Research Paves Way for Development of Cyborg Moth ‘Biobots’

Matt Shipman | News Services | 919.515.6386 Dr. Alper Bozkurt | 919.515.7349 Release Date: 08.20.14 North Carolina State University researchers have developed methods for electronically manipulating the flight muscles of moths and for monitoring the electrical signals moths use to control those muscles. The work opens the door to the development of remotely-controlled moths, or…

US lead in science and technology shrinking

– U.S. and Europe has decreased, respectively, from 37 percent to 30 percent and from 26 percent to 22 percent. Press Release 14-022  Emerging economies shifting global S&T landscape Indicators is a widely-used resource, reporting on R&D trends, the STEM workforce, and more. Credit and Larger Version February 6, 2014 The United States’ (U.S.) predominance in…

Geoengineering the climate could reduce vital rains

  October 31, 2013 BOULDER—Although a significant build-up in greenhouse gases in the atmosphere would alter worldwide precipitation patterns, a widely discussed technological approach to reduce future global warming would also interfere with rainfall and snowfall, new research shows.   The international study, led by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), finds…

Study Shows Reproductive Effects of Pesticide Exposure Span Generations

For Immediate Release Matt Shipman | News Services | 919.515.6386 Dr. Gerald LeBlanc | 919.515.7404 Release Date: 04.22.2013 Filed under Releases North Carolina State University researchers studying aquatic organisms called Daphnia have found that exposure to a chemical pesticide has impacts that span multiple generations – causing the so-called “water fleas” to produce more male…

Egypt riot police deploy after palace clashes

02                 Feb                 2013 CAIRO (AFP) Egyptian riot police deployed on Saturday near President Mohamed Morsi’s palace as his administration rushed to contain fallout from footage of police beating a naked man during the deadly overnight clashes. In Cairo’s Tahrir Square, protesters stoned Prime Minister Hisham Qandil’s motorcade when the premier tried to visit after separate…

Study finds significant microorganism populations in middle and upper troposphere

Contact: John Toon jtoon@gatech.edu 404-894-6986 Georgia Institute of Technology Bugs in the Atmosphere In what is believed to be the first study of its kind, researchers used genomic techniques to document the presence of significant numbers of living microorganisms – principally bacteria – in the middle and upper troposphere, that section of the atmosphere approximately…

These Mini-Bots Were Made for Walking: Cells Power Biological Machines: non-electronic biological machines

Miniature “bio-bots” developed at the University of Illinois are made of hydrogel and heart cells, but can walk on their own. (Credit: Elise A. Corbin) ScienceDaily (Nov. 15, 2012) — They’re soft, biocompatible, about 7 millimeters long — and, incredibly, able to walk by themselves. Miniature “bio-bots” developed at the University of Illinois are making…

Understanding the brain by controlling behavior

Contact: Peter Reuell preuell@fas.harvard.edu 617-496-8070 Harvard University Using precisely-targeted lasers, researchers manipulate neurons in worms’ brains and take control of their behavior In the quest to understand how the brain turns sensory input into behavior, Harvard scientists have crossed a major threshold. Using precisely-targeted lasers, researchers have been able to take over an animal’s brain,…

‘They’re selling time bombs’: Scientists reveal how baths sends users crazy with ingredient ingredient that is ten times stronger than cocaine

By Daily Mail Reporter PUBLISHED:10:35 EST, 23 September 2012| UPDATED:11:26 EST, 23 September 2012   As lethal bath salts continue to take young lives, researchers have discovered the shocking strength of a key ingredient that leaves users struggling with the after effects for days. MDPV, commonly found in the street drug is ten times stronger…

Sifting Social Media for Early Signs of Adverse Drug Reactions

ScienceDaily (Sep. 21, 2012) — The National Science Foundation has awarded a $130,000 grant to a team co-led by University of Virginia professor Ahmed Abbasi to fund research that will analyze social media, including tweets and online discussion forums, to identify adverse drug reactions — a process that promises to be much faster and perhaps…

While chaos drives some to seek comfort in friends and family, Many Wealthy gravitate toward money and material possessions

By Yasmin Anwar, Media Relations | August 30, 2012 BERKELEY —Crises are said to bring people closer together. But a new study from UC Berkeley suggests that while the have-nots reach out to one another in times of trouble, the wealthy are more apt to find comfort in material possessions. While chaos drives some to…