COVID-19 Made worse By Social Distancing?

We are led to question whether the recommended social distancing measures to prevent SARS-CoV-2 transmission could increase the number of other serious instabilities. The breaking of the contagion pathways reduces the sharing of microorganisms between people, thus favoring dysbiosis, which, in turn, may increase the poor prognosis of the disease. #covid #microbiome #dysbiosis Célia P. F. Domingues, João S. Rebelo, Francisco Dionisio, Ana Botelho, Teresa Nogueira. The Social Distancing Imposed To Contain COVID-19 Can Affect Our Microbiome: a Double-Edged Sword in Human Health. mSphere, 2020; 5 (5) DOI: 10.1128/mSphere.00716-20 https://msphere.asm.org/content/5/5/e00716-20

Organically and Conventionally grown Apples are very different

Organically and Conventionally grown Apples are very different

Organically and Conventionally grown Apples are very different

“Escherichia-Shigella — a group of bacteria that includes known pathogens — was found in most of the conventional apple samples, but none from organic apples. For beneficial Lactobacilli — of probiotic fame — the reverse was true.” And there may even be vindication for those who can “taste the difference” in organic produce.

#Apple #organic #conventional

Birgit Wassermann, Henry Müller, Gabriele Berg. An Apple a Day: Which Bacteria Do We Eat With Organic and Conventional Apples? Frontiers in Microbiology, 2019; 10 DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2019.01629

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmicb.2019.01629/full

Performance-enhancing bacteria may increase performance by 13%

Performance-enhancing bacteria may increase performance by 13%

They pinpointed one specific group of bacteria, called Veillonella, that they found was enriched in the gut microbiome of Boston Marathon runners after after completing the 26.2 race and in an independent group of 87 elite and Olympic athletes after competitions. Veillonella bacteria isolated from marathon athletes and given to mice increased the animals’ performances in laboratory treadmill tests by 13% compared to control bacteria.

Jonathan Scheiman, Jacob M. Luber, Theodore A. Chavkin, Tara MacDonald, Angela Tung, Loc-Duyen Pham, Marsha C. Wibowo, Renee C. Wurth, Sukanya Punthambaker, Braden T. Tierney, Zhen Yang, Mohammad W. Hattab, Julian Avila-Pacheco, Clary B. Clish, Sarah Lessard, George M. Church, Aleksandar D. Kostic. Meta-omics analysis of elite athletes identifies a performance-enhancing microbe that functions via lactate metabolism. Nature Medicine, 2019; DOI: 10.1038/s41591-019-0485-4

 

https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-06/wifb-dop062419.php#.XRFT17SisbI.wordpress

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190624111441.htm

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0485-4

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome

Lupus strongly linked to imbalances in gut microbiome

The new study, publishing in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases online Feb. 19, showed that 61 women diagnosed with SLE had roughly five times more gut bacteria known as Ruminococcus gnavus, than 17 women of similar ages and racial backgrounds who did not have the disease and were healthy.

Alternatively, Silverman says, new treatments could also be used to promote growth of Bacteroides uniformis, bacteria thought to hinder growth of R. gnavus in the gut…..

#lupus #microbiome #Ruminococcus

Doua Azzouz, Aidana Omarbekova, Adriana Heguy, Dominik Schwudke, Nicolas Gisch, Brad H. Rovin, Roberto Caricchio, Jill P. Buyon, Alexander V. Alekseyenko, Gregg J. Silverman. Lupus nephritis is linked to disease-activity associated expansions and immunity to a gut commensal. Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 2019; annrheumdis-2018-214856 DOI: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2018-214856

https://ard.bmj.com/content/early/2019/03/01/annrheumdis-2018-214856

Flaxseed Fiber Surprising benefits for Metabolism and Overall health

Flaxseed Fiber Surprising benefits for Metabolism and Overall health

 

“Our data suggest that flaxseed fiber supplementation affects host metabolism by increasing energy expenditure and reducing obesity as well as by improving glucose tolerance. Future research should be directed to understand relative contribution of the different microbes and delineate underlying mechanisms for how flaxseed fibers affect host metabolism,” the researchers wrote.
#flaxseed #metabolism #fermentable

Tulika Arora, Olga Rudenko, Kristoffer Lihme Egerod, Anna Sofie Husted, Petia Kovatcheva-Datchary, Rozita Akrami, Mette Kristensen, Thue W. Schwartz, Fredrik Bäckhed. Microbial fermentation of flaxseed fibers modulates the transcriptome of GPR41-expressing enteroendocrine cells and protects mice against diet-induced obesity. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 2018; DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00391.2018

https://www.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/ajpendo.00391.2018

Kefir may help Hypertension and Neuroinflammation

Kefir may help Hypertension and Neuroinflammation

Kefir may help Hypertension and Neuroinflammation

Drinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system.

Probiotic Kefir Antihypertensive Effects in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Involves Central and Peripheral Mechanisms

Mirian A. Silva-Cutini, Sarah C. Peaden, Francesca E. Mowry, Henri A.G. Ducray, Ludmila P. Globa, Iryna B. Sorokulova, Tadeu U. Andrade, and Vinicia C. Biancardi

The FASEB Journal 2018 32:1_supplement, 924.2-924.2

Your body’s microbiome has a unique ‘fingerprint’

Contact: Suzanne Price sprice@nutrition.org 617-954-3976 Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Study suggests increasing complexity of gut effect on health

Boston, MA—The microbiome is your body’s set of microbial communities; microbial cells outnumber human cells roughly ten to one. Through studying the microbiome, scientists are learning more the relationship between these microbes and human health and disease. In looking at the effect of diet on the composition of the gut microbiome, Dr. Nanette Steinle of the University of Maryland’s School of Medicine and Dr. Emmanuel Mongodin of the University of Maryland Institute of Genome Sciences wanted to determine if the Mediterranean diet would cause changes in an individual’s microbiome. This diet was selected because it has already been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

In this small study, 8 women and 1 man ages 50-65 were provided with foods that fit the Mediterranean diet profile: high fiber, whole grains, dry beans/lentils, olive oil, and 5 servings of fruits/vegetables a day. After 2 weeks, they provided blood for the analysis of fasting lipids and stool samples to determine the microbes present.

The results indicated a decrease in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels. In addition, there was clustering of individuals’ microbial profiles.

“What we expected to find was that a particular microbe species increased, but we haven’t observed that,” said Steinle. “Instead, each individual appears to have a unique microbiome signature, like a fingerprint. A sample from 5 people would result in 5 unique profiles. It’s the first time we’ve observed that this signature remained true, even after manipulation of diet,” Steinle added.

This study adds another clue to the complicated nature of the gut microbiome. Dr. Steinle will present the data for the American Society for Nutrition’s poster sessions on Tuesday, April 23. Prior to the poster session on the microbiome on April 23, there is a symposium “Managing the Microbiome in Human Gastrointestinal Disease” on Saturday, April 20, 8-10 am.

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This study was partially funded by the Dry Bean Health Research Program.