Flu vaccine backfires in pigs / vaccinated against H1N2 influenza were more vulnerable to the rarer H1N1 strain

Antibodies against one strain increase risk of infection with another. Beth Mole 28 August 2013 Pigs vaccinated against H1N2 influenza were more vulnerable to the rarer H1N1 strain. Andy Rouse/Photoshot Preventing seasonal sniffles may be more complicated than researchers suspected. A vaccine that protects piglets from one common influenza virus also makes them more vulnerable…

High-salt diet and ulcer bug combine to increase risk of cancer : ” Every animal on the high salt diet developed cancer “

Contact: Jim Sliwa jsliwa@asmusa.org 202-942-9297 American Society for Microbiology Numerous epidemiologic studies have shown that a diet high in salt is associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Now Timothy L. Cover and colleagues of Vanderbilt University show that high dietary salt combined with infection by the ulcer-causing bacterium Helicobacter pylori greatly increases the…

Molecular link between diabetes and schizophrenia connects food and mood

2010 study posted for filing   Contact: Leigh MacMillan leigh.macmillan@vanderbilt.edu 615-322-4747 Vanderbilt University Medical Center Defects in insulin function – which occur in diabetes and obesity – could directly contribute to psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia. Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators have discovered a molecular link between impaired insulin signaling in the brain and schizophrenia-like behaviors…

Pig Virus DNA Found in Rotavirus Vaccine : Millions of children worldwide, including 1 million in the U.S. exposed

2010 report posted for filing FDA: No Problems Seen in 1 Million U.S. Kids Who Got Rotarix Vaccine WASHINGTON — U.S. health officials urged pediatricians Monday to temporarily stop using one of two vaccines against a leading cause of diarrhea in babies, after discovering that doses of GlaxoSmithKline’s Rotarix were contaminated with bits of an…

UNC, Vanderbilt discover a new live vaccine approach for SARS and novel coronaviruses : By accelerating the rate of mutations

Contact: Carole Bartoo carole.bartoo@vanderbilt.edu 615-322-4747 Vanderbilt University Medical Center UNC, Vanderbilt discover a new live vaccine approach for SARS and novel coronaviruses Rapid mutation has long been considered a key to viral adaptation to environmental change. But in the case of the coronavirus responsible for deadly severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), collaborating researchers at the…

Calcium may only protect against colorectal cancer in presence of magnesium

2008 study posted for filing   Contact: Jeremy Moore Jeremy.moore@aacr.org 267-646-0557 American Association for Cancer Research High magnesium intake has been associated with low risk of colorectal cancer. Americans have similar average magnesium intake as East Asian populations. If that were all that were involved, observers might expect both groups to have similar risk for…

Survivors of 1918 flu pandemic protected with a lifetime immunity to virus

Contact: Mount Sinai Newsroom newsmedia@mssm.edu 212-241-9200 The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine New research has discovered that infection and natural exposure to the 1918 influenza virus made survivors immune to the disease for the remaining of their lives. Antibodies produced by cells isolated from these survivors served as an effective therapy…

Aggression as rewarding as sex, food and drugs

Contact: Melanie Moran melanie.moran@vanderbilt.edu 615-322-2706 Vanderbilt University NASHVILLE, Tenn.—New research from Vanderbilt University shows for the first time that the brain processes aggression as a reward – much like sex, food and drugs – offering insights into our propensity to fight and our fascination with violent sports like boxing and football. The research will be…