Brain-to-brain breakthrough in mind control experiment

Two minds with but a single thought as University of  Washington researcher controls colleague’s hand movements   LAST UPDATED AT 13:48 ON Wed 28 Aug  2013 SCIENTISTS have achieved human mind control for the first time in an  experiment at the University of Washington. Using recorded brain signals and the  magnetic stimulation of muscles, researchers…

Study links chemicals widely found in plastics and processed food to elevated blood pressure in children and teens

Contact: Lorinda Klein lorindaann.klein@nyumc.org 212-404-3533 NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine Data from nearly 3,000 children shows dietary exposure to certain plastics may play a hidden role in epidemic increases in childhood hypertension NEW YORK, May 22, 2013. Plastic additives known as phthalates (pronounced THAL-ates) are odorless, colorless and just…

Could eating peppers prevent Parkinson’s?

Contact: Dawn Peters sciencenewsroom@wiley.com 781-388-8408 Wiley Dietary nicotine may hold protective key New research reveals that Solanaceae—a flowering plant family with some species producing foods that are edible sources of nicotine—may provide a protective effect against Parkinson’s disease. The study appearing today in Annals of Neurology, a journal of the American Neurological Association and Child…

Smart dust computers are no bigger than a snowflake

  26 April 2013 by Mark Anderson Magazine issue 2914.  Subscribe and save Thousands of tiny computers that scavenge power from their surroundings could one day be used to monitor your world THOUGHT your smartphone or tablet packed a big punch for its size? Pah, that’s nothing. The next generation of computers will be able…

Nearly half of veterans found with blast concussions might have hormone deficiencies

Contact: Donna Krupa dkrupa@the-aps.org American Physiological Society Condition often unrecognized, mimics symptoms of PTSD, depression BOSTON—Up to 20 percent of veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq have experienced at least one blast concussion. New research suggests that nearly half these veterans may have a problem so under-recognized that even military physicians may fail to look…

Study: Husbands who do more traditionally female housework have less sex

Contact: Daniel Fowler pubinfo@asanet.org 202-527-7885 American Sociological Association WASHINGTON, DC, January 24, 2013 — Married men who spend more time doing traditionally female household tasks—including cooking, cleaning, and shopping—report having less sex than husbands who don’t do as much, according to a new study in the February issue of the American Sociological Review. “Our findings…

Do we live in a computer simulation? UW researchers say idea can be tested

By Vince StricherzNews and Information A decade ago, a British philosopher put forth the notion that the universe we live in might in fact be a computer simulation run by our descendants. While that seems far-fetched, perhaps even incomprehensible, a team of physicists at the University of Washington has come up with a potential test…

Long-term effects of statin therapy could lead to transient or permanent cognitive impairment

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Nick Zagorski nzagorski@asbmb.org 301-634-7366 American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Statins show dramatic drug and cell dependent effects in the brain Besides their tremendous value in treating high cholesterol and lowering the risk of heart disease, statins have also been reported to potentially lower the risks of other…

Scientists cure color blindness in monkeys

2009 study posted for filing Contact: John Pastor jdpastor@ufl.edu 352-273-5815 University of Florida GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Researchers from the University of Washington and the University of Florida used gene therapy to cure two squirrel monkeys of color blindness — the most common genetic disorder in people. Writing online Wednesday in the journal Nature, scientists cast…

Pacemakers Vulnerable to Hackers: Malicious hackers can kill

2008 posted for filing Contact: Claire Bowles claire.bowles@newscientist.com 44-207-611-1210 New Scientist How to stop a new type of heart attack PACEMAKERS are supposed to protect people from heart attacks. But to do that they have to provide digital as well as biological security. Earlier this year, a team led by William Maisel at Harvard Medical…

Toxic chemicals found in common scented laundry products, air fresheners

Contact: Hannah Hickey hickeyh@u.washington.edu 206-543-2580 University of Washington A University of Washington study of top-selling laundry products and air fresheners found the products emitted dozens of different chemicals. All six products tested gave off at least one chemical regulated as toxic or hazardous under federal laws, but none of those chemicals was listed on the…