Study examines expedited FDA drug approvals, safety questions remain / Avg. Drug is tested on only 104 patients prior to approval

Contact: Renee Brehio rbrehio@ismp.org 704-831-8822 The JAMA Network Journals Fewer patients were studied as part of expedited reviews of new drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2008 and some safety questions remain unanswered, according to a study published by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication. The FDA is authorized…

Dietary fructose causes liver damage in animal model, study finds

Contact: Marguerite Beck marbeck@wakehealth.edu 336-716-2415 Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – June 19, 2013 – The role of dietary fructose in the development of obesity and fatty liver diseases remains controversial, with previous studies indicating that the problems resulted from fructose and a diet too high in calories. However, a new study conducted…

Researchers are first to use common virus to ‘fortify’ adult stem cells: “Basically, we’ve helped the cells be ‘invisible’ to the body’s natural killer cells, T cells and other aspects of the immune system”

Contact: Karen Richardson krchrdsn@wakehealth.edu 336-716-4453 Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center Researchers are first to use common virus to ‘fortify’ adult stem cells Potential uses of engineered cells include organ transplant and brain injury WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – April 1, 2013 – Using the same strategy that a common virus employs to evade the human immune system,…

Popular stomach acid reducer triples risk of developing pneumonia

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Shannon Koontz shkoontz@wfubmc.edu 336-716-2415 Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – A popular stomach-acid reducer used to prevent stress ulcers in critically ill patients needing breathing machine support increases the risk of those patients contracting pneumonia threefold, according to researchers at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Hospital-acquired…

Varenicline (Chantix™) Responsible for 90% of all reported suicides related to smoking- cessation drugs since 1998

Requested Repost 2Nov2011 WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. — The poor safety profile of the smoking-cessation drug varenicline (Chantix™) makes it unsuitable for first-line use, according to a study published in the Nov. 2 edition of the journal PLoS One, an online publication of the Public Library of Science. Varenicline, which already carries a “black box warning” from…