Lifespan greatly enhanced with Synbiotics

Lifespan greatly enhanced with Synbiotics

Lifespan greatly enhanced with Synbiotics

Scientists fed fruit flies with a combination of probiotics and an herbal supplement called Triphala that was able to prolong the flies’ longevity by 60 % and protect them against chronic diseases associated with aging.

Susan Westfall, Nikita Lomis, Satya Prakash. Longevity extension in Drosophila through gut-brain communication. Scientific Reports, 2018; 8 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-25382-z

Study: Probiotics reduce stress-induced intestinal flare-ups

Contact: Shantell M. Kirkendoll smkirk@umich.edu 734-764-2220 University of Michigan Health System

University of Michigan study helps explain benefits of probiotics for patients with stress-associated gastrointestinal disorders

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – For those with irritable bowel syndrome who wonder if stress aggravates their intestinal disorder, a new University of Michigan Health System study shows it’s not all in their head.

Researchers revealed that while stress does not cause IBS, it does alter brain-gut interactions and induces the intestinal inflammation that often leads to severe or chronic belly pain, loss of appetite and diarrhea.

Stress has a way of suppressing an important component called an inflammasome which is needed to maintain normal gut microbiota, but probiotics reversed the effect in animal models, according to findings published online ahead of print in Gastroenterology.

“The effect of stress could be protected with probiotics which reversed the inhibition of the inflammasome,” says senior study author and gastroenterologist John Y. Kao, M.D., associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan. “This study reveals an important mechanism for explaining why treating IBS patients with probiotics makes sense.”

Probiotics are live bacteria that help grow the gut-dwelling “good” bacteria that keep pathogens in check, aid digestion and nutrient absorption and contribute to immune function.

U-M researchers including Chung Owyang, M.D., chief of the U-M Division of Gastroenterology, Gary Huffnagle, Ph.D., professor of pulmonary and critical care, and infectious disease expert Vincent Young, M.D., Ph.D., were able to identify the way stress significantly altered the composition of gut bacteria and the role of probiotics.

Maintaining healthy microbiota requires action by nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein-like receptors, pyrin-domain containing (NLRP)-6 inflammasomes.  But when stressed, mice produced corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) that prevented inflammasomes from doing their job.

Inhibiting inflammosomes alters the composition of the gut, leading to intestinal inflammation. In the study, pretreatment with probiotic therapy reduced inflammation in mice with stress-induced small bowel inflammation.

“Additional clinical study is required to determine the optimal probiotic therapy,” says Kao. “Patients can start living healthier lifestyles to improve their gut microbiota such as adding more fruits and vegetables to their diet, and looking for ways to keep stress in check.”

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Reference: “Stress-induced corticotropin-releasing hormone-mediated NLRPG inflammasome inhibition and transmissible enteritis in mice, Gastroenterology, doi: 10.1053

Funding:  National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Oxidized form of Vitamin A, may bring relief for ulcerative colitis

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: Cody Mooneyhan
cmooneyhan@faseb.org
301-634-7104
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology finds retinoic acid may alleviate ulcerative colitis and similar irritable bowel diseases

Here’s another reason why you should take your vitamins. A new research report appearing in the October 2009 print issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology (http://www.jleukbio.org) suggests that retinoic acid, the oxidized form of vitamin A, could be a beneficial treatment for people suffering from ulcerative colitis and other irritable bowel diseases. Specifically they found that retinoic acid helps suppress out-of-control inflammation, which is a hallmark of active ulcerative colitis.

“Pharmaceutical strategies based on this research may offer a promising alternative to our current approaches of managing immune diseases including, IBD, arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and so on,” Aiping Bai, a researcher involved in the work from Nanchang University in Nanchang City, China.

To make this discovery, Bai and colleagues conducted in vitro studies with human tissue and in vivo studies in mice. Both studies ultimately found that treatment with retinoic acid reduced the inflammation in the colon by increasing the expression of FOXP3, a gene involved with immune system responses, as well as decreasing the expression of IL-17, a cytokine believed to cause inflammation. Because many experts believe that IL-17 directly relates to the uncontrolled inflammation seen in ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel disease, the discovery that retinoic acid reduces IL-17’s ability to cause inflammation could accelerate the development of treatments for these chronic diseases.

“Runaway inflammation is serious problem, no matter where it occurs in the body, but in many instances, the root cause is a mystery,” said John Wherry, Ph.D., Deputy Editor of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. “This research helps scientists better understand what causes and controls inflammation in the colon, which in turn, helps lay the groundwork for new classes of drugs to treat this devastating condition.”

 

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The Journal of Leukocyte Biology (http://www.jleukbio.org) publishes peer-reviewed manuscripts on original investigations focusing on the cellular and molecular biology of leukocytes and on the origins, the developmental biology, biochemistry and functions of granulocytes, lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes and other cells involved in host defense and inflammation. The Journal of Leukocyte Biology is published by the Society for Leukocyte Biology.

