Muscle Mass and Vitamin C

“We know that Vitamin C consumption is linked with skeletal muscle mass. It helps defend the cells and tissues that make up the body from potentially harmful free radical substances. Unopposed these free radicals can contribute to the destruction of muscle, thus speeding up age-related decline.”

#vitaminc #muscle #skeletalmuscle

  1. Lucy N Lewis, Richard P G Hayhoe, Angela A Mulligan, Robert N Luben, Kay-Tee Khaw, Ailsa A Welch. Lower Dietary and Circulating Vitamin C in Middle- and Older-Aged Men and Women Are Associated with Lower Estimated Skeletal Muscle Mass. The Journal of Nutrition, 2020; DOI: 10.1093/jn/nxaa221

https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/150/10/2789/5897318

sarcopenia, skeletal muscle, frailty, vitamin C, ascorbic acid, muscle mass, muscle loss, aging, gain muscle, muscle growth, body mass index, diet ,frailty, skeletal muscles, plasma, ascorbic acid, sarcopenia, calcium ascorbate,

Black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation, allergies

Prebiotics may help activate anti-tumor immunity

Prebiotics may help activate anti-tumor immunity

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system’s ability to fight cancer. In contrast to probiotics, which are live bacterial strains, prebiotics are “food” for bacteria and stimulate the growth of diverse beneficial populations. The study, published today in Cell Reports, provides further evidence that gut microbes have a role in shaping the immune response to cancer, and supports efforts to target the gut microbiome to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy.

#inulin #prebiotics #cancer

Prebiotic-Induced Anti-tumor Immunity Attenuates Tumor Growth

Yan Li, Lisa Elme´ n, Igor Segota, Tao Long, Scott N. Peterson, Ze’ev A. Ronai

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2020.01.035

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211124720300504#app2

Glutamine could help people with obesity reduce fat mass and inflammation

Glutamine could help people with obesity reduce fat mass and inflammation

Glutamine could help people with obesity reduce fat mass and inflammation

Lower glutamine-levels were also associated with larger fat cell size and higher body fat percentage independently of body-mass index (BMI), according to the study.

#glutamine #leanmass #inflammation

”Glutamine links obesity to inflammation in human white adipose tissue,” Paul Petrus, Simon Lecoutre, Lucile Dollet, Clotilde Wiel, André Sulen, Hui Gao, Beatriz Tavira, Jurga Laurencikiene, Olav Rooyackers, Antonio Checa, Iyadh Douagi, Craig E. Wheelock, Peter Arner, Mark McCarthy, Martin O. Bergo, Laurienne Edgar, Robin P. Choudhury, Myriam Aouadi, Anna Krookand Mikael Rydén, Cell Metabolism, online December 19, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.019

Modest Weight loss can lead to Diabetes Remission

Modest Weight loss can lead to Diabetes Remission

Modest Weight loss can lead to Diabetes Remission

The researchers found that 257 participants (30%) participants were in remission at five-year follow-up. People who achieved weight loss of 10% or more within the first five years after diagnosis were more than twice as likely to go into remission compared to people who maintained the same weight.

“We’ve known for some time now that it’s possible to send diabetes into remission using fairly drastic measures such as intensive weight loss programmes and extreme calorie restriction,” says Dr Hajira Dambha-Miller from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care.

H. Dambha‐Miller, A. J. Day, J. Strelitz, G. Irving, S. J. Griffin. Behaviour change, weight loss and remission of Type 2 diabetes: a community‐based prospective cohort study. Diabetic Medicine, 2019; DOI: 10.1111/dme.14122

#diabetes #remission #diet

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dme.14122

Flavonoid Intake for Maximum Longevity

Flavonoid Intake for Maximum Longevity

Flavonoid Intake for Maximum Longevity

Participants consuming about 500mg of total flavonoids each day had the lowest risk of a cancer or heart disease-related death.

‘Flavonoid intake is associated with lower mortality in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Cohort,’ Nature Communications (2019). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-11622-x

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-11622-x

Mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline by 50%

Mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline by 50%

A team from the Department of Psychological Medicine and Department of Biochemistry at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that seniors who consume more than two standard portions of mushrooms weekly may have 50 per cent reduced odds of having mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

“We’re very interested in a compound called ergothioneine (ET),” said Dr Irwin Cheah, Senior Research Fellow at the NUS Department of Biochemistry. “ET is a unique antioxidant and anti-inflammatory which humans are unable to synthesize on their own. But it can be obtained from dietary sources, one of the main ones being mushrooms.”

Lei Feng, Irwin Kee-Mun Cheah, Maisie Mei-Xi Ng, Jialiang Li, Sue Mei Chan, Su Lin Lim, Rathi Mahendran, Ee-Heok Kua, Barry Halliwell. The Association between Mushroom Consumption and Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Community-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Singapore. Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, 2019; 1 DOI: 10.3233/JAD-180959

https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad180959

Bedtime protein for bigger gains? Here’s the scoop

Bedtime protein for bigger gains? Here’s the scoop

Downing a casein shake just before sleep increases muscle mass and strength gains from resistance training, without ‘making you fat’ — but is the effect any different to your regular post-workout protein supplement.

