Elderberry shown to fight Influenza at multiple stages

Elderberry shown to fight Influenza at multiple stages Elderberry shown to fight Influenza at multiple stages The phytochemicals from the elderberry juice were shown to be effective at stopping the virus infecting the cells, however to the surprise of the researchers they were even more effective at inhibiting viral propagation at later stages of the…

From friend to foe: How benign bacteria evolve to virulent pathogens

Contact: Isabel Gordo igordo@igc.gulbenkian.pt 351-214-407-915 Public Library of Science Bacteria can evolve rapidly to adapt to environmental change. When the “environment” is the immune response of an infected host, this evolution can turn harmless bacteria into life-threatening pathogens. A study published on December 12 in PLOS Pathogens provides insight into how this happens. Isabel Gordo…

Self-medication in animals much more widespread than believed

Contact: Jim Erickson ericksn@umich.edu 734-647-1842 University of Michigan ANN ARBOR—It’s been known for decades that animals such as chimpanzees seek out medicinal herbs to treat their diseases. But in recent years, the list of animal pharmacists has grown much longer, and it now appears that the practice of animal self-medication is a lot more widespread…

Designer bacteria may lead to better vaccines: Contaminated vaccines work better!!!

Contact: Daniel Oppenheimer daniel.oppenheimer@utexas.edu 512-745-3353 University of Texas at Austin Designer bacteria may lead to better vaccines 61 new strains of genetically engineered bacteria may improve the efficacy of vaccines for diseases such as flu, pertussis, cholera and HPV AUSTIN, Texas — Researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a menu of…

Man’s best friend: Common canine virus may lead to new vaccines for deadly human diseases

Public Affairs News Service Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012 Writer: James  E.  Hataway, 706/542-5222, jhataway@uga.edu Contact: Biao He, 706/542-2855, bhe@uga.edu Athens, Ga. – Researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered that a virus commonly found in dogs may serve as the foundation for the next great breakthrough in human vaccine development. Although harmless in humans,…

Zinc supplementation significantly increases activation of the cells (T cells) responsible for destroying viruses and bacteria

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Cody Mooneyhan cmooneyhan@faseb.org 301-634-7104 Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Got zinc? New zinc research suggests novel therapeutic targets New report in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology suggests that zinc activates a key protein on T cells needed to fight infections Everyone knows that vitamins “from A to…

Dioxins in Food Chain Linked to Breastfeeding Ills

2009 study posted for filing Exposure to dioxins during pregnancy harms the cells in rapidly-changing breast tissue, which may explain why some women have trouble breastfeeding or don’t produce enough milk, according to a University of Rochester Medical Center study. Researchers believe their findings, although only demonstrated in mice at this point, begin to address…

No Antibodies, No Problem

    Researchers Identify How Mosquito Immune System Attacks Specific Infections   Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have determined a new mechanism by which the mosquitoes’ immune system can respond with specificity to infections with various pathogens, including the parasite that causes malaria in humans, using one single gene. Unlike…

Herpesvirus: To Vaccinate or Not To Vaccinate Scientists Weigh Risks and Benefits: Herpesvirus gives resistance to infection with bacterial pathogens

2009 report posted for filing   Saranac Lake, N.Y., -Dr. Marcia Blackman and her research team at the Trudeau Institute have followed up on an intriguing report(1)published in the journal Nature in May 2007 by Dr. Herbert Virgin, et al., showing that mice persistently infected with certain forms of herpesvirus, which can establish lifelong latent…

Zinc deficiency mechanism linked to aging, multiple diseases: animals given about 10 times their dietary requirement for zinc, the biomarkers of inflammation were restored to those of young animals.

10-1-12 Media Release Zinc deficiency mechanism linked to aging, multiple diseases CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new study has outlined for the first time a biological mechanism by which zinc deficiency can develop with age, leading to a decline of the immune system and increased inflammation associated with many health problems, including cancer, heart disease, autoimmune…

Prenatal Damage from Dioxin Shown to Involve microRNAs

ScienceDaily (Sep. 17, 2012) — Research carried out at the University of South Carolina has identified novel mechanisms through which dioxin, a well-known environmental contaminant, can alter physiological functions, according to a study published online in the journal PLOS ONE. The research team, which included Narendra Singh, Mitzi Nagarkatti and Prakash Nagarkatti of the USC…

Plant flavonoid found to reduce inflammatory response in the brain: luteolin

Contact: Diana Yates diya@illinois.edu 217-333-5802 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign IMAGE:Animal sciences professor Rodney Johnson, and graduate student Saebyeol Jang found that a plant flavonoid, luteolin, inhibited a key pathway in the inflammatory response of microglia. Click here for more information.  Researchers at the University of Illinois report this week that a plant compound found…