Details: Aiping Bai, Nonghua Lu, Yuan Guo, Zhanju Liu, Jiang Chen, and Zhikang Peng. All-trans retinoic acid down-regulates inflammatory responses by shifting the Treg/Th17 profile in human ulcerative and murine colitis. J Leukoc Biol 2009 86: 959� doi: doi:10.1189/jlb.0109006 ; http://www.jleukbio.org/cgi/content/abstract/86/4/959

44th Health Research Report 25 NOV 2008 – Reconstruction

 

Editors Top Five:

1. What cures you may also ail you: Antibiotics, your gut and you

2. Roche ordered to pay $13M to users of acne drug

3. Potassium loss from blood pressure drugs may explain higher risk of adult diabetes

4. 14 drugs identified as most urgently needing study for off-label use, Stanford professor says

5. Pregnancy study finds strong association between two antidepressants and heart anomalies

In this issue:

1. Many doctors plan to quit or cut back: survey

2. Obese kids’ artery plaque similar to middle-aged adults

3. Evolution’s new wrinkle: Proteins with cruise control provide new perspective

4. Mandatory HPV Vaccination Is Unwarranted and Unwise

5. Plastic surgeons warn of malnutrition in body contouring patients

6. Soluble fiber, antispasmodics and peppermint oil should be used to treat IBS

7. Arsenic linked to cardiovascular disease at EPA-regulated drinking water standards

8. Calcium may only protect against colorectal cancer in presence of magnesium

9. Study helps clarify role of vitamin D in cancer therapy

10. What cures you may also ail you: Antibiotics, your gut and you

11. Indigo ointment may help treat patients with psoriasis

12. Broccoli may lower lung cancer risk in smokers

13. Exercise increases brain growth factor and receptors, prevents stem cell drop in middle age

14. Garlic chemical tablet treats diabetes I and II

15. Fake TV News: Widespread and Undisclosed

16. Red, red wine: How it fights Alzheimer’s

17. Roche ordered to pay $13M to users of acne drug

18. Melatonin may save eyesight in inflammatory disease

19. 14 drugs identified as most urgently needing study for off-label use, Stanford professor says

20. Stomach ulcer bug causes bad breath

21. Mineral oil contamination in humans: A health problem?

22. Pregnancy study finds strong association between two antidepressants and heart anomalies

23. Potassium loss from blood pressure drugs may explain higher risk of adult diabetes

24. Feed a cold, feed a fever: Research shows calorie cut makes it harder to fight flu

25. Pain is in the eyes of the beholder

26. Estrogen therapy could be dangerous for women with existing heart risk

Health Technology Research Synopsis

44th Health Research Report 25 NOV 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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41st Health Research Report 14 SEP 2008 – Recontsruction

 

Editors Top Five:

 

1. St. John’s wort relieves symptoms of major depression

2. New Study on Effects of Disclosing Financial Interests on Participation in Medical Research

3. Flu vaccine not associated with reduced hospitalizations or outpatient visits among young children

4. Research shows link between bisphenol A and disease in adults

5. Scientists develop new cancer-killing compound from salad plant

 

 

In this issue:

 

1. News media often do not report potential sources of bias in medical research

2. Danish study provides new information on hormone replacement therapy and the risk of heart attacks

3. During exercise, the human brain shifts into high gear on ‘alternative energy’

4. Too many calories send the brain off kilter

5. Second lumpectomy for breast cancer reduces survival rates

6. DNA of good bacteria drives intestinal response to infection

7. New Study on Effects of Disclosing Financial Interests on Participation in Medical Research

8. Disinfectants can make bacteria resistant to treatment

9. Flu vaccine not associated with reduced hospitalizations or outpatient visits among young children

10. Vitamin D deficiency common in patients with IBD, chronic liver disease

11. New studies examine the effectiveness of probiotics in IBS

12. Oral vitamin D may help prevent some skin infections

13. Olive oil ingredient ups the time between meals

14. Red wine may lower lung cancer risk

15. Honey helps to heal wounds

16. Herbal Menopause Therapy a Good Fit for Breast Cancer Patients?

17. Bisphenol A linked to chemotherapy resistance

18. St. John’s wort relieves symptoms of major depression

19. Mouse studies suggest daily dose of ginkgo may prevent brain cell damage after a stroke

20. Children with cystic fibrosis not well covered by guidelines for vitamin D needs

21. Vitamin D a key player in overall health of several body organs, says UC Riverside biochemist

22. Research shows link between bisphenol A and disease in adults

23. Pectin power

24. First evidence that a common pollutant may reduce iodine levels in breast milk

25. Vitamin K does not stem BMD decline in postmenopausal women with osteopenia ((((READ ARTICLE)))

26. Scientists develop new cancer-killing compound from salad plant

27. More Americans have, get treated for high blood pressure

28. Resveratrol prevents fat accumulation in livers of ‘alcoholic’ mice

Health Technology Research Synopsis

41st Issue Date 14 SEP 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

 

