Acid levels in the diet could have profound effects on kidney health

Contact: Kurtis Pivert kpivert@asn-online.org 202-699-0238 American Society of Nephrology Atlanta, GA (November 9, 2013)—Three new studies suggest that controlling dietary acid intake could help improve kidney health. Results of these studies will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2013 November 5-10 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA. A diet rich in wheat…

There’s life after radiation for brain cells

Contact: Stephanie Desmon sdesmon1@jhmi.edu 410-955-8665 Johns Hopkins Medicine Johns Hopkins researchers suggest neural stem cells may regenerate after anti-cancer treatment Scientists have long believed that healthy brain cells, once damaged by radiation designed to kill brain tumors, cannot regenerate. But new Johns Hopkins research in mice suggests that neural stem cells, the body’s source of…

155th Health Research Report Synopsis 17 MAY 2013

155th Health Research Report Synopsis 17 MAY 2013   1. Vitamin C may head off lung problems in babies born to pregnant smokers 2. Magnesium may be as important to kids’ bone health as calcium 3. Preterm infants may need 800 IU of vitamin D3 per day 4. Parents who suck on their infants’ pacifiers…

Restless legs syndrome, insomnia and brain chemistry: A tangled mystery solved? (Excessive Glutamate)

Contact: Stephanie Desmon sdesmon1@jhmi.edu 410-955-8665 Johns Hopkins Medicine Johns Hopkins researchers believe they may have discovered an explanation for the sleepless nights associated with restless legs syndrome (RLS), a symptom that persists even when the disruptive, overwhelming nocturnal urge to move the legs is treated successfully with medication. Neurologists have long believed RLS is related…

Johns Hopkins study: Risk of pancreatitis doubles for those taking new class of diabetes drugs

Contact: Stephanie Desmon sdesmon1@jhmi.edu 410-955-8665 Johns Hopkins Medicine People who take the newest class of diabetes drugs to control blood sugar are twice as likely as those on other forms of sugar-control medication to be hospitalized with pancreatitis, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In an article published online in JAMA Internal Medicine, the scientists say the…

Popular HIV drug commonly prescribed anti-retroviral drug efavirenz attacks brain cells

Contact: Stephanie Desmon sdesmon1@jhmi.edu 410-955-8665 Johns Hopkins Medicine Popular HIV drug may cause memory declines Johns Hopkins study suggests the commonly prescribed anti-retroviral drug efavirenz attacks brain cells The way the body metabolizes a commonly prescribed anti-retroviral drug that is used long term by patients infected with HIV may contribute to cognitive impairment by damaging…

Sulforaphane, which occurs naturally in broccoli restores certain functions in COPD

2008 Post for filing Contact: Keely Savoie ksavoie@thoracic.org 212-315-8620 American Thoracic Society COPD?  Eat your veggies You know it’s good for you in other ways, but could eating your broccoli also help patients with chronic lung disease? It just might. According to recent research from Johns Hopkins Medical School, a decrease in lung concentrations of…

Having a tonsillectomy can cause Obesity

Contact: David March dmarch1@jhmi.edu 410-955-1534 Johns Hopkins Medicine Age, not underlying diagnosis, key factor in weight gain in children after tonsillectomy Potentially worrisome weight gains following tonsillectomy occur mostly in children under the age of 6, not in older children, a study by Johns Hopkins experts in otolaryngology- head and neck surgery shows. Sudden increases…

Johns Hopkins team finds ICU misdiagnoses may account for as many annual deaths as breast cancer

Armstrong Institute researchers discover missed medical conditions in more than 1 in 4 critically ill adults Each year as many as 40,500 critically ill U.S. hospital patients die with an unknown medical condition that may have caused or contributed to their death, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts report in a recent study. In a discussion…

Researchers Discover Why Steroid Treatment for COPD Is Ineffective

  Findings Offer Potential New Drug Target for COPD Therapy Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) leads to persistent inflammation of the airways and is typically managed with corticosteroids, a class of anti-inflammatory medication. However, corticosteroids do not improve survival nor alter the progression of COPD and may reduce lung symptoms as little as 20 percent.…