‘In many cases Americans can do better on benefits than in an entry level job': Data shows more than a THIRD of the U.S. is on welfare handouts Reply

 

Around 110 million Americans are now on government welfare benefits
This equates to more than one third of the country relying on handouts
At least 51 million are using food stamps and 83 million are on Medicaid
Analysts are calling for the minimum wage to be increased to $10.10 an hour

By Jenny Awford for MailOnline

Published: 11:24 EST, 29 August 2014 | Updated: 14:54 EST, 29 August 2014

Around 110 million Americans are now receiving government assistance, one third of the country

A third of Americans are now on welfare benefits, prompting calls to raise the minimum wage and encourage more people to stay in work.

New census data has revealed that around 110 million Americans are receiving government assistance of some kind.

The number includes people receiving ‘means-tested’ federal benefits and subsidies based on income.

Federal welfare was administered through the n...

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An inconvenient truth: Does responsible consumption benefit corporations more than society? Reply

Are environmental and social problems such as global warming and poverty the result of inadequate governmental regulations or does the burden fall on our failure as consumers to make better consumption choices? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, responsible consumption shifts the burden for solving global problems from governments to consumers and ultimately benefits corporations more than society.

“When businesses convince politicians to encourage responsible consumption instead of implementing policy changes to solve environmental and social problems, business earns the license to create new markets while all of the pressure to solve the problem at hand falls on the individual consumer. For example, global warming is blamed on consumers unwilling to make greener choices rather than the failure of governments to regulate markets to the benefit of society and the environment,” write authors Markus Giesler and Ela Veresiu (both York University).

Davos, Switzelrand, Klaus Schwab, Founder and ...

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China can weigh reconnaissance on US Reply

(Global Times) 08:16, August 28, 2014

China and the US started a two-day meeting at the Pentagon on Wednesday to negotiate a code of conduct on the high seas, in the wake of a Chinese fighter jet intercepting a US spy plane near the Hainan Island. Although the meeting was set up before this incident, it is believed the near-miss will make a difference during the negotiations.
Given the fact that Washington’s determination to continue its short-range surveillance of China is as strong as China’s commitment to drive US planes away, whether the 2001 mid-air collision could recur has become a Sword of Damocles above their heads.
The new strategic trajectory of Asia-Pacific, namely China is growing stronger and a containment circle drawn by the US and its allies is taking shape, is changing the mindsets of both sides to define specific conflicts. If the 2001 incident happened again, the possibility of an all-out crisis between both sides will increase.

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Stonehenge gets more Mysterious, New Monuments Discovered Underneath it Reply

Wednesday, 27 August 2014

The mystery surrounding Stonehenge has suddenly deepened — literally. A first-of-its-kind study suggests that 15 previously undiscovered or poorly understood monuments lie hidden under the ancient stone monument and its surroundings.

For the study, researchers used a variety of techniques — including ground-penetrating radar and 3D laser scanning — to create a highly detailed subsurface map of the entire area. According to a release from the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Archaeological Prospection and Virtual Archaeology, one of the partners in the study, the technologies are notable for being much less destructive than traditional, digging-based exploratory techniques.

A full map of the project’s findings is to be presented September 9 at the British Science Festival in Birmingham, England. (David Preiss)

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Autism-Vaccine Cover-up Snowballs as Whistleblower’s Identity is Revealed—LATEST UPDATES Reply

William W. Thompson, PhD—an epidemiologist at the CDC’s National Center of Birth Defects and Development Disabilities is alleging criminal wrongdoing on the part of his supervisors, and has expressed deep regret about his role in helping the CDC hide data: “It’s the lowest point in my career, that I went along with that paper.”

 

Posted By ANH-USA On August 26, 2014 @ 3:00 pm

Rumors are swirling as the world learns of the government’s deception. Here’s what we know for sure.

William W. Thompson, PhD—an epidemiologist at the CDC’s National Center of Birth Defects and Development Disabilities who received his doctorate in biochemical engineering—has been revealed as the CDC whistleblower. Thompson broke a decade of silence over the government’s deliberate concealment of the link between the MMR vaccine (for measles, mumps, and rubella) and a dramatically increased risk of autism, particularly in African American boys.

