100% Cure Rate Pancreatic Cancer Experimental Study Animal Model

100% Cure Rate Pancreatic Cancer Experimental Study Animal Model

100% Cure Rate Pancreatic Cancer Experimental Study Animal Model

A research team reports that combining a type of radiation therapy with immunotherapy not only cures pancreatic cancer in mice, but appears to reprogram the immune system to create an ‘immune memory’ in the same way that a vaccine keeps the flu away. The result is that the combination treatment also destroyed pancreatic cells that had spread to the liver, a common site for metastatic disease.

#il-12 #sbrt #pancraticcancercure

Bradley N. Mills, Kelli A. Connolly, Jian Ye, Joseph D. Murphy, Taylor P. Uccello, Booyeon J. Han, Tony Zhao, Michael G. Drage, Aditi Murthy, Haoming Qiu, Ankit Patel, Nathania M. Figueroa, Carl J. Johnston, Peter A. Prieto, Nejat K. Egilmez, Brian A. Belt, Edith M. Lord, David C. Linehan, Scott A. Gerber. Stereotactic Body Radiation and Interleukin-12 Combination Therapy Eradicates Pancreatic Tumors by Repolarizing the Immune Microenvironment. Cell Reports, 2019; 29 (2): 406 DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2019.08.095

https://www.cell.com/cell-reports/fulltext/S2211-1247(19)31157-X?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS221112471931157X%3Fshowall%3Dtrue

Pancreatic cancer, il-12, sbrt, stereotactic body radiotherapy, pancreas, cancer, aggressive, advanced, study, CD8, treatment, immune system, vaccine, cancer vaccine, liver cancer, metastatic

Ginkgo Biloba may have potential in treating Type 2 Diabetes

Ginkgo Biloba may have potential in treating Type 2 Diabetes

Ginkgo Biloba may have potential in treating Type 2 Diabetes

The pancreatic beta cells of diabetic rats are reduced and insulin secretion is curtailed. After having Ginkgo biloba and magnetized water added to their diets, the mass of the pancreatic beta cells and the amount of insulin in these cells was shown to increase markedly, almost back to normal levels, particularly in the Ginkgo biloba-treated group, says Hetta.

Impact of Ginkgo biloba extract and magnetized water on the survival rate and functional capabilities of pancreatic β-cells in type 2 diabetic rat model. Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: Targets and Therapy, 2019; Volume 12: 1339 DOI: 10.2147/DMSO.S209856

https://www.dovepress.com/impact-of-ginkgo-biloba-extract-and-magnetized-water-on-the-survival-r-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO

#ginkgobiloba #magnetizedwater #diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed with New Beta Cell Implant (Animal Model)

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed with New Beta Cell Implant (Animal Model)

Researchers have successfully created a novel biomaterial that can be seeded with insulin-producing beta cells. Implantation of the beta cell-seeded biomaterial reversed diabetes in a mouse model by effectively normalizing glucose levels and significantly increasing survival.

Researchers show some cells in pancreas can spontaneously change into insulin-producing cells

2010 study posted for filing

Contact: Joana Casas mcasas@jdrf.org 212-479-7560 Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International

NEW YORK, April 5, 2010 – Alpha cells in the pancreas, which do not produce insulin, can convert into insulin-producing beta cells, advancing the prospect of regenerating beta cells as a cure for type 1 diabetes. The findings come from a study at the University of Geneva, co-funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, that is published today in the online edition of the scientific journal Nature.

The researchers, led by Dr. Pedro L. Herrera, demonstrated that beta cells will spontaneously regenerate after near-total beta cell destruction in mice and the majority of the regenerated beta cells are derived from alpha cells that had been reprogrammed, or converted, into beta cells. Using a unique model of diabetes in mice, in which nearly all of the beta cells are rapidly destroyed, the researchers found that if the mice were maintained on insulin therapy, beta cells were slowly and spontaneously restored, eventually eliminating the need for insulin replacement. Alpha cells normally reside alongside beta cells in the pancreas and secrete a hormone called glucagon, which works opposite to insulin to regulate the levels of sugar in the blood. Alpha cells are not attacked by the autoimmune processes that destroy beta cells and causes type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes is a chronic, autoimmune disease that affects children, adolescents and adults, in which the immune system attacks the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that enables people to convert food into energy. People with type 1 diabetes are dependent on insulin treatment for the rest of their life.

Dr. Herrera’s results are the first to show that beta cell reprogramming can occur spontaneously, without genetic alterations. Previous efforts to reprogram non-beta cells into beta cells relied on genetic manipulations – processes that can not be easily translated into therapies.

