Using personal frequency to control brain activity

Individual frequency can be used to specifically influence certain areas of the brain and thus the abilities processed in them – solely by electrical stimulation on the scalp, without any surgical intervention. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have now demonstrated this for the first time.

Source: Using personal frequency to control brain activity

A novel strategy for quickly identifying twitter trolls

Two algorithms that account for distinctive use of repeated words and word pairs require as few as 50 tweets to accurately distinguish deceptive ”troll” messages from those posted by public figures. Sergei Monakhov of Friedrich Schiller University in Jena, Germany, presents these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on August 12, 2020.

Source: A novel strategy for quickly identifying twitter trolls

Untapped potential for TikTok to convey COVID-19 guidance

Research published in DeGruyter’s International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health suggests TikTok is rich with untapped educational potential. The platform could play a vital role in conveying important health information alongside lip-syncing videos and viral dance challenges, the paper’s authors say.

Source: Untapped potential for TikTok to convey COVID-19 guidance

Honeysuckle Decoction Inhibits SARS-CoV-2

In a new study in Cell Discovery, Chen-Yu Zhang’s group at Nanjing University and two other groups from Wuhan Institute of Virology and the Second Hospital of Nanjing present a novel finding that absorbed miRNA MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction (HD) can directly target SARS-CoV-2 genes and inhibit viral replication. Drinking of HD accelerate the negative conversion of COVID-19 patients.

#mir2911 #sarcov2 #honeysuckle

Zhou, L., Zhou, Z., Jiang, X. et al. Absorbed plant MIR2911 in honeysuckle decoction inhibits SARS-CoV-2 replication and accelerates the negative conversion of infected patients. Cell Discov 6, 54 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41421-020-00197-3

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-00197-3#ethics

Study: Most Americans don’t have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income

A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months.

Source: Study: Most Americans don’t have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income

An easier way to go vegan, Vitamin B12 CAN be produced during grain fermentation

The highest production was found in the rice bran (ca. 742 ng/g dw), followed by the buckwheat bran (ca. 631 ng/g dw), after fermentation. Meanwhile, the addition of L. brevis was able to dominate indigenous microbes during fermentation and thus greatly improve microbial safety during the fermentation of different grain materials. #b12 #vegan #fermentation https://helda.helsinki.fi/bitstream/handle/10138/317682/insitufo.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y In situ fortification of vitamin B12 in grain materials by fermentation withPropionibacterium freudenreichii, Chong Xie ISBN 978-951-51-6355-4 (PAPERBACK) ISBN 978-951-51-6356-1 (PDF, http://ETHESIS.HELSINKI.FI) ISSN 0355-1180 UNIGRAFIA HELSINKI 2020

Survey finds Americans social media habits changing as national tensions rise

A new national survey commissioned by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds more Americans are adjusting how they use social media platforms. Many participants cited stress from COVID-19 and divisive political issues as reasons for taking a social media break. The survey found more than half of Americans (56%) changed their social media habits because of tensions surrounding current events this year, and 1 in 5 (20%) have taken breaks from social media.

Source: Survey finds Americans social media habits changing as national tensions rise

Owe the IRS? No problem, some Americans say

A new study shows the surprising way that many American taxpayers adjust their standard of living when they owe money to the IRS versus when they receive tax refunds. Researchers found that when households received tax refunds, they immediately started spending that new money. But those same households didn’t cut their spending in years when they owed taxes to the IRS.

Source: Owe the IRS? No problem, some Americans say

Post-pandemic brave new world of agriculture

Recent events have shown how vulnerable the meat processing industry is to COVID-19. Professor Robert Henry says reducing risk of spreading infection in a future pandemic will require automation. But is the public ready for robots slaughtering and eviscerating animals to reduce the risk of infectious disease? And while there is ongoing resistance to GMOs and gene edited foods, Professor Henry says governments need policies to support these technologies, to safeguard regionally-based future food production.

Source: Post-pandemic brave new world of agriculture

A rebranding of ‘freedom’?