Thompson is alleging criminal wrongdoing on the part of his supervisors, and has expressed deep regret about his role in helping the CDC hide data: “It’s the lowest point in my career, that I went along with that paper.”

Here is a quick timeline of the scandal:

English: Preparation of measles vaccine at the...

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Hacking Gmail with 92 Percent Success Reply

UCR Today: Android Hacking//

illustration of smart phones and skull

 

UC Riverside assistant professor is among group that develops novel method to attack apps on Android, and likely other, operating systems

By Sean Nealon on August 20, 2014

 

illustration of smart phones and skull
A team of engineers have developed a method that allows them to successfully hack into apps up to 92 percent of the time.

RIVERSIDE, Calif. (www.ucr.edu) — A team of researchers, including an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering, have identified a weakness believed to exist in Android, Windows and iOS mobile operating systems that could be used to obtain personal information from unsuspecting users. They demonstrated the hack in an Android phone.

The researchers tested the method and found it was successful between 82 percent and 92 percent of the time on six of the seven popular apps they tested. Among the apps they easily hacked were Gmail, CHASE Bank and H&R Block. Amazon, with a 48 percent success rate, was the only app they tested that was difficult to penetrate. More…

Viruses take down massive algal blooms, with big implications for climate Reply

Algae might seem easy to ignore, but they are the ultimate source of all organic matter that marine animals depend upon. Humans are increasingly dependent on algae, too, to suck up climate-warming carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and sink it to the bottom of the ocean. Now, by using a combination of satellite imagery and laboratory experiments, researchers have evidence showing that viruses infecting those algae are driving the life-and-death dynamics of the algae’s blooms, even when all else stays essentially the same, and this has important implications for our climate.

Location and Biophysical Characteristics of the Study Area

Caption: This is a location map. Black rectangle delineates the area shown in Figures 1B and 2. (B) Map of surface chlorophyll from June 22, 2012 (day 174), emphasizing the phytoplankton patch as a distinct area of high chlorophyll concentration. Thick black lines mark the main attracting Lagrangian coherent structures from calculation of finite-size Lyapunov exponents. To facilitate the presentation, we plotted only the highest 20 percent of FSLEs (for the entire FSLE field, see Figure 2C). Thin black contour outline region of strong Chl gradient is used to define patch boundaries. Magenta diamonds mark the position of Argo floats used for extracting the mixed layer depth in the patch vicinity. Green diamonds mark the location of the sampling stations. More…

Research Paves Way for Development of Cyborg Moth ‘Biobots’ Reply

Matt Shipman | News Services | 919.515.6386

Dr. Alper Bozkurt | 919.515.7349

Release Date: 08.20.14

North Carolina State University researchers have developed methods for electronically manipulating the flight muscles of moths and for monitoring the electrical signals moths use to control those muscles. The work opens the door to the development of remotely-controlled moths, or “biobots,” for use in emergency response.

“In the big picture, we want to know whether we can control the movement of moths for use in applications such as search and rescue operations,” says Dr. Alper Bozkurt, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State and co-author of a paper on the work. “The idea would be to attach sensors to moths in order to create a flexible, aerial sensor network that can identify survivors or public health hazards in the wake of a disaster.”

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New home for an ‘evolutionary misfit’ Reply

Hallucigenia Reconstruction

Worm-like creature with legs and spikes finds its place in the evolutionary tree of life

One of the most bizarre-looking fossils ever found – a worm-like creature with legs, spikes and a head difficult to distinguish from its tail – has found its place in the evolutionary Tree of Life, definitively linking it with a group of modern animals for the first time.

The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered an important link with modern velvet worms, also known as onychophorans, a relatively small group of worm-like animals that live in tropical forests. The results are published in the advance online edition of the journal Nature.

The affinity of Hallucigenia and other contemporary ‘legged worms’, collectively known as lobopodians, has been very controversial, as a lack of clear characteristics linking them to each other or to modern animals has made it difficult to determine their evolutionary home. More…