One in three college freshmen worldwide reports mental health disorder

Public Release: 13-Sep-2018 Students from 19 colleges in eight countries report symptoms consistent with psychological disorder, study says American Psychological Association As if college were not difficult enough, more than one-third of first-year university students in eight industrialized countries around the globe report symptoms consistent with a diagnosable mental health disorder, according to research published…

Researcher links diplomats’ mystery illness to radiofrequency/microwave radiation

Public Release: 29-Aug-2018   University of California – San Diego Writing in advance of the September 15 issue of Neural Computation, Beatrice Golomb, MD, PhD, professor of medicine at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, says publicly reported symptoms and experiences of a “mystery illness” afflicting American and Canadian diplomats in Cuba and…

Hospital-associated bacterial species becoming tolerant to alcohol disinfectants

Public Release: 1-Aug-2018   American Association for the Advancement of Science A multidrug-resistant bacterial species that can cause infections in hospitals is becoming increasingly tolerant to the alcohols used in handwash disinfectants, a new study finds. The analysis of bacterial samples taken from two Australian hospitals over 19 years suggests that the species Enterococcus faecium…

Amyloid beta protein protects brain from herpes infection by entrapping viral particles

Public Release: 5-Jul-2018 Chronic viral infection could induce overproduction of Alzheimer’s-disease-associated protein and cause damaging inflammation Massachusetts General Hospital A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) study has found the mechanism by which amyloid beta (A-beta) – the protein deposited into plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease – protects from the effects of herpes…

Consciousness is partly preserved during general anesthesia

Public Release: 3-Jul-2018 University of Turku When people are administered an anaesthetic, they seem to lose consciousness – or at least they stop reacting to their environment. But is consciousness lost fully during anaesthesia or does consciousness persist in the brain but in an altered state? This question has been explored in the joint research…

Why being left-handed matters for mental health treatment

Public Release: 18-Jun-2018 Cornell University ITHACA, N.Y. – Treatment for the most common mental health problems could be ineffective or even detrimental to about 50 percent of the population, according to a radical new model of emotion in the brain. Since the 1970s, hundreds of studies have suggested that each hemisphere of the brain is…

Genes found only in humans influence brain size

Public Release: 31-May-2018 New genes arose in human ancestors just before a dramatic increase in brain size and are involved in genetic defects associated with neurological disorders University of California – Santa Cruz IMAGE: Researchers studied the effects of NOTCH2NL genes in cortical organoids grown from human embryonic stem cells. Immunofluorescence staining shows markers for…

Smarter brains run on sparsely connected neurons

Public Release: 17-May-2018 Princeton researchers crowdsource brain mapping with gamers, discover 6 new neuron types Caption By turning a time-intensive research problem into an interactive game, Princeton neuroscientist Sebastian Seung has built an unprecedented data set of neurons, which he is now turning over to the public via the Eyewire Museum. These 17 retinal neurons,…

UCLA biologists ‘transfer’ a memory

Public Release: 14-May-2018   Research in marine snails could lead to new treatments to restore memories and alter traumatic ones University of California – Los Angeles IMAGE: This is David Glanzman holding a marine snail. Credit: Christelle Snow/UCLA UCLA biologists report they have transferred a memory from one marine snail to another, creating an artificial…

Oral antibiotics linked to increased kidney stone risk for several years after use

PUBLIC RELEASE: 10-MAY-2018 Risk appears to be highest among children AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY Highlights Use of oral antibiotics was linked with an increased risk of developing kidney stones. Risk decreased over time but was still elevated several years after antibiotic use. Risk was highest for young patients. Washington, DC May 10, 2018) — The…