Probiotic LGG and Butyrate Rapidly Increase Bone Density

Probiotic LGG and Butyrate Rapidly Increase Bone Density

Probiotics increase bone volume in healthy mice

“We were surprised by the potency of the gut microbiome in regulating bone and by the complexity of the mechanism of action of probiotics,” Pacifici says. “In general, there is a lot of interest in the concept that the gut bacteria regulate the function of distant organs. How this happens is largely unknown. We described a detailed mechanism by which changes in the composition of the gut microbiome induced by probiotics affect a distant system like the skeleton.”

Immunity, Tyagi and Yu et al.: “The Microbial Metabolite Butyrate Stimulates Bone Formation via T Regulatory Cell-Mediated Regulation of WNT10B Expression” https://www.cell.com/immunity/fulltext/S1074-7613(18)30478-3 , DOI: 10.1016/j.immuni.2018.10.013

Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, butyrate, microbiota, bone formation, probiotics, short-chain fatty acids, Wnt10b, NFAT, T cells, regulatory T cell, bone volume, bone density, skeletal, spine

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older women

Probiotics can protect the skeletons of older women

Among older women who received probiotics, bone loss was halved compared to women who received only a placebo. The research opens the door to a new way to prevent fractures among the elderly.

Anna G. Nilsson, Daniel Sundh, Fredrik Bäckhed, Mattias Lorentzon. Lactobacillus reuteri reduces bone loss in older women with low bone mineral density – a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, clinical trial. Journal of Internal Medicine, 2018; DOI: 10.1111/joim.12805

Common osteoporosis drug slows formation of new bone

Contact: Jenni Glenn Gingery jgingery@endo-society.org 301-941-0240 The Endocrine Society

Study results suggest combination treatments may be needed to stop bone loss, fuel growth

Chevy Chase, MD––Although the drug zoledronic acid slows bone loss in osteoporosis patients, it also boosts levels of a biomarker that stops bone formation, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Osteoporosis weakens bones and increases the risk patients will suffer fractures. The findings suggest combination therapy may be a more effective approach to battling this common condition.

“The key to effectively treating osteoporosis lies in increasing bone mass,” said the study’s lead author, Antonino Catalano, MD, PhD, of the University of Messina in Italy. “Zoledronic acid halts bone loss, but it also signals the body to stop forming new bone mass. The drug may need to be combined with other treatments to add bone mass.”

The prospective intervention study followed the treatment of 40 postmenopausal women at an ambulatory care center. Half of the women received zoledronic acid, and half received a placebo. Levels of sclerostin – a biomarker that inhibits bone formation – increased among the participants who were treated with zoledronic acid.

“The data points to an opportunity to increase bone mass by combining zoledronic acid with a drug that suppresses the resulting sclerostin’s effect,” Catalano said. “An innovative combination therapy using zoledronic acid and selective antibodies to block the sclerostin could simultaneously stop bone loss and encourage new bone formation. This is an important avenue for researchers to explore as they develop new osteoporosis treatments.”

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Other researchers working on the study include: N. Morabito, G. Basile, S. Brancatelli, D. Cucinotta and A. Lasco of the University of Messina.

The article, “Zoledronic Acid Acutely Increases Sclerostin Serum Levels in Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis,” appears in the May 2013 issue of JCEM.

Founded in 1916, The Endocrine Society is the world’s oldest, largest and most active organization devoted to research on hormones and the clinical practice of endocrinology.  Today, The Endocrine Society’s membership consists of over 16,000 scientists, physicians, educators, nurses and students in more than 100 countries. Society members represent all basic, applied and clinical interests in endocrinology. The Endocrine Society is based in Chevy Chase, Maryland. To learn more about the Society and the field of endocrinology, visit our site at http://www.endo-society.org. Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/#!/EndoMedia.

Osteoporosis Drugs, Reduce Fracture Risk by ONLY 0.9% according to studies

Contact: Emma Dickinson edickinson@bmj.com 44-020-738-36529 BMJ-British Medical Journal

Value of drugs for pre-osteoporosis exaggerated

Drugs for pre-osteoporosis: Prevention or disease-mongering?

Public release date: 17-Jan-2008

A series of recent scientific publications have exaggerated the benefits and underplayed the harms of drugs to treat pre-osteoporosis or “osteopenia” potentially encouraging treatment in millions of low risk women, warn experts in this week’s BMJ.

The authors believe that this represents a classic case of disease-mongering: a risk factor being transformed into a medical disease in order to sell tests and drugs to relatively healthy people.

Osteopenia or “pre-osteoporosis” is said to affect around half of all older women and, in at least one country, drug companies have already begun to market their drugs to women with osteopenia, based on re-analyses of four osteoporosis drug trials.

But the authors of this week’s BMJ paper argue that this move raises serious questions about the benefit-risk ratio for low risk individuals, and about the costs of medicalising and potentially treating an enormous group of healthy people.

These reanalyses tend to exaggerate the benefits of drug therapy, they say. For example, the authors of one reanalysis cite a 75% relative risk reduction, though this translates into only a 0.9% reduction in absolute risk.

In other words, up to 270 women with pre-osteoporosis might need to be treated with drugs for three years so that one of them could avoid a single vertebral fracture.

Most of the reanalyses also play down the harms of drug therapy, they add. For example, the reanalysis of data for the drug raloxifene focuses solely on the potential benefits, with no mention of an increased risk of blood clots.

Finally, like much of the published literature on osteoporosis, these analyses have potential conflicts of interest, they write. For instance, all of the original drug trials being re-analysed were funded by industry and, in three out of four cases, drug company employees were part of the team conducting the reanalyses.

The World Health Organisation is currently developing guidance on how to deal with women categorised as having osteopenia. Whether this will stop industry efforts to encourage treatment in low risk women is, however, questionable, they say.

“We need to ask whether the coming wave of marketing targeting those women with pre-osteoporosis will result in the sound effective prevention of fractures or the unnecessary and wasteful treatment of millions more healthy women,” they conclude.

Repsoted study from 2008…Requested repost