Dropping ‘no-war’ pledge a part of Abe’s strategy

 

By CAI HONG, ZHOU WA and REN QI (China Daily) 08:41, January 20, 2014

Increases the bookmark digg Google Delicious buzz friendfeed Linkedin diigo stumbleupon Qzone QQ Microblog Experts say move represents another gesture embracing militarist past

A longtime no-war pledge has disappeared from Japan’s Liberal Democratic Party’s annual working policy revealed on Sunday, while the ruling party vowed to continue visits to the controversial Yasukuni Shrine and push ahead constitutional revision, in another move leading the country in a far-right direction, observers said.

At its 81st LDP annual convention in Tokyo, the party removed the pledge that Japan would “never wage a war”, China Central Television reported on Sunday. Continue reading “Dropping ‘no-war’ pledge a part of Abe’s strategy”

China memorial to Korean assassin sparks Japan feud

Politics Jan. 20, 2014 – 02:59PM JST

China memorial to Korean assassin sparks Japan feud
South Korean conservative activists burn placards during a protest to complain against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe visiting the Yasukuni war shrine, in Seoul on Dec 27.AFP

BEIJING —

A new Asian diplomatic row broke out Monday after China unveiled a memorial to a Korean national hero who assassinated a Japanese official a century ago—with Tokyo condemning him as a “terrorist”.

In 1909, Ahn Jung-Geun shot and killed Hirobumi Ito, Japan’s first prime minister and its top official in Japanese-occupied Korea, at the railway station in the northeast Chinese city of Harbin.

Ahn was hanged by Japanese forces the following year, when Korea also formally became a Japanese colony, heralding a brutal occupation that lasted until the end of World War II in 1945. Continue reading “China memorial to Korean assassin sparks Japan feud”

Chinese leaders will not speak with Abe / the Chinese people will certainly not welcome him

(Xinhua) 07:11, December 31, 2013

BEIJING, Dec. 30 — Chinese leaders will not have any dialogue with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said here Monday.

“In regard to such a Japanese leader, the Chinese people will certainly not welcome him, and the Chinese leaders will unquestionably not speak with him either,” Qin said at a regular press briefing.

Qin made the remarks in response to a question on whether China will allow Abe to visit China or whether Chinese leaders will meet with Abe.

“Abe has made wrong calculations on China-Japan relations and made one mistake after another,” Qin said. Continue reading “Chinese leaders will not speak with Abe / the Chinese people will certainly not welcome him”

China must retaliate for Japanese prime minister’s war shrine visit: official media

Official media warns China will become a ‘paper tiger’ if countermeasures against Japan are not taken over Yasukuni visit

PUBLISHED : Friday, 27 December, 2013, 11:46am
UPDATED : Friday, 27 December, 2013, 12:16pm

Agence France-Presse in Beijing

abe_pek50_40011785.jpg

Japan’s ambassador to China Masato Kitera (centre) in Beijing after being summoned by China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi. Photo: Reuters

China must take “excessive” counter-measures after Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s controversial war shrine visit, state-run media urged on Friday, reflecting the smouldering resentment among Chinese at its onetime invader. Continue reading “China must retaliate for Japanese prime minister’s war shrine visit: official media”

China, Japan tense over disputed islands : Eight Chinese government ships had entered waters near the contested islands

CNN — Apr 24

 

The fragile relationship between China and Japan came under fresh strain Tuesday as ships from both sides crowded into the waters around a disputed group of islands and nearly 170 Japanese lawmakers visited a controversial war memorial.

 

The Japanese Coast Guard said eight Chinese government ships had entered waters near the contested islands in the East China Sea on Tuesday morning, the largest number to do so at any one time since tensions surrounding the territorial dispute escalated last year.China said its ships were there to monitor the movements of Japanese vessels in the area after a Japanese nationalist group chartered a flotilla of fishing boats to take dozens of activists there.

The Japanese foreign ministry responded by summoning the Chinese ambassador in Tokyo to lodge a strong protest about the Chinese ships’ presence near the uninhabited islands that lie between Okinawa and Taiwan and are known as Senkaku in Japanese and Diaoyu in Chinese.

A day earlier, Beijing had made its own protest to Tokyo about a visit at the weekend by three Japanese cabinet ministers to the Yasukuni Shrine in Tokyo, which honors Japanese people killed while fighting for their country, including convicted war criminals.

Countries that suffered heavily at the hands of the Japanese military before and during World War II, such as China and South Korea, consider the shrine as an emblem of that aggressive period in Japanese history.

Tensions rise over Asian islands Why is Japan feuding over islands? Japan scrambles fighter jets But China’s representations failed to deter 168 Japanese members of parliament from visiting the shrine on Tuesday to pay their respects to the war dead, the most to do so in recent years.

去年9月の国有化以来、最も多い8隻が領海侵犯をしています。