Indian plant could play key role in death of cancer cells

Contact: Danielle Moores dwongmoores@yahoo.com 706-496-5956 Georgia Health Sciences University AUGUSTA, Ga. – Scientists at the Georgia Regents University Cancer Center have identified an Indian plant, used for centuries to treat inflammation, fever and malaria, that could help kill cancer cells. Cancer cells typically avoid death by hijacking molecular chaperones that guide and protect the proteins…

Green tea and red wine extracts interrupt Alzheimer’s disease pathway in cells

Contact: Chris Bunting c.j.bunting@leeds.ac.uk 44-113-343-2049 University of Leeds Natural chemicals found in green tea and red wine may disrupt a key step of the Alzheimer’s disease pathway, according to new research from the University of Leeds. In early-stage laboratory experiments, the researchers identified the process which allows harmful clumps of protein to latch on to…

Medicinal toothbrush tree yields antibiotic to treat TB in new way

Contact: Tony Maxwell zoe.dunford@nbi.ac.uk 44-160-345-0771 Norwich BioScience Institutes A compound from the South African toothbrush tree inactivates a drug target for tuberculosis in a previously unseen way. Tuberculosis causes more deaths worldwide than any other bacterial disease. At the same time as rates are increasing, resistance strains are emerging due, in part, to non-compliance with…

Carnitine supplements reverse glucose intolerance in animals

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Mary Jane Gore mary.gore@duke.edu 919-660-1309 Duke University Medical Center DURHAM, N.C. – Supplementing obese rats with the nutrient carnitine helps the animals to clear the extra sugar in their blood, something they had trouble doing on their own, researchers at Duke University Medical Center report. A team led by…

Selenium may slow march of AIDS

2008 study posted for filing Contact: Amitabh Avasthi axa47@psu.edu 814-865-9481 Penn State Increasing the production of naturally occurring proteins that contain selenium in human blood cells slows down multiplication of the AIDS virus, according to biochemists. “We have found that increasing the expression of proteins that contain selenium negatively affects the replication of HIV,” said…

Scientists discover one of the ways the influenza virus disarms host cells

Contact: Megan Fellman fellman@northwestern.edu 847-491-3115 Northwestern University Advantage flu virus When you are hit with the flu, you know it immediately — fever, chills, sore throat, aching muscles, fatigue. This is your body mounting an immune response to the invading virus. But less is known about what is happening on the molecular level. Now Northwestern…

Turmeric Spices Up Virus Study – it shows promise in fighting devastating viruses

Posted: August 15, 2012 at 10:47 am, Last Updated: August 15, 2012 at 1:33 pm By Michele McDonald Aarthi Narayanan. Photo by Evan Cantwell The popular spice turmeric packs more than just flavor — , Mason researchers recently discovered. Curcumin, found in turmeric, stopped the potentially deadly Rift Valley Fever virus from multiplying in infected…

Glucosamine-like supplement suppresses multiple sclerosis attacks

Contact: Tom Vasich tmvasich@uci.edu 949-824-6455 University of California – Irvine UCI study shows promise of metabolic therapy for autoimmune diseases Irvine, Calif., Sept. 30, 2011 — A glucosamine-like dietary supplement suppresses the damaging autoimmune response seen in multiple sclerosis, according to a UC Irvine study. UCI’s Dr. Michael Demetriou, Ani Grigorian and others found that…