Omega–3 For Better Heart Rate Recovery

Omega–3 For Better Heart Rate Recovery

Previous studies have shown that a slow heart rate recovery is associated with increased risk for sudden cardiac death, which fits with higher EPA and DHA levels being linked with reduced risk for sudden cardiac death

#heartraterecovery #heartrhythm #omega3

Higher omega-3 index is associated with more rapid heart rate recovery in healthy men and women

https://www.plefa.com/article/S0952-3278(20)30164-2/fulltext

heart rate, heart rhythm, pulse, heart rate recovery, heart health, omega 3, EPA, DHA, omega 3 index, docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, exercise recovery, running, jogging, treadmill, longevity, cardiac death, cardiac health, pufa, resting heart rate

COVID-19 Updated Nutritional Supplement Research

COVID-19 Updated Nutritional Supplement Research

Dietary supplements an important weapon for fighting off COVID-19

Optimal Nutritional Status for a Well-Functioning Immune System Is an Important Factor to Protect against Viral Infections Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 1181; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12041181

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/4/1181/htm

Ayurveda and yoga for COVID-19 prevention

Public Health Approach of Ayurveda and Yoga for COVID-19 Prophylaxis Published Online:20 Apr 2020https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2020.0129

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/acm.2020.0129

#Ashwagandha, #Dietarysupplements, #sars-cov-2

Presenting Characteristics, Comorbidities, and Outcomes Among 5700 Patients Hospitalized With COVID-19 in the New York City Area JAMA. Published online April 22, 2020. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.6775

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2765184?guestAccessKey=906e474e-0b94-4e0e-8eaa-606ddf0224f5

Eurekalet

https://www.eurekalert.org/

Science Daily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/

Annals of Internal Medicine

https://annals.org/

Ayurveda, sars-cov-2, yoga, dietary supplements, immune system, , dosage, zinc, omega-3, dha, epa, nutritional status, mechanical ventilator, mortality, vitamin e, SARS coronavirus 2, Prophylaxis, immune system; viral infection; influenza; COVID-19; micronutrients, vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids, minerals, vitamin C, vitamin D, influenza, flu, virus,

Omega-3 fish oil as effective for attention as ADHD drugs for some children

Omega-3 fish oil as effective for attention as ADHD drugs for some children

‘Our results suggest that fish oil supplements are at least as effective for attention as conventional pharmacological treatments among those children with ADHD who have omega-3 deficiency.

#adhd #omega3 #epa

Chang, J.P., Su, K., Mondelli, V. et al. High-dose eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) improves attention and vigilance in children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and low endogenous EPA levels. Transl Psychiatry 9, 303 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41398-019-0633-0

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41398-019-0633-0#citeas

Optimal Omega-3 intake to reduce CVD risk

Optimal Omega-3 intake to reduce CVD risk

Optimal Omega-3 intake to reduce CVD risk

A dose–response analysis based on 58 placebo‐controlled trials estimated that each 1 g/d increase of marine omega‐3 reduced triglyceride levels by 5.9 mg/dL and such linear association did not plateau even at 7 g/d

Yang Hu, Frank B. Hu, JoAnn E. Manson. Marine Omega‐3 Supplementation and Cardiovascular Disease: An Updated Meta‐Analysis of 13 Randomized Controlled Trials Involving 127 477 Participants. Journal of the American Heart Association, 2019; 8 (19) DOI: 10.1161/JAHA.119.013543

#omega3 #cvd #risk

https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.119.013543

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

The objective of this study is to determine which foods are the most nutrient dense sources of nutrients demonstrated by human studies published in the current scientific literature to play a role in the prevention and promotion of recovery from depressive disorders.

