Hemp shows strong potential for treating cancer

Hemp shows strong potential for treating cancer

Hemp shows strong potential for treating cancer

Results from some of the first studies to examine hemp’s ability to fight cancer show that it might one day be useful as plant-based treatment for ovarian cancer.

KY Hemp-induced Modulation of Ovarian Cancer Cell Metastasis: Sara Biela, Annie Wang, and Wasana K. Sumanasekera The FASEB Journal 2018 32:1_supplement, 667.7-667.7

Angelina Jolie fears she has only 3 years to live: Reports

Sun, Sep 22, 2013

Lollipop

Angelina Jolie is very concerned about her mortality, and is reportedly worried that she will die at a very young age due to her family history.

According to an article on Asian Town, reports reveal that the fiance of Brad Pitt and the mother of six young children worries she could have as little as three years to live.

Globe magazine reported that Angie is so concerned about dying that she has secretly written up a “bucket list” of goals to complete before she dies.

Angelina Jolie who is only 38-years-old recently underwent a preventive double mastectomy to minimize her risk of breast cancer and plans to have ­additional surgery due to an elevated risk of ovarian cancer.

Sources close to Brad and Angelina reveal:

“Angelina is trying to live her life to the fullest because she feels deep down that she doesn’t have much time left.

“She’s going to do everything she can to prolong her life but really believes she won’t even reach her mid-forties.”

Angelina’s worries about dying young are stemmed from her family history. Angie’s mother, Marcheline Ber­trand, died at 56 following a long battle with ovarian cancer. The actress also lost her maternal grandfather, grandmother and uncle to cancer.

“There is no longevity on my mother’s side,” An­gelina previously told Esquire magazine.

“She’s trying to cram everything into her life right now because she feels she could be gone in as little as three years,” revealed a concerned insider.

Family sources claim that this is one of the reasons that Angie and Brad have decided to go ahead and marry soon so there are no disputes when she passes on. She’s getting her affairs in order and wants her six children to be well taken care of.

 

http://www.divaasia.com/article/24037

Ginger causes ovarian cancer cells to die, U-M researchers find

2006 study posted for filing

Contact: Nicole Fawcett
nfawcett@umich.edu
734-764-2220
University of Michigan Health System

Cell studies show promise for ginger as potential ovarian cancer treatment

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Ginger is known to ease nausea and control inflammation. But researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center are investigating a new use for this age-old remedy: treating ovarian cancer.

In laboratory studies, researchers found ginger caused ovarian cancer cells to die. Further, the way in which the cells died suggests ginger may avoid the problem common in ovarian cancer of cells becoming resistant to standard treatments.

The researchers are presenting their results in a poster session at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting.

Researchers used ginger powder, similar to what is sold at grocery stores, only a standardized research grade. The ginger powder was dissolved in solution and applied to ovarian cancer cell cultures. Ginger induced cell death in all the ovarian cancer cell lines tested.

Moreover, the researchers found that ginger caused two types of cell death. One type, known as apoptosis, results from cancer cells essentially committing suicide. The other type of cell death, called autophagy, results from cells digesting or attacking themselves.

“Most ovarian cancer patients develop recurrent disease that eventually becomes resistant to standard chemotherapy – which is associated with resistance to apoptosis. If ginger can cause autophagic cell death in addition to apoptosis, it may circumvent resistance to conventional chemotherapy,” says study author J. Rebecca Liu, M.D., assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the U-M Medical School and a member of the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Study results are very preliminary, and researchers plan to test whether they can obtain similar results in animal studies. The appeal of ginger as a potential treatment for ovarian cancer is that it would have virtually no side effects and would be easy to administer as a capsule.

Ginger is effective at controlling inflammation, and inflammation contributes to the development of ovarian cancer cells. By halting the inflammatory reaction, the researchers suspect, ginger also stops cancer cells from growing.

“In multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ginger induced cell death at a similar or better rate than the platinum-based chemotherapy drugs typically used to treat ovarian cancer,” says Jennifer Rhode, M.D., a gynecologic oncology fellow at the U-M Medical School.

