Beating the bulge with OOLONG tea

“researchers found that both oolong tea and pure caffeine increased fat breakdown by about 20% in the healthy volunteers compared with the placebo, and that oolong tea continued to have an effect while the participants were asleep”

#metabolism #oolongtea #bodyfat

Subacute Ingestion of Caffeine and Oolong Tea Increases Fat Oxidation without Affecting Energy Expenditure and Sleep Architecture: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blinded Cross-Over Trial

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/12/3671/htm

oolong tea, fat oxidation, metabolism, sleep, caffeine, Camellia sinensis, tea, cup of tea, energy expenditure, whole room indirect calorimetry, respiratory quotient, carbohydrate oxidation, body temperature, caffeine tolerance

Rose Scent Dramatically Improves Learning

Rose Scent Dramatically Improves Learning

Rose Scent Dramatically Improves Learning

“The students showed a significant increase in learning success by about 30 percent if the incense sticks were used during both the learning and sleeping phases,” says Neumann. The results also suggest that the additional use of the incense sticks during the vocabulary test promotes memory.

#rose #memory #learning

Neumann, F., Oberhauser, V. & Kornmeier, J. How odor cues help to optimize learning during sleep in a real life-setting. Sci Rep 10, 1227 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-57613-7

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-57613-7#citeas

rose scent, rose aroma, rose, learning, memory encoding, tmr, consolidation, sleep, improve, help, test scores, testing

Bad sleep around full moon is no longer a myth

Contact: Olivia Poisson olivia.poisson@unibas.ch University of Basel

Many people complain about poor sleep around full moon. Scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland now report evidence that lunar cycles and human sleep behavior are in fact connected. The results have been published in the journal «Current Biology».

The research group around Prof. Christian Cajochen of the Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel analyzed the sleep of over 30 volunteers in two age groups in the lab. While they were sleeping, the scientists monitored their brain patterns, eye movements and measured their hormone secretions. The findings suggest that even today, despite the comforts of modern life, humans still responds to the geophysical rhythms of the moon.

Short And Poor Sleep

The data show that both the subjective and the objective perception of the quality of sleep changed with the lunar cycles. Around full moon, brain activity in the areas related to deep sleep dropped by 30 percent. People also took five minutes longer to fall asleep and they overall slept for 20 minutes less. The volunteers felt as though their sleep had been poorer during full moon and they showed lower levels of melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep and wake cycles. «This is the first reliable evidence that lunar rhythm can modulate sleep structure in humans», Cajochen says.

A Relic From The Past According to the researchers, this circalunar rhythm might be a relic from past times, when the moon was responsible for synchronizing human behavior. This is well known for other animals, especially marine animals, where moon light coordinates reproduction behavior. Today, other influences of modern life, such as electric light, masked the moon’s influence on us. However, the study shows that in the controlled environment of the laboratory with a strict study protocol, the moon’s hold over us can be made visible and measurable again.

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Original Citation

Christian Cajochen, Songül Altanay-Ekici, Mirjam Münch, Sylvia Frey, Vera Knoblauch, and Anna Wirz-Justice

Evidence that the Lunar Cycle Influences Human Sleep

Current Biology, August 05, 2013 issue | doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2013.06.029

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2013.06.029

‘Blue’ Light Could Help Teenagers Combat Stress

A new study shows that exposure to morning short-wavelength “blue” light has the potential to help sleep-deprived adolescents prepare for the challenges of the day and deal with stress, more so than dim light. (Credit: © Beboy / Fotolia)

ScienceDaily (Oct. 22, 2012) — Adolescents can be chronically sleep deprived because of their inability to fall asleep early in combination with fixed wakeup times on school days. According to the CDC, almost 70 percent of school children get insufficient sleep — less than 8 hours on school nights. This type of restricted sleep schedule has been linked with depression, behavior problems, poor performance at school, drug use, and automobile accidents. A new study from the Lighting Research Center (LRC) at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that exposure to morning short-wavelength “blue” light has the potential to help sleep-deprived adolescents prepare for the challenges of the day and deal with stress, more so than dim light.

The study was a collaboration between Associate Professor and Director of the LRC Light and Health Program Mariana Figueiro and LRC Director and Professor Mark S. Rea. Results of the study were recently published in the open access International Journal of Endocrinology.

Levels of cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal gland, follow a daily 24-hour rhythm. Cortisol concentrations are low throughout the day reaching a broad minimum in the evening before rising slowly again throughout the night. In addition to this gradual elevation of cortisol at night, cortisol levels rise sharply within the first 30 to 60 minutes after waking. This is known as the cortisol awakening response (CAR). In nocturnal animals, the cortisol spike occurs at night, at the start of activity. It appears to be associated with the time of transition from rest to activity, upon waking. A high CAR has been associated with better preparedness for stressful and challenging activities.

“The present results are the first to show that low levels of short-wavelength light enhance CAR in adolescents who were restricted from sleep,” said Figueiro. “Morning light exposure may help to wake up the body when it is time to be active, thus preparing individuals for any environmental stress they might experience.”

Short-wavelength light has been shown to maximally suppress production of nocturnal melatonin and phase shift the timing of the biological clock. The effect of short-wavelength light on other biomarkers has not been widely studied.

The study included three overnight sessions, at least one week apart. All participants wore a Dimesimeter on a wrist band to measure light exposure and to verify the regularity of their activity/rest periods during the three-week study. The Dimesimeter is a small calibrated light meter device developed by the LRC that continuously records circadian light and activity levels. During the study, adolescents aged 12 to 17 years went to sleep at 1:30 a.m. and woke up at 6:00 a.m., a 4.5-hour sleep opportunity. Each week, participants either experienced morning short-wavelength blue light (40 lux of 470-nanometer light) or remained in dim light.

“We found that exposure to short-wavelength blue light in the morning significantly enhances CAR in sleep deprived adolescents, more so than dim light,” said Rea. “Morning exposure to short-wavelength light may be a simple, yet practical way to better prepare adolescents for the challenges of the day.”

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121022112847.htm

Cholesterol-lowering drug linked to sleep disruptions – Possibly promoting weight gain and insulin resistance

Cholesterol-lowering drug linked to sleep disruptions

 

ORLANDO, Nov. 7 — A cholesterol-lowering drug appears to disrupt sleep patterns of some patients, researchers reported at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2007.

 

“The findings are significant because sleep problems can affect quality of life and may have adverse health consequences, such as promoting weight gain and insulin resistance,” said Beatrice Golomb, M.D., lead author of the study and an associate professor of medicine and family and preventive medicine at the University of California at San Diego School of Medicine

 

Because simvastatin is fat soluble it can more readily penetrate cell membranes and cross the blood brain barrier into the brain. The brain controls sleep, and many of the brain’s nerve cells are wrapped in a fatty insulating sheath called myelin.

 

“Several small studies were done early on, including those focused on lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins,” Golomb said. “Most (researchers) didn’t see a difference in sleep, but they had short durations of follow-up and enrolled just a handful of people — often fewer than 20, which was not enough to see a difference unless it was very large.

 

In this study, researchers tested 1,016 healthy adult men and women for six months in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial using simvastatin, given at 20 milligrams (mg), pravastatin at 40 mg, or a placebo. They assessed outcomes with the Leeds sleep scale, a visual analog scale of sleep quality, and a rating scale of sleep problems. Both scales were measured before and during treatment.

 

“Those who reported developing much worse sleep on study medication also showed a significant adverse change in aggression scores compared to others,” Golomb said “We should also point out that although the average effect on sleep was detrimental on simvastatin, this does not mean that everyone on simvastatin will experience worse sleep.”

* Requested Repost