Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression

The objective of this study is to determine which foods are the most nutrient dense sources of nutrients demonstrated by human studies published in the current scientific literature to play a role in the prevention and promotion of recovery from depressive disorders.

LaChance LR, Ramsey D. Antidepressant foods: An evidence-based nutrient profiling system for depression. World J Psychiatry 2018; 8(3): 97-104

Vitamin B12 identified As An Effective Canker Sore Therapy

Vitamin B12 identified As An Effective Canker Sore Therapy

Vitamin B12 identified As An Effective Canker Sore Therapy

The researchers tested the effect of vitamin B12 on 58 randomly selected RAS patients who received either a dose of 1,000 mcg of B12 by mouth at bedtime or a placebo, and were tested monthly for six months. Approximately three quarters (74 percent) of the patients of the treated group and only a third (32 percent) of the control group achieved remission at the end of the study

Volkov et al. Effectiveness of Vitamin B12 in Treating Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 2009; 22 (1): 9 DOI: 10.3122/jabfm.2009.01.080113

Long-term use of common heartburn and ulcer medications linked to vitamin B12 deficiency

Contact: Cyrus Hedayati chedayati@golinharris.com 415-318-4377 Kaiser Permanente

OAKLAND, Calif. — Long-term use of commonly prescribed heartburn and ulcer medications is linked to a higher risk of vitamin B12 deficiency, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Continue reading “Long-term use of common heartburn and ulcer medications linked to vitamin B12 deficiency”

Can vitamin B supplements help stave off stroke? ( 7% reduction in 6 months )

Contact: Rachel Seroka rseroka@aan.com 612-928-6129 American Academy of Neurology

MINNEAPOLIS – New evidence suggests that taking vitamin B supplements may help reduce the risk of stroke. The research appears in the September 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

“Previous studies have conflicting findings regarding the use of vitamin B supplements and stroke or heart attack,” said author Xu Yuming, with Zhengzhou University in Zhengzhou, China. “Some studies have even suggested that the supplements may increase the risk of these events.”

For the research, scientists analyzed 14 randomized clinical trials with a total of 54,913 participants. All of the studies compared B vitamin use with a placebo or a very low-dose B vitamin. Participants were then followed for a minimum of six months. There were 2,471 strokes throughout the studies, all of which showed some benefit of taking vitamin B.

Vitamin B lowered the risk of stroke in the studies overall by seven percent. However, taking supplements did not appear to affect the severity of strokes or risk of death from stroke.

Folic acid, a supplemental form of folate (vitamin B9), which is often found in fortified cereals, appeared to reduce the effect of vitamin B. Researchers did not find a reduction in stroke risk for vitamin B12.

“Based on our results, the ability of vitamin B to reduce stroke risk may be influenced by a number of other factors such as the body’s absorption rate, the amount of folic acid or vitamin B12 concentration in the blood, and whether a person has kidney disease or high blood pressure,” said Yuming. “Before you begin taking any supplements, you should always talk to your doctor.”

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To learn more about stroke, please visit http://www.aan.com/patients.

The American Academy of Neurology, an association of more than 26,000 neurologists and neuroscience professionals, is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, brain injury, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit http://www.aan.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and YouTube.

Media Contacts: Rachel Seroka, rseroka@aan.com, (612) 928-6129 Michelle Uher, muher@aan.com, (612) 928-6120

69th Health Research Report 10 NOV 2009 – Reconstruction

 

 

Editors Top Five:

1. Scientists discover influenza’s Achilles heel: Antioxidants

2. Commentary warns of unexpected consequences of (antacid) proton pump inhibitor use in reflux disease

3. First national zinc campaign for childhood diarrhea increases awareness, but use lags behind

4. Mortality Rates Reduced among Children Whose Mothers Received Iron-folic Acid Supplements

5. Acetaminophen may be linked to asthma in children and adults

In this issue:

1. Why fish oils help and how they could help even more

2. Statins show dramatic drug and cell dependent effects in the brain

3. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Problems Associated with Low Folate Levels in Pregnant Women

4. Mortality Rates Reduced among Children Whose Mothers Received Iron-folic Acid Supplements

5. Exercise Keeps Dangerous Visceral Fat Away a Year After Weight Loss, Finds UAB Study

6. High fructose corn syrup: A recipe for hypertension

7. Low vitamin D levels explains most ESRD risk in African-Americans

8. Scientists discover influenza’s Achilles heel: Antioxidants

9. Pregnant women risk early delivery from using psychiatric medication

10. Commentary warns of unexpected consequences of proton pump inhibitor use in reflux disease

11. First national zinc campaign for childhood diarrhea increases awareness, but use lags behind

12. Study examines associations between antibiotic use during pregnancy and birth defects

13. Statins may worsen symptoms in some cardiac patients

14. Children who often drink full-fat milk weigh less

15. Does green tea prevent cancer? Evidence continues to brew, but questions remain

16. Acetaminophen may be linked to asthma in children and adults

17. Researchers explore new ways to prevent spinal cord damage using a vitamin B3 precursor

18. Antimicrobials: Silver (and copper) bullets to kill bacteria

19. People with less education could be more susceptible to the flu


Health Research Report

69th  Issue Date 10 NOV 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.engineeringevil.com

 

 

21st Health Research Report 26 DEC 2007 – Reconstruction

21st Health Research Report 26 DEC 2007 – Reconstruction (link below)

In This issue:

1. Elective Caesareans carry increased risk of breathing problems
2. Cholesterol-lowering drugs and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke
3. Turkish health workers condone wife beating
4. New clinical data shows chromium picolinate improves cognitive function
5. Green tea may protect brain cells against Parkinson’s disease
6. Vitamin B12 function may be diminished by excessive folate
7. Does treating worms in people with HIV slow progression to AIDS?
8. Walking and moderate exercise help prevent dementia
9. Breath test can discriminate between a bacterial overgrowth and IBS
10. Why don’t we get cancer all the time?
11. Why exertion leads to exhaustion
12. Why fish oil is good for you
 
http://healthresearchreport.me/2007/12/26/21st-health-research-report-26-dec-2007-reconstruction/