According to recent Gallup polls, socialism is now more popular than capitalism among Democrats and young people, and support for ”some form of socialism” among all Americans is at 43% (compared to 25% in 1942). Policies that went unmentioned or were declared out-of-bounds in elections four years ago — a federal jobs guarantee, single-payer health care, free college, massive tax hikes on the rich, and the Green New Deal–are commonplace in Democrats’ 2020 campaigns.

Source: A rebranding of ‘freedom’?

In cell studies, seaweed extract outperforms remdesivir in blocking COVID-19 virus

In a test of antiviral effectiveness against the virus that causes COVID-19, an extract from edible seaweeds substantially outperformed remdesivir, the current standard antiviral used to combat the disease.

Paul S. Kwon, Hanseul Oh, Seok-Joon Kwon, Weihua Jin, Fuming Zhang, Keith Fraser, Jung Joo Hong, Robert J. Linhardt, Jonathan S. Dordick. Sulfated polysaccharides effectively inhibit SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Cell Discovery, 2020; 6 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41421-020-00192-8

#fucoidan #covid19 #heparin

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41421-020-00192-8

Junk DNA might be really, really useful for biocomputing

When you don’t understand how things work, it’s not unusual to think of them as just plain old junk. So it was with DNA that repeats the same sequences over and over again; how could such junk DNA be useful? Isn’t it just garbage that nature didn’t bother to take out? In a paper published in Trends in Genetics, Dr. Alan Herbert of InsideOutBio Inc shows that these repeats may be more treasure than trash.

Source: Junk DNA might be really, really useful for biocomputing

Health, well-being and food security of families deteriorating under COVID-19 stress

The ongoing disruptive changes from efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19 are having a substantial negative impact on the physical and mental well-being of parents and their children across the country, according to a new national survey published today in Pediatrics.

Source: Health, well-being and food security of families deteriorating under COVID-19 stress

Black raspberries show promise for reducing skin inflammation, allergies

Pandemic disproportionately affects scientists with young children

The COVID-19 pandemic is having a disproportionate, negative impact on the careers of scientists with young children at home, a new survey finds. They have been forced to drastically reduce the amount of time they spend on their research, which could have long-term effects on their careers and could exacerbate existing inequalities.

Source: Pandemic disproportionately affects scientists with young children

Global sentiments towards COVID-19 shifts from fear to anger

The fear that people developed at the start of the COVID-19 outbreak has given way to anger over the course of the pandemic, a study of global sentiments led by NTU Singapore has found. Xenophobia, a common theme among anger-related tweets, evolved to reflect feelings arising from isolation and social seclusion. Accompanying this later shift is the emergence of tweets that show joy, which suggest a sense of gratitude and hope.

Source: Global sentiments towards COVID-19 shifts from fear to anger

Nitrous Oxide May bring quick relief from PTSD

Nitrous Oxide May bring quick relief from PTSD

For this new study, three veterans with PTSD were asked to inhale a single one-hour dose of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen through a face mask. Within hours after breathing nitrous oxide, two of the patients reported a marked improvement in their PTSD symptoms. This improvement lasted one week for one of the patients, while the other patient’s symptoms gradually returned over the week.

#ptsd #relief #nitrousoxide

https://www.psychiatrist.com/JCP/article/Pages/2020/v81/20l13393.aspx

Andrea Varias, Peter van Roessel, Maryam Parsiani, Maria Filippou-Frye, Thomas C. Neylan, Peter Nagele, Jerome Yesavage, J. David Clark, Carolyn I. Rodriguez. Does Nitrous Oxide Help Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder? A Case Series. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 2020; 81 (4) DOI: 10.4088/JCP.20l13393

Ups and downs in COVID-19 data may be caused by data reporting practices

As data accumulates on COVID-19 cases and deaths, researchers have observed patterns of peaks and valleys that repeat on a near-weekly basis. A study published this week in mSystems reports that those oscillations arise from variations in testing practices and data reporting, rather than from societal practices around how people are infected or treated.