LaChance LR, Ramsey D. Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression. World J Psychiatry 2018; 8(3): 97-104

Omega-3 levels better predictors of death risk than cholesterol

Omega-3 levels better predictors of death risk than cholesterol

Results showed that the risk for death from any cause was reduced by about 33% comparing in participants with highest omega-3 blood levels while total serum cholesterol was not significantly associated with any of the tracked outcomes

Erythrocyte long-chain omega-3 fatty acid levels are inversely associated with mortalityand with incident cardiovascular disease: The Framingham Heart Study DOI:10.1016/j.jacl.2018.02.010

How Good Fats Build Bone

How Good Fats Build Bone

How Good Fats Build Bone
Researchers discover how DHA helps stem cells become bone forming cells

ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids direct differentiation of the membrane phenotype in mesenchymal stem cells to potentiate osteogenesis/ Science Advances  08 Nov 2017: Vol. 3, no. 11, eaao1193 DOI:10.1126/sciadv.aao1193

Omega-3 kills cancer cells: Docosahexanoic acid (DHA)

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: Graeme Baldwin graeme.baldwin@biomedcentral.com 44-020-319-22165 BioMed Central

Docosahexanoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oils, has been shown to reduce the size of tumours and enhance the positive effects of the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, while limiting its harmful side effects. The rat experiments, described in BioMed Central’s open access journal Cell Division, provide some support for the plethora of health benefits often ascribed to omega-3 acids.

Professor A. M. El-Mowafy led a team of researchers from Mansoura University, Egypt, who studied DHA’s effects on solid tumours growing in mice, as well as investigating how this fatty acid interacts with cisplatin, a chemotherapy drug that is known to cause kidney damage. El-Mowafy said, “DHA elicited prominent chemopreventive effects on its own, and appreciably augmented those of cisplatin as well. Furthermore, this study is the first to reveal that DHA can obliterate lethal cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and renal tissue injury.”

DHA is an omega-3 fatty acid that is commonly found in cold-water fish oil, and some vegetable oils. It is a major component of brain gray matter and of the retina in most mammalian species and is considered essential for normal neurological and cellular developments. According to the authors, “While DHA has been tentatively linked with protection against cardiovascular, neurological and neoplastic diseases, there exists a paucity of research information, in particular regarding its interactions with existing chemotherapy drugs”. The researchers found that, at the molecular level, DHA acts by reducing leukocytosis (white blood cell accumulation), systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress – all processes that have been linked with tumour growth.

El-Mowafy and his colleagues have called for greater deployment of omega-3 in the fight against cancer. They write, “Our results suggest a new, fruitful drug regimen in the management of solid tumors based on combining cisplatin, and possibly other chemotherapeutics, with DHA”.

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Notes to Editors

1. Chemopreventive and renal protective effects for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA): implications of CRP and lipid peroxides M E Elmesery, M M Algayyar, H A Salem, M M Darweish and A M El-Mowafy Cell Division (in press)

During embargo, article available here: http://www.celldiv.com/imedia/1167880196227293_article.pdf?random=348857

After the embargo, article available at the journal website: http://www.celldiv.com/

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central’s open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication.

2. Cell Division is an Open Access, peer-reviewed online journal that will encompass all aspects of cell cycle control in eukaryotes. Cell Division is an online forum for and from the cell-cycle community that aims to publish articles on all exciting aspects of cell-cycle research and to bridge the gap between models of cell cycle regulation, development, and cancer biology. This forum will be driven by specialized and timely research articles, reviews and commentaries focused on this fast moving field, providing an invaluable tool for cell-cycle biologists.

3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.

Omega-3 intake during last months of pregnancy boosts an infant’s cognitive and motor development

Repost 2008

Contact: Jean-François Huppé jean-francois.huppe@dap.ulaval.ca 418-656-7785 Université Laval

Quebec City, April 9, 2008—A study supervised by Université Laval researchers Gina Muckle and Éric Dewailly reveals that omega-3 intake during the last months of pregnancy boosts an infant’s sensory, cognitive, and motor development. The details of this finding are published in a recent edition of the Journal of Pediatrics.

To come to this conclusion, researchers first measured docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) concentration—a type of omega-3 fatty acid involved in the development of neurons and retinas—in the umbilical cord blood of 109 infants. “DHA concentration in the umbilical cord is a good indicator of intra-uterine exposure to omega-3s during the last trimester of pregnancy, a crucial period for the development of retinal photoreceptors and neurons,” explains Dr. Dewailly.