Tim Snijders, Jorn Trommelen, Imre W. K. Kouw, Andrew M. Holwerda, Lex B. Verdijk, Luc J. C. van Loon. The Impact of Pre-sleep Protein Ingestion on the Skeletal Muscle Adaptive Response to Exercise in Humans: An Update. Frontiers in Nutrition, 2019; 6 DOI: 10.3389/fnut.2019.00017

#nighttimeprotein #casein #muscle

Flaxseed Fiber Surprising benefits for Metabolism and Overall health

Flaxseed Fiber Surprising benefits for Metabolism and Overall health

 

“Our data suggest that flaxseed fiber supplementation affects host metabolism by increasing energy expenditure and reducing obesity as well as by improving glucose tolerance. Future research should be directed to understand relative contribution of the different microbes and delineate underlying mechanisms for how flaxseed fibers affect host metabolism,” the researchers wrote.
#flaxseed #metabolism #fermentable

Tulika Arora, Olga Rudenko, Kristoffer Lihme Egerod, Anna Sofie Husted, Petia Kovatcheva-Datchary, Rozita Akrami, Mette Kristensen, Thue W. Schwartz, Fredrik Bäckhed. Microbial fermentation of flaxseed fibers modulates the transcriptome of GPR41-expressing enteroendocrine cells and protects mice against diet-induced obesity. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 2018; DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00391.2018

https://www.physiology.org/doi/abs/10.1152/ajpendo.00391.2018

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

The objective of this study is to determine which foods are the most nutrient dense sources of nutrients demonstrated by human studies published in the current scientific literature to play a role in the prevention and promotion of recovery from depressive disorders.

LaChance LR, Ramsey D. Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression. World J Psychiatry 2018; 8(3): 97-104

Nitrate Rich foods may prevent Fatty Liver Disease

Nitrate Rich foods may prevent Fatty Liver Disease

“When we supplemented with dietary nitrate to mice fed with a high-fat and sugar Western diet, we noticed a significantly lower proportion of fat in the liver,” says Mattias Carlström, Associate Professor at the Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet. Their results were confirmed by using two different cell culture studies in human liver cells. Apart from a lower risk of steatosis, the researchers also observed reduction of blood pressure and improved insulin/glucose homeostasis in mice with type 2 diabetes. Isabel Cordero-Herrera, Mikael Kozyra, Zhengbing Zhuge, Sarah McCann Haworth, Chiara Moretti, Maria Peleli, Mayara Caldeira-Dias, Arghavan Jahandideh, Han Huirong, Josiane de Campos Cruz, Andrei L. Kleschyov, Marcelo F. Montenegro, Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg, Eddie Weitzberg, Jon O. Lundberg, and Mattias Carlstrom PNAS published ahead of print December 17, 2018 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1809406115

Cottonseed oil linked with rapid drops in triglycerides and cholesterol

Cottonseed oil linked with rapid drops in triglycerides and cholesterol

Cottonseed oil linked with rapid drops in triglycerides and cholesterol

Participants showed an average decrease of 8 percent in total cholesterol on the cottonseed oil diet, along with a 15 percent decrease in low-density lipoprotein, or LDL (the “bad” cholesterol) and a 30 percent decrease in triglycerides. (5 days)

Kristine R.Polley, Natalie J.Oswell, Ronald B.Pegg, Chad M.Paton, Jamie A.Cooper, A 5-day high-fat diet rich in cottonseed oil improves cholesterol profiles and triglycerides compared to olive oil in healthy men, Nutrition Research (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.nutres.2018.09.001

Following five healthy lifestyle habits may increase life expectancy by decade or more

Following five healthy lifestyle habits may increase life expectancy by decade or more

Researchers also found that U.S. women and men who maintained the healthiest lifestyles were 82% less likely to die from cardiovascular disease and 65% less likely to die from cancer when compared with those with the least healthy lifestyles over the course of the roughly 30-year study period.

Impact of Healthy Lifestyle Factors on Life Expectancies in the US Population
Yanping Li, An Pan, Dong D. Wang, Xiaoran Liu, Klodian Dhana, Oscar H. Franco, Stephen Kaptoge, Emanuele Di Angelantonio, Meir Stampfer, Walter C. Willett and Frank B. Hu
Circulation. 2018;CIRCULATIONAHA.117.032047, originally published April 30, 2018

 

MSG Correlated with Chronic Pain

MSG Correlated with Chronic Pain

In a new pilot study in chronic pain sufferers, hydration in combination with replacing MSG as a spice resulted in an equal to or greater than a 30% reduction of pain in two weeks outperforming   acetaminophen.
Dietary correlates of chronic widespread pain in Meru, Kenya. Nutrition, 2018; DOI: 10.1016/j.nut.2018.01.016

Scientists halt breast cancer spread

Scientists halt breast cancer spread

 

Scientists have discovered that an amino acid called asparagine is essential for breast cancer spread, and by restricting it, cancer cells stopped invading other parts of the body in mice, according to new research.

