Toronto doctor sentenced for abusing sedated patients

A Canadian doctor who sexually assaulted 21 sedated patients while they helplessly watched has been sentenced to 10 years in prison. Anaesthesiologist George Doodnaught, 65, abused the women, aged 25 to 75, while they were in his care. The victims testified that they had been conscious when Doodnaught kissed, fondled and assaulted them, but they…

Subclinical deficiencies of vitamin C and D have each been linked to psychological abnormalities

Public release date: 23-Sep-2010 HRR: Requested Repost – Patients administered vitamin C had a rapid and statistically and clinically significant improvement in mood state – “About one in five acute-care patients in our hospital have vitamin C levels so low as to be compatible with scurvy,” – Subclinical deficiencies of vitamin C and D have…

Staying on medication had surprisingly little effect lowering hospital readmission rates

Contact: Sarah Avery sarah.avery@duke.edu 919-660-1306 Duke University Medical Center Staying on medication may not translate to avoiding readmission DURHAM, N.C. – A targeted effort to help high-risk heart failure patients stay on their medications did improve adherence to drug regimens, but had surprisingly little effect lowering hospital readmission rates, according to a study at Duke…

U.S. hospital ICU admissions up 50 percent since 2002

Published: May 15, 2013 at 10:25 PM  WASHINGTON, May 15 (UPI) — Admissions to U.S.  hospital intensive care units jumped 50 percent from 2002 to 2009, but  researchers are not sure why. Lead author Peter Mullins of George Washington University’s School of Public Health and Health Services and colleagues found  ICU admissions rose from 2.79…

Donor network ‘pressured medics to declare patients dead so organs can be harvested’

‘This kid is dead, you got that?’ Donor network ‘pressured medics to declare  patients dead so organs can be harvested’ The New York Organ Donor Network accused of  bullying doctors into declaring patients brain dead when they are still alive so  they can strip them of their organs Whistleblower Patrick McMahon says one in  five…

Common bronchodilator linked to increased deaths

2008 Post for filing Contact: Marla Paul Marla-Paul@northwestern.edu 312-503-8928 Northwestern University CHICAGO — A common bronchodilator drug which has been used for more than a decade by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been linked to a one-third higher risk of cardiovascular-related deaths. The drug, ipratropium, is sold under the brand names Atrovent…

The drugs don’t work: a modern medical scandal

The doctors prescribing the drugs don’t know they don’t do what they’re meant to. Nor do their patients. The manufacturers know full well, but they’re not telling. Ben Goldacre The Guardian,   Friday 21 September 2012 18.00 EDT Drugs are tested by their manufacturers,  in poorly designed trials, on hopelessly small numbers of weird, unrepresentative patients, and…

Anemia of chronic disease: an adaptive response?

Re-Post for file 2008 Contact: Jennifer Paterson 613-798-5555 x19691 Canadian Medical Association Journal The anemia of chronic disease may be a beneficial, adaptive response to the underlying disease, rather than a negative effect of the illness, postulates an analysis article in CMAJ, http://www.cmaj.ca/press/pg333.pdf. The authors argue that anemia may be beneficial to patients with inflammatory…

How having an operation can send you delirious: Terrifying post-surgery hallucinations strike up to half of the over-65s: “can also leave people in a permanent state of confusion and suffering from dementia”

By Roger Dobson PUBLISHED:18:46 EST, 10  September 2012| UPDATED:18:46 EST, 10 September 2012 When Gordon Sturmey came around after  surgery, he was convinced people were trying to kill him. He believed a nurse was trying to poison him,  and he soon started to think his relatives were also involved. Gordon, 65, of Thatcham, Berkshire, had…

Stroke patients get helping hand from ‘telepathic’ robot arm which can respond to your thoughts

By Eddie Wrenn PUBLISHED:06:24 EST, 3  September 2012| UPDATED:06:24 EST, 3 September 2012   Stroke patients who have lose the use of  their arms could find a helping hand in the form of a robotic arm that can  ‘telepathically’ respond to your thoughts. The research, led by Rice University and the  University of Houston, has…

Mayo Clinic: Common blood pressure drug linked to severe GI problems: Celiac disease from Olmesartan/Benicar in the US, Olmetec in EU and Canada, WinBP, Golme in India, Erastapex in Egypt

Contact: Nick Hanson newsbureau@mayo.edu 507-284-5005 Mayo Clinic Patients in clinical trial taking Olmesartan had symptoms of celiac disease ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered an association between a commonly prescribed blood pressure drug, Olmesartan, and severe gastrointestinal issues such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss and electrolyte abnormalities — symptoms common among those…