Liu’s lab is also looking at the effects on ovarian cancer of resveratrol, a substance found in red wine, and curcumin, the active ingredient in the curry spice turmeric. In addition, researchers at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center are investigating ginger to control nausea from chemotherapy and ginger to prevent colon cancer.

“Patients are using natural products either in place of or in conjunction with chemotherapy, and we don’t know if they work or how they work. We don’t know how these products interact with chemotherapy or other cancer treatments. There’s no good clinical data,” Liu says.

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More than 20,000 women are expected to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year, and 15,000 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society. For information about ovarian cancer, go to www.cancer.med.umich.edu/learn/ovarianinfo.htm or call the U-M Cancer AnswerLine at 800-865-1125.

In addition to Rhode and Liu, study authors are undergraduate student Jennifer Huang, research associates Sarah Fogoros and Lijun Tan, and Suzanna Zick, N.D., M.P.H., research investigator in family medicine.

Funding for the study was from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, National Institutes of Health.

Reference: American Association for Cancer Research 97th annual meeting, April 1-5, 2006, Washington, D.C.

Study: Routine ovarian cancer screenings are ineffective

By Agence France-Presse Tuesday, September 11, 2012 14:01 EDT

Racks test tubes filled with blood. Routine screening for ovarian cancer is ineffective and at times can do more harm than good, a panel of cancer specialists has concluded.

Routine screening for ovarian cancer is ineffective and at times can do more harm than good, a panel of cancer specialists has concluded.

“There is no existing method of screening for ovarian cancer that is effective in reducing deaths,” said US Preventive Services Task Force member and chair Dr Virginia Moyer.

“In fact, a high percentage of women who undergo screening experience false-positive test results and consequently may be subjected to unnecessary harms, such as major surgery,” added Moyer in a statement on the group’s website and in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The tests include ovarian scans and blood tests that look at a marker that can be linked to the disease.

The group said they are not recommended routinely for women who do not show signs of the disease, or who have genetic mutations (BRCA1 and BRCA2) that put them at a greater risk of developing it.

Other medical groups already have made similar recommendations including the “American Cancer Society” and “American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.”

Ovarian cancer is fairly rare with 22,200 new cases a year in the United States and 15,500 deaths

Study shows no evidence of a mortality benefit to PSA screening

Men enrolled in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer (PLCO) Screening Trial had no evidence of a mortality benefit compared to a control group of men undergoing usual care, according to a study published online Jan. 6 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening (PLCO) Trial is a multi-center, two-arm trial, which began enrollment in November 1993 with follow-up through December 2009, and was designed to evaluate the effect of screening on these specific cancers. The enrollees were aged 55-74 and had no previous personal history of these cancers. Men in the intervention arm underwent annual PSA testing for six years and annual digital rectal examination for four years, while those in the control arm received their usual medical care, which for some men included screening. A previous report of PLCO results through ten years was criticized for being too short of a follow-up period.

To determine longer-range outcomes among the men enrolled in PLCO, Gerald L. Andriole, M.D., of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and colleagues, examined outcomes of the men through 13 years. The researchers found a statistically significant 12% relative increase in the incidence rate of prostate cancer, and a non-statistically significant decrease in the incidence of high-grade prostate cancer in the intervention arm compared to the control arm, but no difference in mortality between the two arms.  In addition, there was no apparent differential effect of screening by age category, pre-trial PSA testing, or co-morbidity. 

The authors write, “Improvements in prostate cancer treatment are probably at least in part responsible for declining prostate cancer mortality rates. Even if life is only prolonged by therapy, the opportunities for competing causes of death increase, especially among older men.”

The authors also point out that of the 4250 prostate cancer case patients diagnosed in the intervention arm, 455 (10.7%) died of causes other than the cancer types studied; in the control arm, 3815 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer of whom 377 (9.9%) died, also of other causes. “Thus, a higher percentage of deaths from other causes rather than a deficit occurred among the prostate cancer patients diagnosed in the intervention arm, an indication of the over-diagnosis associated with PSA detection,” the authors write.

The researchers plan to again update the mortality findings from the prostate component of the PLCO after follow-up data through 15 years becomes available.

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Contact: Philip C. Prorok, prorokp@mail.nih.gov