According to Dr. Andrew Rakeman, JDRF Program Manager in Beta Cell Therapies, the breakthrough in Dr. Herrera’s work is the demonstration that alpha- to-beta-cell reprogramming can be a natural, spontaneous process., “If we can understand the signals that are triggering this conversion, it will open a whole new potential strategy for regenerating beta cells in people with type 1 diabetes,” he said. “It appears that the body can restore beta cell function either through reprogramming alpha cells to become beta cells or, as previously shown by others, by increasing growth of existing beta cells. This path may be particularly useful in individuals who have had the disease for a long time and have no, or very few, remaining beta cells.”

Role of Removing Beta Cells

Dr. Herrera’s team genetically engineered the animals to be susceptible to a toxin that would destroy only their beta cells. When the mice were exposed to the toxin, the beta cells were rapidly and efficiently destroyed – greater than 99% just 15 days after treatment. Then, to track the source of newly regenerated beta cells, Dr. Herrera’s team used another genetic manipulation to permanently label mature alpha cells and all their descendents with a fluorescent protein. This “genetic lineage tracing” approach allowed the scientists to track the fate of the alpha cells and their progeny; the presence of fluorescently labeled beta cells in the recovered animals gave conclusive evidence that alpha cells had reprogrammed into beta cells.

The Geneva researchers pointed out that the critical factor in sparking the alpha-to- beta-cell reprogramming was removing (or ablating) nearly all the original insulin-producing cells in the mice. In mice where the loss of beta cells was more modest, the researchers either found no evidence of beta cell regeneration (when only half the cells were destroyed) or less alpha cell reprogramming (when less than 95% of cells were destroyed).

“The amount of beta-cell destruction thus appears to determine whether regeneration occurs. Moreover, it influences the degree of cell plasticity and regenerative resources of the pancreas in adult organisms,” said Dr. Herrera.

Regeneration Research

In type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks beta cells, stopping a person’s pancreas from producing insulin, the hormone that enables people to get energy from sugar. JDRF has been at the forefront of diabetes research looking to develop therapeutics to drive the regeneration of insulin-producing cells within a person’s body (as an alternative to transplanting insulin-producing cells from other sources). Beta cell regeneration involves triggering the body to grow its own new insulin producing cells, either by copying existing ones – some are usually still active, even in people who have had diabetes for decades – or causing the pancreas to create new ones.

This study is another step forward for JDRF’s research focus on Regeneration as a potential pathway to restore insulin production – and normal blood sugar in people with type 1 diabetes. JDRF has become a leader in this new and exciting research field, funding a wide range of research projects, including studies like Dr. Herrera’s, and an innovative diabetes drug discovery and development partnership with the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Foundation (GNF), focused on regeneration approaches.

In addition to regenerating or replacing insulin producing cells, a cure for type 1 diabetes will also require stopping the autoimmune attack that causes diabetes, and reestablishing excellent glucose control.

###

 

About JDRF

JDRF is a leader in setting the agenda for diabetes research worldwide, and is the largest charitable funder and advocate of type 1 research. The mission of JDRF is to find a cure for diabetes and its complications through the support of research. Type 1 diabetes is a disease which strikes children and adults suddenly and requires multiple injections of insulin daily or a continuous infusion of insulin through a pump. Insulin, however, is not a cure for diabetes, nor does it prevent its eventual and devastating complications which may include kidney failure, blindness, heart disease, stroke, and amputation.

Since its founding in 1970 by parents of children with type 1 diabetes, JDRF has awarded more than $1.4 billion to diabetes research, including more than $100 million in FY2009.

Diabetes linked to flu

The flu virus has another trick up its sleeve – it may trigger diabetes. The good news is that this discovery may give us a way to prevent some forms of the disease.

In diabetes, cells do not take up sugar from the blood. This can happen because cells have lost sensitivity to the hormone insulin, leading to what is called type 2 diabetes. Linked to diet and lifestyle, this form of the disease is rapidly becoming more common worldwide. Another cause of diabetes happens when the immune system destroys the pancreatic cells that produce insulin. People inherit a genetic predisposition for this condition, called type 1 diabetes, but an environmental trigger is also needed for it to appear.

Since the 1970s, researchers have suspected that viruses may provide this trigger, as type 1 diabetes often sets in suddenly after an infection. Enteroviruses and rotaviruses were both implicated; something about these infections confuses the immune system enough to make it attack the pancreas. But the picture remained unclear.

Then Ilaria Capua, of the World Organisation for Animal Health reference lab for bird flu in Legnaro, Italy, and her team decided to infect turkeys with flu. They did this because they knew birds with flu often have an inflamed pancreas, even when they have strains of the virus that do not normally spread outside the lungs. The team found that many of the turkeys developed severe pancreatic damage and diabetes.

Next, the researchers infected human pancreatic tissue with two common flu viruses. Both “grew really well” in the tissue, including in insulin-producing cells, says Capua.

