Analyst: Stealth Technology Seizure Behind MH370 Disappearance

EEV: ? Not as concerned of the conspiracy of a hijacking, but as to the passenger list

INDONESIA, AT SEA: A personnel of Indonesia's National Search and Rescue looks over horizon during a search in the Andaman sea area around northern tip of Indonesia's Sumatra island for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 on March 17, 2014. The last words spoken from the cockpit of the Malaysian passenger jet that went missing 10 days ago were believed to have been spoken by the co-pilot, the airline's top executive said Monday.

 

INDONESIA, AT SEA: A personnel of Indonesia’s National Search and Rescue looks over horizon during a search in the Andaman sea area around northern tip of Indonesia’s Sumatra island for the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 on March 17, 2014. The last words spoken from the cockpit of the Malaysian passenger jet that went missing 10 days ago were believed to have been spoken by the co-pilot, the airline’s top executive said Monday.

Photo credit: © AFP PHOTO/Chaideer Mahyuddin

By Kells Hetherington

WASHINGTON (VR) — Malaysian Airlines flight 370 was deliberately targeted for hijacking, according to Captain Field McConnell, a retired Delta Airlines pilot and a retired United States Air Force F4 and F16 fighter pilot.

Capt. McConnell cites industrial espionage for a cutting edge military technology as the reason behind the airliner’s disappearance. “There were 20 Chinese software engineers in the aircraft, riding as passengers, and they were working for Freescale Technology in Austin, Texas, and they had the intellectual property of an open patent. In other word[s], a patent had been applied for, but yet — not yet granted. And the ownership of that patent was 20%, 20%, 20%, 20% and 20% for the U.S. Corporation named Freescale. And until that patent is granted, there is no ownership,” McConnell said. Continue reading “Analyst: Stealth Technology Seizure Behind MH370 Disappearance”

Malaysian Airline passengers’ phones still ringing?

MH 777
MH 777 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Tuesday, 11 March 2014

The ‘unprecedented mystery’ behind the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines flight MH 370 deepened on Monday when relatives claimed they were able to call the cellphones of their missing loved ones.

According to the Washington Post, family of some of the 239 people on board the vanished Boeing 777 said that they were getting ring tones and could see them as online through a Chinese social networking service called QQ.

One man said that the QQ account of his brother-in-law showed him as active, but frustratingly for those waiting desperately for any news, messages sent have gone unanswered and the calls have not been picked up.

Indeed, the phantom phone calls and online presence set off a whole new level of hysteria for relatives who have spent the past three-days cooped-up in a Beijing hotel waiting for some concrete information on the missing plane. Continue reading “Malaysian Airline passengers’ phones still ringing?”