Thousands protest against tough new official secrets law ( Japan )

By Kiyoshi Takenaka

Politics Nov. 22, 2013 – 06:42AM JST ( 23 )

TOKYO —

Thousands of people protested in Tokyo on Thursday against a proposed secrets act that critics say would stifle information on issues such as the Fukushima nuclear crisis.

The law, proposed by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government, would significantly broaden the definition of official secrets, which Abe says is vital for strengthening security cooperation with main ally the United States and other countries.

Tough secrecy regulations before and during World War Two have long made such legislation taboo, but the law is expected to pass when it comes to a vote next week, given the comfortable majority the ruling coalition has in both houses of parliament.

“Without the right to know, democracy cannot exist,” said Yasunari Fujimoto, from the Peace Forum citizen’s group, who spoke at the protest in Hibiya Park near the Diet. “If this law comes to pass, our constitution is nothing more than a scrap of paper.”

Critics say the law would prevent journalists from investigating official mistakes, such as the collusion between regulators and utilities that contributed to the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster.

Anyone convicted of breaking the law could be jailed for up to five years.

Read More : http://www.japantoday.com/category/politics/view/thousands-protest-against-tough-new-official-secrets-law

Author: Ralph Turchiano

In short, I review clinical research on an almost daily basis. What I post tends to be articles that are relevant to the readers in addition to some curiosities that have intriguing potential. As a hobby, I truly enjoy the puzzle-solving play that statistics and programming as in the python language bring to the table. I just do not enjoy problem-solving, I love problem-solving and the childlike inspiration and exploration of that innocent exhilaration of discovering something new. Enjoy ;-)

One thought on “Thousands protest against tough new official secrets law ( Japan )”

Comments are closed.