Inflammatory response

Crucially, the presence of flu in the pancreatic cells triggered production of a set of inflammatory chemicals that have been shown to be central to the autoimmune reactions that lead to type 1 diabetes. One theory is that immune cells present bits of the infected tissue to destructive T-cells, to teach them to recognise the virus. But in the process the T-cells also learn to recognise the cells that make insulin, and to destroy them.

Can flu reach the pancreas? In humans, the virus is normally restricted to the lungs and gut, but can sometimes get into the blood. The virus might also travel up the duct that links the small intestine to the pancreas, Capua suspects. “Either way, when it gets to the pancreas it finds a good place to replicate.”

Capua is now testing the effects of flu on mouse models of type 1 diabetes. She is also looking for signs of recent flu infection in people with newly diagnosed diabetes. She suspects the H1N1 swine flu virus that caused the pandemic of 2009, and is still circulating, could be a particularly good trigger. Doctors in Japan and Italy have reported many newly diagnosed cases of type 1 diabetes in people who had recently had flu, and an upsurge in type 1 diabetes after the 2009 pandemic.

Real impact

“The great thing is that even if flu only causes a few per cent of type 1 diabetes cases, we can vaccinate and prevent flu in people who are genetically predisposed, and that can have a real impact,” says Capua. There are 65,000 new cases of type 1 diabetes worldwide annually, and that figure is growing by 3 to 5 per cent each year.

The link between diabetes and flu adds to growing evidence that many diseases considered non-infectious are actually caused by infection – and can therefore spread.

There is also new evidence that flu can cause heart attacks. Previously, this was suspected, because of the surge in heart attacks that regularly follows the annual flu season. But researchers at the University of Toronto, Canada, have  now demonstrated the effect in individual patients. They reported this week that vaccinating adults for flu, whether they already have cardiac problems or not, makes them half as likely to have a heart attack or stroke in the following year (Canadian Journal of Cardiology, doi.org/jnr).

Journal reference: Journal of Virology, doi.org/jnp

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn22456-diabetes-linked-to-flu.html?full=true&print=true

Garlic chemical tablet treats diabetes 1 and 2

2008 study posted for filing

Contact: Hiromu Sakurai
sakuraih@suzuka-u.ac.jp
Royal Society of Chemistry

Oral administration of vanadium-allixin compound lowers blood glucose levels in diabetic mice

A drug based on a chemical found in garlic can treat diabetes types I and II when taken as a tablet, a study in the new Royal Society of Chemistry journal Metallomics says.

When Hiromu Sakurai and colleagues from the Suzuka University of Medical Science, Japan, gave the drug orally to type I diabetic mice, they found it reduced blood glucose levels.

The drug is based on vanadium and allixin, a compound found in garlic, and its action described in an Advance Article from Metallomics available free online from today. The first issue of the new journal will be published in 2009.

In previous work they had discovered the vanadium-allixin compound treated both diabetes types when injected, but this new study shows the drug has promise as an oral treatment for the disease.

Type I diabetes (insulin dependent) is currently treated with daily injections of insulin, while type II (non-insulin dependent) is treated with drugs bearing undesirable side-effects – the authors note neither treatment is ideal.

The researchers aim to test the drug in humans in future work.

Drinking chamomile tea daily with meals may help prevent the complications of diabetes, which include loss of vision, nerve damage, and kidney damage

2008 Post for filing

Drinking chamomile tea may help fight complications of diabetes Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Drinking chamomile tea daily with meals may help prevent the complications of diabetes, which include loss of vision, nerve damage, and kidney damage, researchers in Japan and the United Kingdom are reporting.

The findings could lead to the development of a new chamomile-based drug for type 2 diabetes, which is at epidemic levels in this country and spreading worldwide, they note. Their study appears in the Sept. 10 issue of the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a bi-weekly publication.

In the new study, Atsushi Kato and colleagues point out that chamomile, also known as manzanilla, has been used for years as a medicinal cure-all to treat a variety of medical problems including stress, colds, and menstrual cramps. Scientists recently proposed that the herbal tea might also be beneficial for fighting diabetes, but the theory hasn’t been scientifically tested until now.

To find out, the researchers fed chamomile extract to a group of diabetic rats for 21 days and compared the results to a group of control animals on a normal diet. The chamomile-supplemented animals showed a significant decrease in blood glucose levels compared with the controls, they say. The extract also showed significant inhibition of both ALR2 enzymes and sorbitol, whose elevated levels are associated with increased diabetic complications, the scientists say. — MTS

ARTICLE #2 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE “Protective Effects of Dietary chamomile Tea on Diabetic Complications”

DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ARTICLE http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf8014365

CONTACT: Atsushi Kato University of Toyama Toyama, Japan Fax: 81 76 434 5155 Email: kato@med.u-toyama.ac.jp

New research suggests diabetes transmitted from parents to children

2008 posted for filing
Contact: Nick Zagorski
nzagorski@asbmb.org
301-634-7366
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

An unusual form of inheritance may have a role in the rising rate of diabetes, especially in children and young adults, in the United States

A new study in the September issue of the Journal of Lipid Research suggests an unusual form of inheritance may have a role in the rising rate of diabetes, especially in children and young adults, in the United States.

