Aging really is ‘in your head’

  Scientists answer hotly debated questions about how calorie restriction delays aging process September 3, 2013 By Lee Phillion   Among scientists, the role of proteins called sirtuins in enhancing longevity has been hotly debated, driven by contradictory results from many different scientists. But new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis…

Tumors disable immune cells by using up sugar

Contact: Michael C. Purdy purdym@wustl.edu 314-286-0122 Washington University School of Medicine Cancer cells’ appetite for sugar may have serious consequences for immune cell function, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have learned. The scientists found that when they kept sugar away from critical immune cells called T cells, the cells no…

Emerging cancer drugs may drive bone tumors

February 12, 2013 By Julia Evangelou Strait Chang Yang, MD, PhD   Investigational cancer drugs, IAP antagonists, may increase the risk of tumors spreading to bone. Tumors often cause bone loss, but IAP antagonist treatment accelerates the problem. Cancer drugs should kill tumors, not encourage their spread. But new evidence suggests that an otherwise promising…

76th Health Research Report 25 FEB 2010 – Reconstruction

    Top Five: 1. Bitter melon extract attacks breast cancer cells 2. Vitamin B3 shows early promise in treatment of stroke 3. New evidence that green tea may help fight glaucoma and other eye diseases 4. Lactobacillus improves Helicobacter pylori infected gastritis 5. Flower power can still calm the masses In this issue: 1.…

Mice at risk of asthma, allergies can fight off skin cancer

  Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait straitj@wustl.edu 314-286-0141 Washington University School of Medicine A molecule involved in asthma and allergies has now been shown to make mice resistant to skin cancer, according to scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The molecule, called TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin), is produced by damaged skin and…

Diverse intestinal viruses may play a role in AIDS progression

Contact: Elisabeth Lyons elyons@cell.com 617-386-2121 Cell Press In monkeys and humans with AIDS, damage to the gastrointestinal tract is common, contributing to activation of the immune system, progressive immune deficiency, and ultimately advanced AIDS. How this gastric damage occurs has remained a mystery, but now researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Cell provide new…

Natural compound helps reverse diabetes in mice – nicotinamide mononucleotide / NAD

Contact: Julia Evangelou Strait straitj@wustl.edu 314-286-0141 Washington University School of Medicine Natural compound helps reverse diabetes in mice Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have restored normal blood sugar metabolism in diabetic mice using a compound the body makes naturally. The finding suggests that it may one day be possible for…

Chemotherapy contributes to relapse in cancer patients by damaging DNA and generating new mutations that allow tumor cells to evolve and become resistant to treatment.

The chemotherapy drugs required to push a common form of adult leukemia into remission may contribute to DNA damage that can lead to a relapse of the disease in some patients, findings of a new study suggest. The research, by a team of physicians and scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis,…