Source: Ups and downs in COVID-19 data may be caused by data reporting practices

Women, newborns, young children and adolescents lose 20 percent of health and social services to COVID-19

Health systems worldwide are massively struggling and services for mothers, newborns, young children and adolescents are crumbling, warns the UN Secretary-General’s Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent reviewing the impact of COVID-19. Especially worrisome: declines in access to life-saving vaccines for children and maternal health services due to closures and movement restrictions. Immunization campaigns are being halted and health workers are being diverted from maternity to COVID-19.

Source: Women, newborns, young children and adolescents lose 20 percent of health and social services to COVID-19

Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don’t transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall

Based on one new and three recent studies, the authors of this commentary in Pediatrics conclude that children rarely transmit Covid-19, either among themselves or to adults. Based on the evidence, the authors recommend that schools reopen in the fall, since staying home can adversely affect children’s development.

Source: Commentary in Pediatrics: Children don’t transmit Covid-19, schools should reopen in fall

Far-UVC light safely kills ( or inactivate ) airborne coronaviruses

Far-UVC light safely kills ( or inactivate ) airborne coronaviruses

The researchers found that more than 99.9% of the exposed virus had been killed by a very low exposure to far-UVC light.

Based on their results, the researchers estimate that continuous exposure to far-UVC light at the current regulatory limit would kill 90% of airborne viruses in about 8 minutes, 95% in about 11 minutes, 99% in about 16 minutes, and 99.9% in about 25 minutes.

Manuela Buonanno, David Welch, Igor Shuryak, David J. Brenner. Far-UVC light (222 nm) efficiently and safely inactivates airborne human coronaviruses. Scientific Reports, 2020; 10 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-67211-2

#uvc222 #faruvc #virus

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-67211-2

uvc 222, safe uvc, uvc 254, virus, coronavirus, inactivation, disinfect, public, commercial use, biophysics, emerging, light, 222 wavelength, 254 wavelength, seasonal, airborne, aerosol, indoor, transportation, regulatory, very low exposure

Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people’s eating habits

Archaeologists from Cardiff University and the University of Sheffield have combined the latest scientific methods to offer new insights into life during the Norman Conquest of England. Until now, the story of the Conquest has primarily been told from evidence of the elite classes of the time. But little has been known about how it affected everyday people’s lives.

Source: Norman Conquest of 1066 did little to change people’s eating habits

Study: 35% of excess deaths in pandemic’s early months tied to causes other than COVID-19

Since COVID-19’s spread to the United States earlier this year, death rates in the U.S. have risen significantly. But deaths attributed to COVID-19 only account for about two-thirds of the increase in March and April, according to a study published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Source: Study: 35% of excess deaths in pandemic’s early months tied to causes other than COVID-19

States with highest income inequality experienced a larger number of COVID-19 deaths

States with the highest level of income inequality had a larger number of COVID-19-related deaths compared with states with lower income inequality. For instance, New York state, with the highest income inequality, had a mortality rate of 51.7 deaths per 100,000. This is 125 times greater than Utah, the state with the lowest income inequality and which had a mortality of 0.41 per 100,000 at the end of the period studied.

Source: States with highest income inequality experienced a larger number of COVID-19 deaths

Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light

Declining eyesight improved by looking at deep red light

Staring at a deep red light for three minutes a day can significantly improve declining eyesight, finds a new study, the first of its kind in humans.

#vision #eyesight #redlight

Glen Jeffery, Magella Neveu, Victor Chong, Chris Hogg, Sobha Sivaprasad, Manjot Grewal, Harpreet Shinhmar. Optically improved mitochondrial function redeems aged human visual decline. The Journals of Gerontology: Series A, 2020; DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glaa155

https://academic.oup.com/biomedgerontology/article-abstract/doi/10.1093/gerona/glaa155/5863431?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Ocean in Jupiter’s moon Europa

A new model from NASA scientists supports the theory that the interior ocean in Jupiter’s moon Europa would be able to sustain life. In addition they have calculated that this water, believed to be an ocean under the surface ice shell, could have been formed by breakdown of water-containing minerals due to either tidal forces or radioactive decay. This new work is presented at the virtual Goldschmidt conference.

Source: Ocean in Jupiter’s moon Europa