Citation: Asparagine bioavailability governs metastasis in a model of breast cancer. Nature, 2018; DOI: 10.1038/nature25465

Asparagine, breast cancer, head cancer, neck cancer, spread, metastasis, halt, diet

Healthy diet could slow or reverse early effects of Alzheimer’s disease

2010 study posted for filing

Contact: Preston M. Moretz pmoretz@temple.edu 215-204-4380 Temple University

Patients in the early to moderate stages of Alzheimer’s Disease could have their cognitive impairment slowed or even reversed by switching to a healthier diet, according to researchers at Temple University.

In a previous study [http://www.temple.edu/newsroom/2009_2010/12/stories/alzheimers.htm], researchers led by Domenico Praticò, an associate professor of pharmacology in Temple’s School of Medicine, demonstrated that a diet rich in methionine could increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease. Methionine is an amino acid typically found in red meats, fish, beans, eggs, garlic, lentils, onions, yogurt and seeds.

“The question we asked now as a follow-up is if, for whatever reason, you had made bad choices in your diet, is there a chance you can slow down or even reverse the disease or is it too late — that there is nothing you could do,” said Praticò.

As in the previous study, the researchers fed one group of mice a diet high in methionine and another group a regular, healthy diet. After five months, they split the group receiving the methionine-rich diet into two, with one group continuing the amino-heavy diet while the second switched to the healthy diet for an additional two months.

“At the end of the study, when we looked at these mice, what we found — very surprisingly — was that switching to a more healthy diet reversed the cognitive impairment that had built up over the first three months of eating the methionine-rich diet,” said Praticò. “This improvement was associated with less amyloid plaques — another sign of the disease — in their brains.

Pratico said that the cognitive impairment that had been observed in the mice after three months on the methionine-rich diet was completely reversed after two months on the healthier diet, and they were now able to function normally.

“We believe this finding shows that, even if you suffer from the early effects of MCI or Alzheimer’s, switching to a healthier diet that is lower in methionine could be helpful in that memory capacity could be improved,” he said.

Pratico stressed that this was not a drug therapy for curing MCI or Alzheimer’s, but that it did demonstrate that a lifestyle change such as diet can improve some of the impairments that have already occurred in the brain.

“What it tells us is that the brain has this plasticity to reverse a lot of the bad things that have occurred; the ability to recoup a lot of things such as memory that were apparently lost, but obviously not totally lost,” he said.

Pratico also emphasized that the researchers believe that in addition to switching to a healthy diet, patients diagnosed with MCI or Alzheimer’s also need a regiment of physical as well as mental exercises.

“This combination won’t cure you, but we believe, as we saw in this study, that it will be able to slow down or even possibly reverse the effects on the cognitive impairment,” he said.

###

The study, “Normalization of hyperhomocysteinemia improves cognitive deficits and ameliorates brain amyloidosis of a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease,” is being published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (http://www.fasebj.org/). It was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Copies of this study are available to working journalists and may be obtained by contacting Preston M. Moretz in Temple’s Office of University Communications at pmoretz@temple.edu.

Processed food diet in early childhood may lower subsequent IQ

Contact: Emma Dickinson edickinson@bmjgroup.com 44-207-383-6529 BMJ-British Medical Journal

Are dietary patterns in childhood associated with IQ at 8 years of age? A population-based cohort study

A diet, high in fats, sugars, and processed foods in early childhood may lower IQ, while a diet packed full of vitamins and nutrients may do the opposite, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

The authors base their findings on participants in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), which is tracking the long term health and wellbeing of around 14,000 children born in 1991 and 1992.

Parents completed questionnaires, detailing the types and frequency of the food and drink their children consumed when they were 3, 4, 7 and 8.5 years old.

Three dietary patterns were identified: “processed” high in fats and sugar intake; “traditional” high in meat and vegetable intake; and “health conscious” high in salad, fruit and vegetables, rice and pasta. Scores were calculated for each pattern for each child.

IQ was measured using a validated test (the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children) when they were 8.5 years old. In all, complete data were available for just under 4,000 children.

The results showed that after taking account of potentially influential factors, a predominantly processed food diet at the age of 3 was associated with a lower IQ at the age of 8.5, irrespective of whether the diet improved after that age. Every 1 point increase in dietary pattern score was associated with a 1.67 fall in IQ.

On the other hand, a healthy diet was associated with a higher IQ at the age of 8.5, with every 1 point increase in dietary pattern linked to a 1.2 increase in IQ. Dietary patterns between the ages of 4 and 7 had no impact on IQ.

The authors say that these findings, although modest, are in line with previous ALSPAC research showing an association between early childhood diet and later behaviour and school performance.

“This suggests that any cognitive/behavioural effects relating to eating habits in early childhood may well persist into later childhood, despite any subsequent changes (including improvements) to dietary intake,” they say.

The brain grows at its fastest rate during the first three years of life, say the authors, by way of a possible explanation for the findings, adding that other research has indicated that head growth at this time is linked to intellectual ability.

“It is possible that good nutrition during this period may encourage optimal brain growth,” they suggest, advocating further research to determine the extent of the effect early diet has on intelligence.

* Repsoted at Request