Several FDA-approved anti-cancer drugs induce stem cell tumors, perhaps thwarting therapy

Drosophila intestines provide ‘ready-made stem cell microenvironments’ that are ‘difficult-to-impossible’ to create in petri dishes, offering an unconventional screen that allows researchers to test drugs in vivo. Credit: University of Massachusetts Amherst                                          Using a new approach to systematically test chemotherapy drugs in an unusual animal model, a research team led by University of…

NLST data highlight probability of lung cancer overdiagnosis / overdiagnosis rate for bronchioloalveolar lung cancer was 78.9 percent

Contact: Shawn Farley PR@acr.org 703-648-8936 American College of Radiology NLST data highlight probability of lung cancer overdiagnosis with low-dose CT screening Philadelphia, PA—Data from the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST)—conducted by the American College of Radiology Imaging Network and National Cancer Institute Lung Screening Study—provided researchers the opportunity to investigate the probability that a…

LSUHSC research finds combo of plant nutrients killed 100% of sample breast cancer cells

Contact: Leslie Capo lcapo@lsuhsc.edu 504-568-4806 Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans, LA – A study led by Madhwa Raj, PhD, Research Professor in Obstetrics and Gynecology at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans and its Stanley S. Scott Cancer Center, has found that a super cocktail of six natural compounds in vegetables, fruits,…

Compound derived from vegetables shields rodents from lethal radiation doses

Contact: Karen Mallet km463@georgetown.edu Georgetown University Medical Center WASHINGTON — Georgetown University Medical Center researchers say a compound derived from cruciferous vegetable such as cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli protected rats and mice from lethal doses of radiation. Their study, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests the compound, already…

New theory uncovers cancer’s deep evolutionary roots / Cancer is realated to embryo development

Contact: Skip Derra skip.derra@asu.edu 480-965-4823 Arizona State University   Tracing cancer back to the dawn of multicellularity could explain its mysterious properties and transform therapy TEMPE, Ariz. — A new way to look at cancer — by tracing its deep evolutionary roots to the dawn of multicellularity more than a billion years ago — has…

Reducing unnecessary and high-dose pediatric CT scans could cut associated cancers by 62 percent

Contact: Phyllis Brown phyllis.brown@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu 916-734-9023 University of California – Davis Health System (SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — A study examining trends in X-ray computed tomography (CT) use in children in the United States has found that reducing unnecessary scans and lowering the doses for the highest-dose scans could lower the overall lifetime risk of future imaging-related cancers…

Omega-3 fatty acids more effective at inhibiting growth of triple-negative breast cancer

Contact: Diana Quattrone diana.quattrone@fccc.edu 215-728-7784 Fox Chase Cancer Center     WASHINGTON, DC (April 9, 2013)—Researchers from Fox Chase Cancer Center have found that omega-3 fatty acids and their metabolite products slow or stop the proliferation, or growth in the number of cells, of triple-negative breast cancer cells more effectively than cells from luminal types…

Cancer vaccines self-sabotage, channel immune attack to injection site

  UT MD Anderson scientists find common vaccine ingredient diverts T cells from tumors HOUSTON – Cancer vaccines that attempt to stimulate an immune system assault fail because the killer T cells aimed at tumors instead find the vaccination site a more inviting target, scientists at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report…

Mushroom-supplemented soybean extract shows therapeutic promise for advanced prostate cancer

February 20, 2013 (SACRAMENTO, Calif.) — A natural, nontoxic product called genistein-combined polysaccharide, or GCP, which is commercially available in health stores, could help lengthen the life expectancy of certain prostate cancer patients, UC Davis researchers have found. Paramita Ghosh Men with prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, known as…

Some men voice complaints of shortened penis following prostate cancer treatment

Contact: Teresa Herbert teresa_herbert@dfci.harvard.edu 617-632-4090 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Perceived reduction in penis size linked to regrets of treatment choice BOSTON – A small percentage of men in a prostate cancer study complained that their penis seemed shorter following treatment, with some saying that it interfered with intimate relationships and caused them to regret the type…

Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria associated with Burkitt Lymphoma and Epstein Barr Virus

12-11-2012 WASHINGTON (Dec. 11, 2012) – New research, presented this morning at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), has identified important associations between Plasmodium falciparum  (Pf) malaria and endemic Burkitt Lymphoma (eBL) that may help researchers identify young children who are more susceptible to eBL. Unlike previous studies in which…

87th Health Research Report 19 AUG 2010 – Reconstruction

Health Research Report 87th Issue 19 AUG 2010 Compiled By Ralph Turchiano http://www.vit.bz http://www.youtube.com/vhfilm  http://www.facebook.com/engineeringevil http://www.engineeringevil.com   http://www.healthresearchreport.me  Editors Top Five:   SCIENTISTS TARGET POSSIBLE CAUSE OF ONE FORM OF BOWEL DISEASE Pancreatic cancers use fructose, common in the Western diet, to fuel their growth Acetaminophen tied to childhood wheezing and allergies FDA moves to withdraw unproven…

Green tea extract appears to keep cancer in check in majority of CLL patients

2010 study posted for filing Contact: Karl Oestreich newsbureau@mayo.edu 507-284-5005 Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic has conducted the first clinical studies of tea extract in cancer patients CHICAGO — ASCO Abstract Number: 6522 (http://abstract.asco.org/AbstView_74_47574.html). An extract of green tea appears to have clinical activity with low toxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who used it…