Tests conducted on these infants at 6 and 11 months revealed that their visual acuity as well as their cognitive and motor development were closely linked to DHA concentration in the umbilical cord blood at the time of their birth. However, there was very little relation between test results and DHA concentration in a mother’s milk among infants who were breast-fed. “These results highlight the crucial importance of prenatal exposure to omega-3s in a child’s development,” points out Dr. Muckle.

Researchers observed that DHA concentration in the umbilical cord blood was in direct relation with the concentration found in a mother’s blood, a reminder of the importance of a mother’s diet in providing omega-3 fatty acids for the fetus. They also noted that DHA concentration was higher in the fetus’s blood than in the mother’s. “While developing its nervous system, a fetus needs great quantities of DHA. It can even transform other types of omega-3s into DHA in order to develop its brain,” explains Dr. Dewailly.

For the members of the research team, there is no doubt that all pregnant women should be encouraged to get sufficient amounts of omega-3s. “A diet rich in omega-3s during pregnancy can’t be expected to solve everything, but our results show that such a diet has positive effects on a child’s sensory, cognitive, and motor development. Benefits from eating fish with low contaminant levels and high omega-3 contents, such as trout, salmon, and sardines, far outweigh potential risks even during pregnancy,” conclude the researchers.

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In addition to Muckle and Dewailly, who are also affiliated to the Centre de recherche du CHUQ, Quebec City, the study was co-authored by Pierre Ayotte from Université Laval, as well as Joseph Jacobson, Sandra Jacobson, and Melissa Kaplan-Estrin from Wayne State University. This study was funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Hydro-Québec, and Health Canada.

Information: Gina Muckle School of Psychology Université Laval Phone: (418) 656-4141 ext. 46199 gina.muckle@psy.ulaval.ca

Éric Dewailly Faculty of Medicine Université Laval Phone: (418) 656-4141 ext. 46518 eric.dewailly@crchul.ulaval.ca

DHA Omega-3 fatty acids protect against Parkinson’s, study says

 

 

Quebec City, November 26, 2007—Omega-3 fatty acids protect the brain against Parkinson’s disease, according to a study by Université Laval researchers published in the online edition of the FASEB Journal, the journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. This study, supervised by Frederic Calon and Francesca Cicchetti, is the first to demonstrate the protective effect of a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids against Parkinson’s.

 

The researchers observed that when mice were fed an omega-3 rich diet, they seemed immune to the effect of MPTP, a toxic compound that causes the same damage to the brain as Parkinson’s. “This compound, which has been used for more than 20 years in Parkinson’s research, works faster than the disease itself and is just as effective in targeting and destroying the dopamine-producing neurons in the brain,” points out Calon

 

By contrast, another group of mice that were fed an ordinary diet developed the characteristic symptoms of the disease when injected with MPTP, including a 31% drop in dopamine-producing neurons and a 50% decrease in dopamine levels.

 

Analyses revealed that omega-3 fatty acids—in particular DHA (docosahexaenoic acid), a specific type of omega-3—had replaced the omega-6 fatty acids already present in the brains of the mice that had been given omega-3 supplementation.

 

“This demonstrates both the importance of diet on the brain’s fatty acid composition and the brain’s natural inclination for omega-3 fatty acids,” observes Calon. Since concentrations of other types of omega-3’s had remained similar in both groups of mice, researchers suggest that the protective effect against Parkinson’s comes essentially from DHA.

 

Another conclusion to be drawn from this finding is that a brain containing a lot of omega-6 fatty acids may be a fertile ground for Parkinson’s disease. These fatty acids, abundant in foods rich in either vegetable oil or animal fat, are already under suspicion for their role in the body’s inflammatory response, cardiac disease, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s. In a balanced diet, the ratio between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids should be 4 to 1. However, the average Western diet contains 10 to 20 times more omega-6’s than omega-3’s.

 

“In North America, the average intake of DHA is between 60 to 80 mg a day, while experts recommend a daily minimum of 250 mg,” explains Calon. “Our results suggest that this DHA deficiency is a risk factor for developing Parkinson’s disease, and that we would benefit from evaluating omega-3’s potential for preventing and treating this disease in humans,” concludes the researcher.

* Reposted for Filing