A virus changes its stripes / human outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis

Contact: Jim Kelly jpkelly@utmb.edu 409-772-8791 University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Outbreak in Panama brought Latin America’s first human cases of eastern equine encephalitis In the summer of 2010, the eastern Panamanian province of Darien experienced a phenomenon that had never been seen before in Latin America: a human outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis.…

89th Health Research Report 14 SEP 2010 – Reconstruction

Health Research Report 89th Issue 14 SEP 2010 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano http://www.vit.bz http://www.youtube.com/vhfilm  http://www.facebook.com/engineeringevil http://www.engineeringevil.com   http://www.healthresearchreport.me  Editors Top Five: 1. Ghostwritten articles overstate benefits of hormone replacement therapy and downplay harms 2. Journal editors question sale of diet pill Meridia 3. BMJ report into top-selling diabetes drug raises concerns about the drug regulatory system 4. Liver…

Medication cuts crime rate among ADHD sufferers: results suggested that encouraging more ADHD sufferers to take medication could help to reduce crime and re-offending rates

Wed, 21 Nov 2012 22:00 GMT Reuters * Study of 25,000 people found ADHD drugs cut crime rates * Ritalin and other stimulants can help patients to focus * Experts say medication decisions must be personal choice By Kate Kelland LONDON, Nov 21 (Reuters) – Criminal behaviour in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)…

Vitamin E effective for ‘silent’ liver disease

2010 study posted for filing Contact: Jennifer Homa jeh9057@nyp.org 212-305-5587 New York- Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center NIH-funded, NEJM study is largest ever to look at nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, an obesity-related condition NEW YORK (April 29, 2010) — Vitamin E has been shown effective in treating nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), an obesity-associated chronic liver disease that can…

Breast cancer screening saves lives, says study??? that screening only narrowly decreased risks that a 50-year-old woman would die from breast cancer within 10 years — from 0.53 percent to 0.46 percent.

Engineering Evil Note: There seems to be conflicting studies being utilized to favor screening. I found this report stating that they used no current data for the meta analysis. The data they claimed to have used here was over 20 years old. I am withholding my humble opinion to see if there were current studies, and if…

Chemotherapys False Expectations : 69 percent of patients with advanced lung cancer and 81 percent of patients with advanced colorectal cancer did not understand that the chemotherapy they were receiving was not at all likely to cure their disease

Advanced Cancer Patients Overoptimistic About Chemotherapy’s Ability to Cure, Study Finds ScienceDaily (Oct. 24, 2012) — Findings from a nationwide study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute suggest that patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer are frequently mistaken in their beliefs that chemotherapy can cure their disease. The study, published in the Oct.…

Questions of ethics and quality cloud globalization of clinical trials: Same drug in different populations could produce markedly different results

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Michelle Gailiun michelle.gailiun@duke.edu 919-724-5343 Duke University Medical Center DURHAM, N.C. – Top-tier U.S.-based pharmaceutical companies are moving their clinical trials overseas at warp speed, raising questions about ethics, quality control, and even the scientific value of their findings for people back in the U.S. Many of the trials are…

HALT-C researchers: Interferon as long-term treatment for hepatitis C not effective

2008 study posted for filing Contact: LaKisha Ladson lakisha.ladson@utsouthwestern.edu 214-648-3404 UT Southwestern Medical Center IMAGE:Dr. William M. Lee and other researchers have discovered in a multicenter study that using the drug interferon as a long-term maintenance strategy to slow the progression of liver disease… Click here for more information.  DALLAS – Dec. 4, 2008 –…

Regular consumption of sugary beverages linked to increased genetic risk of obesity

Contact: Todd Datz tdatz@hsph.harvard.edu 617-432-8413 Harvard School of Public Health   Researchers from Harvard School of Public Health have found that greater consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) is linked with a greater genetic susceptibility to high body mass index (BMI) and increased risk of obesity. The study reinforces the view that environmental and genetic factors…

Drug companies do almost no innovation : Innovation comes mainly from NIH-supported research in academic medical centers

Re-Posted for Filing 2008 report New report: The truth about drug innovation   New York, NY: A new report co-authored by Manhattan Institute senior fellow Benjamin Zycher, and Joseph DiMasi, and Christopher-Paul Milne, researchers from the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development, examines case histories for thirty-five important pharmaceutical innovations. Skeptics of the…

Protection from Pertussis Vaccine, after the fifth dose wanes more than 40 percent each year

Protection Against Whooping Cough Waned During the Five Years After Fifth Dose of DTaP ScienceDaily (Sep. 12, 2012) — Protection against whooping cough (also called pertussis) waned during the five years after the fifth dose of the combined diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, according to researchers from the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center. The…

Stanford researcher criticizes FDA plans to reduce oversight of off-label drug use: Pharmaceutial Free For All (No Rules)

Repost From April 2008 Contact: Rosanne Spector manishma@stanford.edu 650-725-5374 Stanford University Medical Center STANFORD, Calif. – Proposed guidelines from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration would allow companies to market more drugs for unapproved uses and are a step in the wrong direction, said a researcher from the Stanford University School of Medicine. In an…