Probiotic LGG and Butyrate Rapidly Increase Bone Density

Probiotic LGG and Butyrate Rapidly Increase Bone Density

Probiotics increase bone volume in healthy mice

“We were surprised by the potency of the gut microbiome in regulating bone and by the complexity of the mechanism of action of probiotics,” Pacifici says. “In general, there is a lot of interest in the concept that the gut bacteria regulate the function of distant organs. How this happens is largely unknown. We described a detailed mechanism by which changes in the composition of the gut microbiome induced by probiotics affect a distant system like the skeleton.”

Immunity, Tyagi and Yu et al.: “The Microbial Metabolite Butyrate Stimulates Bone Formation via T Regulatory Cell-Mediated Regulation of WNT10B Expression” https://www.cell.com/immunity/fulltext/S1074-7613(18)30478-3 , DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2018.10.013

Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, butyrate, microbiota, bone formation, probiotics, short-chain fatty acids, Wnt10b, NFAT, T cells, regulatory T cell, bone volume, bone density, skeletal, spine

Probiotics in Children reduced antibiotic prescriptions up to 53%

Probiotics in Children reduced antibiotic prescriptions up to 53%

Probiotics in Children reduced antibiotic prescriptions up to 53%

Researchers found that when the results from twelve studies were pooled together, infants and children were 29% percent less likely to have been prescribed antibiotics if they received probiotics as a daily health supplement. When the analysis was repeated with only the highest quality studies, this percentage increased to 53%.

Sarah King, Daniel Tancredi, Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop, Kelsie Gould, Hailey Vann, Grant Connors, Mary Ellen Sanders, Jeffrey A Linder, Andi L Shane, Dan Merenstein; Does probiotic consumption reduce antibiotic utilization for common acute infections? A systematic review and meta-analysis, European Journal of Public Health, , cky185, https://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/cky185

Children, infants, probiotics, antibiotics, Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, illness, treatment, study

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older women

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older women

Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo. The research opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among the elderly.

Anna G. Nilsson, Daniel Sundh, Fredrik Bäckhed, Mattias Lorentzon. Lactobacillus reuteri reduces bone loss in older women with low bone mineral density – a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial. Journal of Internal Medicine, 2018; DOI: 10.1111/joim.12805

Lifespan greatly enhanced with Synbiotics

Lifespan greatly enhanced with Synbiotics

Lifespan greatly enhanced with Synbiotics

Scientists fed fruit flies with a combination of probiotics and an herbal supplement called Triphala that was able to prolong the flies’ longevity by 60 % and protect them against chronic diseases associated with aging.

Susan Westfall, Nikita Lomis, Satya Prakash. Longevity extension in Drosophila through gut-brain communication. Scientific Reports, 2018; 8 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-25382-z

Wine Polyphenols could fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease

Wine Polyphenols could fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease

Polyphenols could fend off bacteria that cause cavities and gum disease

The researchers checked out the effect of two red wine polyphenols, as well as commercially available grape seed and red wine extracts, on bacteria that stick to teeth and gums and cause dental plaque, cavities and periodontal disease.

Inhibition of Oral Pathogens Adhesion to Human Gingival Fibroblasts by Wine Polyphenols Alone and in Combination with an Oral Probiotic. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2018; DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b05466

*Grape Seed Extract may help repair Micro-cavities

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QRHOyntGLzg

Probiotics help gastric-bypass patients lose weight more quickly, Stanford study shows

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: Diane Rogers
donut@stanford.edu
650-723-3900
Stanford University Medical Center

STANFORD, Calif. — New research from the Stanford University School of Medicine and Stanford Hospital & Clinics suggests that the use of a dietary supplement after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery can help obese patients to more quickly lose weight and to avoid deficiency of a critical B vitamin.

In a study published in the July issue of the Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, John Morton, MD, associate professor of surgery at the medical school, showed that patients who take probiotics after the gastric-bypass procedure tend to shed more pounds than those who don’t take the supplements. Probiotics are the so-called “good” bacteria found in yogurt as well as in over-the-counter dietary supplements that help in the digestion of food.

“Surprisingly, the probiotic group attained a significantly greater percent of excess weight loss than that of control group,” said Morton, who wrote the paper with lead author Gavitt Woodard, a third-year medical student, and five other medical students at the Surgery Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation in Stanford’s Department of Surgery. Morton has performed more than 1,000 of these bypasses at Stanford Hospital & Clinics.

The researchers followed 44 patients on whom Morton had performed the procedure from 2006 to 2007. Patients were randomized into either a probiotic or a control group. Both groups received the same bariatric medical care and nutritional counseling, as well as the support of weight-loss study groups. Both groups also were allowed to consume yogurt, a natural source of probiotics. In addition, the probiotic group consumed one pill per day of Puritan’s Pride, a probiotic supplement that is available online and in many stores. Morton has no financial ties to the company that makes the supplement.

The study showed that at three months, the probiotics group registered a 47.6 percent weight loss, compared with a 38.5 percent for the control group.

The study also found that levels of vitamin B-12 were higher in the patients taking probiotics — a significant finding because patients often are deficient in B-12 after gastric-bypass surgery. The probiotics group had B-12 levels of 1,214 picograms per milliliter at three months, compared with the control group’s levels of 811 pg/mL.

Morton said he now recommends probiotic supplements to his patients, and he plans to continue to look for ways to enhance the outcomes from the procedure.

Roughly 15 million Americans are morbidly obese, and bypass surgery is becoming an increasingly common treatment for the problem. Some 150,000 Americans who have a body mass index of more than 40 — who are typically at least 100 pounds overweight — have the procedure each year.

Morton said the study was prompted by the fact that some patients have problems eating after gastric-bypass surgery. “For some reason, the food doesn’t go down right,” he said. When no anatomical reasons could be found for blockages, he hypothesized that a build-up of bacteria in the intestine — bacterial overgrowth — might be the culprit.

“Bacterial overgrowth can be bad in that it changes your motility, how you empty,” Morton said. “A lot of people aren’t aware that we all carry about a lot of bacteria in our intestines and that they’re extremely helpful in aiding digestion. And I thought, ‘Well, if we give these patients probiotics, then maybe we can improve these symptoms.’

“Part of the obesity puzzle may be due to the kind of bacteria you have in your intestine,” he said.

 

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There was no outside funding for the study.

The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation’s top 10 medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://mednews.stanford.edu. The medical school is part of Stanford Medicine, which includes Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. For information about all three, please visit http://stanfordmedicine.org/about/news.html.

Stanford Hospital & Clinics is known worldwide for advanced treatment of complex disorders in areas such as cardiac care, cancer treatment, neurosciences, surgery, and organ transplants. Consistently ranked among the top institutions in the U.S. News and World Report annual list of “America’s Best Hospitals,” Stanford Hospital & Clinics is internationally recognized for translating medical breakthroughs into the care of patients. For more information, visit www.stanfordhospital.com.

PRINT MEDIA CONTACT: Diane Rogers at (650) 723-3900 (donut@stanford.edu)
BROADCAST MEDIA CONTACT: Liat Kobza at (650) 723-1462 (lkobza@stanfordmed.org)
(NOTE TO REPORTERS: A high-resolution image of John Morton is available for download at http://med.stanford.edu/news_releases/2009/download/morton.jpg)