Personal care products are possible sources of potentially harmful parabens for babies

Contact: Michael Bernstein m_bernstein@acs.org 202-872-6042 American Chemical Society Through lotions, shampoos and other personal care products (PCPs), infants and toddlers are likely becoming exposed to potentially harmful substances, called parabens, at an even higher level than adult women in the U.S., researchers have reported. They published their findings on parabens, which have been linked to…

New study: Many flame retardants in house dust — unsafe levels: study finds chemicals linked to cancer, learning problems, hormone disruption

Contact: Kathryn Rodgers rodgers@silentspring.org 617-332-4288 x225 Silent Spring Institute Peer-reviewed study finds chemicals linked to cancer, learning problems, hormone disruption A peer-reviewed study of the largest number of flame retardants ever tested in homes found that most houses had levels of at least one flame retardant that exceeded a federal health guideline. The journal Environmental…

Bird flu virus remains infectious up to 600 days in municipal landfills H5N1

2009 study posted for filing   Environmental Science & Technology   Amid concerns about a pandemic of swine flu, researchers from Nebraska report for the first time that poultry carcasses infected with another threat — the “bird flu” virus — can remain infectious in municipal landfills for almost 2 years. Their report is scheduled for…

Prions are not degraded by conventional sewage treatment processes

Re-Posted  for filing 2008 Contact: Michael Woods m_woods@acs.org 202-872-4400 American Chemical Society Persistence of Pathogenic Prion Protein during Simulated Wastewater Treatment Processes IMAGE:Wastewater treatment plants do not reduce harmful proteins called prions that cause incurable brain infections, such as Mad Cow disease, scientists report. Click here for more information.    Environmental Science & Technology Scientists…

New analysis of drinking water-related gastrointestinal illness: May Cause up to cause of up to 1.1 million annual cases of acute gastrointestinal illness

Contact: Michael Bernstein m_bernstein@acs.org 202-872-6042 American Chemical Society The distribution system piping in U.S. public water systems that rely on non-disinfected well water or “ground water” may be a largely unrecognized cause of up to 1.1 million annual cases of acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI), involving nausea, vomiting and diarrhea, scientists are reporting. Their study in…

New study links fate of personal care products to environmental pollution and human health concerns: Triclosan

Contact: Joe Caspermeyer joseph.caspermeyer@asu.edu 480-727-0369 Arizona State University Parental concerns in maintaining germ-free homes for their children have led to an ever-increasing demand and the rapid adoption of anti-bacterial soaps and cleaning agents. But the active ingredients of those antiseptic soaps now have come under scrutiny by the EPA and FDA, due to both environmental…

Concern about plans to close unique Canadian environmental project

Contact: Michael Bernstein m_bernstein@acs.org 202-872-6042 American Chemical Society The Canadian government’s plans to discontinue in 2013 a unique environmental research project that has yielded insights into water pollution, climate change and other topics for almost 40 years would be a “huge loss not only to science but to the scientific heritage of humanity.” That’s the…

Study finds increasing atmospheric concentrations of new flame retardants

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Compounds used in new flame-retardant products are showing up in the environment at increasing concentrations, according to a recent study by researchers at Indiana University Bloomington. The study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, reports on concentrations of two compounds measured in atmospheric samples collected in the Great Lakes region…

First link between potentially toxic PFCs in office air and in office workers’ blood

In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists are reporting that the indoor air in offices is an important source of worker exposure to potentially toxic substances released by carpeting, furniture, paint and other items. Their report, which documents a link between levels of these so-called polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in office air and in the blood of workers,…