DNA is the primary mechanism of inheritance; kids get half their genes from mom and half from dad. However, scientists are just starting to understand additional kinds of inheritance like metabolic programming, which occurs when an insult during a critical period of development, either in the womb or soon after birth, triggers permanent changes in metabolism.

In this study, the researchers looked at the effects of a diet high in saturated fat on mice and their offspring. As expected, they found that a high-fat diet induced type 2 diabetes in the adult mice and that this effect was reversed by stopping the diet.

However, if female mice continued a high-fat diet during pregnancy and/or suckling, their offspring also had a greater frequency of diabetes development, even though the offspring were given a moderate-fat diet. These mice were then mated with healthy mice, and the next generation offspring (grandchildren of the original high-fat fed generation) could develop diabetes as well.

In effect, exposing a fetal mouse to high levels of saturated fats can cause it and its offspring to acquire diabetes, even if the mouse goes off the high-fat diet and its young are never directly exposed.

The study used mice so it’s not time to warn women to eat differently during pregnancy and breastfeeding but earlier research has shown that this kind of inheritance is at work in humans. For example, there is an increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease in children born of malnourished mothers.

###

From the article: “Effects of High Fat Diet Exposure During Fetal Life on Type 2 Diabetes Development in the Progeny” by Donatella Gniuli, Alessandra Calcagno, Maria Emiliana Caristo, Alessandra Mancuso, Veronica Macchi, Geltrude Mingrone, and Roberto Vettor.

Article link: http://www.jlr.org/cgi/content/abstract/M800033-JLR200v1

Corresponding Author: Donatella Gniuli, Istituto di Medicina Interna, Universita’ Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome; Tel: +39-3204261273; email: dgniuli@gmail.com

26th Health Research Report 19 MAR 2008 – Reconstruction

 

 

Editors Top Five:

 
1.      Mayo Clinic proceedings highlights research about cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 fatty acids
2.      Weight loss more effective than intensive insulin therapy for type 2 diabetics
3.      Extra vitamin D in early childhood cuts adult diabetes risk
4.      What effect does melatonin have in colitis?
5.      Only two per cent of paediatric drug trials reported using independent safety monitoring

 

 

In this Issue:

 

1.      Study finds bacteria may reduce risk for kidney stones
2.      Type 2 Diabetes May Be Caused by Intestinal Dysfunction
3.      When the chips are down — soak them!
4.      High levels of estrogen associated with breast cancer recurrence
5.      U of I scientists aim to overcome allergic reactions to soy
6.      UCLA study finds that broccoli may help boost the aging immune system
7.      One small step for man, one giant leap for advertising
8.      Curing addiction with cannabis medicines
9.      New bacteria contaminate hairspray
10.  Oregon study raises questions on synthetic progestins
11.  Magnesium associated with lower risk for some strokes in male smokers
12.  HPV vaccine reduces abnormal pap test results
13.  Mayo Clinic proceedings highlights research about cardiovascular benefits of omega-3 fatty acids
14.  Postoperative chemotherapy does not improve survival in gastric cancer patients
15.  Weight loss more effective than intensive insulin therapy for type 2 diabetics
16.  Study raises caution on new painkillers
17.  Is a cup of tea really the answer to everything — even anthrax?
18.  Killer fungus spells disaster for wheat
19.  Fertility in developing countries: words into action
20.  Extra vitamin D in early childhood cuts adult diabetes risk
21.  Rodent study finds artificial butter chemical harmful to lungs
22.  Study in Circulation Research details how diabetes drives atherosclerosis
23.  Legal exposure to asbestos-like material linked to lung damage 25 years later
24.  An anti-inflammatory response to the vegan diet
25.  Foodborne outbreaks from leafy greens on rise
26.  Solving the drug price crisis
27.  New study: Pycnogenol improves memory in elderly
28.  Pneumococcal disease rates down significantly post-vaccine
29.  What effect does melatonin have in colitis?
30.  Do bacterial combinations result in enhanced cytokine production? No!
31.  Grape skin compound fights the complications of diabetes
32.  Scientists successfully awaken sleeping stem cells
33.  Only two per cent of paediatric drug trials reported using independent safety monitoring
 
http://healthresearchreport.me/2008/03/19/26th-health-research-report-19-mar-2008-reconstruction/

Health Technology Research Synopsis

Health Research Report

26th Issue Date  19 MAR 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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