food additive found in candy, gum could alter digestive cell structure and function, titanium dioxide

Public Release: 16-Feb-2017   Small intestinal cells hindered by chronic exposure to common food additive Binghamton University   Caption Researchers exposed a small intestinal cell culture model to the physiological equivalent of a meal’s worth of titanium oxide nanoparticles — 30 nanometers across — over four hours (acute exposure), or three meal’s worth over five…

Deaths due to medical error in US hospitals estimated to be greater than 200,000 deaths per year

Public Release: 13-Feb-2017 Preventing hospital-related deaths due to medical errors — ‘We can and must do better’ Wolters Kluwer Health   February 13, 2017 – How many patients die in the hospital as a result of preventable medical errors? While debate continues over estimates based on flawed data, the US healthcare system can and must…

Survival rates for people suffering from heart failure have not improved since 1998

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017 Heart failure survival rates show no improvement Oxford University Press USA Survival rates for people suffering from heart failure have not improved since 1998, according to a study led by University of Oxford researchers. Published in Family Practice, the research was funded by the United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health Research School…

Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice

Public Release: 25-Jan-2017   Stanford University Medical Center   Rat-grown mouse pancreases help reverse diabetes in mice, say researchers at Stanford, University of Tokyo Mouse pancreases grown in rats generate functional, insulin-producing cells that can reverse diabetes when transplanted into mice with the disease, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and…

Antibiotics, not dirty hospitals, the main cause of C. difficile epidemic

Public Release: 24-Jan-2017   University of Oxford   The study concluded that overuse of antibiotics like ciprofloxacin led to the outbreak of severe diarrhoea caused by C. difficile that hit headlines from 2006 onwards. The outbreak was stopped by substantially reducing use of ciprofloxacin and related antibiotics. Inappropriate use and widespread over prescribing of fluoroquinolone…

Psychological ‘vaccine’ could help immunize public against ‘fake news’ on climate change

Public Release: 22-Jan-2017   University of Cambridge   In medicine, vaccinating against a virus involves exposing a body to a weakened version of the threat, enough to build a tolerance. Social psychologists believe that a similar logic can be applied to help “inoculate” the public against misinformation, including the damaging influence of ‘fake news’ websites…