39th Health Research Report 16 SEP 2008 – Reconstruction

Editors Top Five:

1. Substance found in fruits and vegetables reduces likelihood of the flu

2. New study will make criminals sweat

3. Common bronchodilator linked to increased deaths

4. Higher urinary levels of commonly used chemical, BPA, linked with cardiovascular disease, diabetes

5. FDA defends plastic linked with health risks

In this issue:

1. Loss of sleep, even for a single night, increases inflammation in the body

2. Study finds B-vitamin deficiency may cause vascular cognitive impairment

3. Innate immune system targets asthma-linked fungus for destruction

4. New study reveals higher protein breakfast may help dieters stay on track

5. Substance found in fruits and vegetables reduces likelihood of the flu

6. Oxidative Stress: Mechanism of Cell Death Clarified

7. Study shows pine bark naturally reduces knee osteoarthritis

8. Vitamin B12 may protect the brain in old age

9. Fluctuations in serotonin transport may explain winter blues

10. Diet may eliminate spasms for infants with epilepsy

11. Calcium during pregnancy reduces harmful blood lead levels

12. Eating fish while pregnant, longer breastfeeding, lead to better infant development

13. Is yakult helpful in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome?

14. New research could hold the key to keeping older people fit for longer

15. COPD? Eat your veggies

16. Drinking chamomile tea may help fight complications of diabetes

17. Study highlights underlying reasons for why patients are missing their supplementation

18. New study will make criminals sweat

19. Avoid coupon redeemers: Their stigma is contagious (unless they’re attractive)

20. Is re-emerging superbug the next MRSA?

21. Common bronchodilator linked to increased deaths

22. Higher urinary levels of commonly used chemical, BPA, linked with cardiovascular disease, diabetes

23. Expert urges FDA to take action to reduce BPA exposure

24. FDA defends plastic linked with health risks

Health Technology Research Synopsis

39th Issue Date 16 SEP 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.engineeringevil.com

36th Health Research Report 05 AUG 2008 – Reconstruction

 

Editors Top Five:

 
1.      Toxic drugs, toxic system: Sociologist predicts drug disasters
2.      Study Suggests 86 Percent of Americans Could be Overweight or Obese by 2030
3.      Flu vaccine may not protect seniors well
4.      Chronic exposure to estrogen impairs some cognitive functions
5.      Vitamin C injections slow tumor growth in mice

 

 

In this issue:
1.      Is sun exposure a major cause of melanoma?
2.      Soy foods are associated with lower sperm concentrations
3.      Toxic chemicals found in common scented laundry products, air fresheners
4.      Exercise could be the heart’s fountain of youth
5.      Gummy bears that fight plaque
6.      Japanese diet rich in fish may hold secret to healthy heart
7.      At-Home Deaths from Combining Rx Drugs, Street Drugs and/or Alcohol Skyrocket By More Than 3,000 Percent
8.      Dietary factors appear to be associated with diabetes risk
9.      Foods high in conjugated linoleic acids can enrich breast milk
10.  OSU STUDY SHOWS EXPOSURE TO BAD AIR RAISES BLOOD PRESSURE
11.  Compound that helps rice grow reduces nerve, vascular damage from diabetes
12.  Study Suggests 86 Percent of Americans Could be Overweight or Obese by 2030
13.  Hey fever! The surprise benefit of allergies
14.  Frankincense provides relief to arthritis sufferers
15.  Cholesterol-lowering drug boosts bone repair
16.  Experts continue to cite Bifantis as promising probiotic treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome
17.  Exercise in a pill
18.  Flu vaccine may not protect seniors well
19.  New Study Shows Compounds From Soy Affect Brain and Reproductive Development
20.  Physicians ask EPA, ‘Antibiotics to cure sick apples, or sick children?’
21.  Schizophrenia researchers welcome new blood
22.  Outdoor Activity and Nearsightedness in Children
23.  Chronic exposure to estrogen impairs some cognitive functions
24.  Toxic drugs, toxic system: Sociologist predicts drug disasters
25.  Task Force Finds No Prostate Screening Benefit for Men Over 75
26.  Eating fish may prevent memory loss and stroke in old age
27.  Canadian study of colds and kids: Positive safety results for ginseng extract
28.  Vitamin C injections slow tumor growth in mice
29.  Adults who eat eggs for breakfast lose 65 percent more weight
30.  Sesame seed extract and konjac gum may help ward off Salmonella and E. coli
31.  In era of pills, fewer shrinks doing talk therapy
 

Health Technology Research Synopsis

36th Issue Date 05 AUG 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com