Low Testosterone Linked to Alzheimer’s Disease

2010 study posted for filing

SLU Geriatrician Collaborates on Year-Long Study of Chinese Older Men

ST. LOUIS — Low levels of the male sex hormone, testosterone, in older men is associated with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to research by a team that includes a Saint Louis University scientist.

John Morley, M.D.

“Having low testosterone may make you more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease,” said John E. Morley, M.D., director of the division of geriatric medicine at Saint Louis University and a study co-investigator. “The take-home message is we should pay more attention to low testosterone, particularly in people who have memory problems or other signs of cognitive impairment.”

The study was published electronically prior to its print publication in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and led by Leung-Wing Chu, M.D., who is chief of the division of geriatric medicine at Queen Mary Hospital at the University of Hong Kong.

Researchers studied 153 Chinese men who were recruited from social centers. They were at least 55 years and older, lived in the community and didn’t have dementia. Of those men, 47 had mild cognitive impairment – or problems with clear thinking and memory loss.

Within a year, 10 men who all were part of the cognitively impaired group developed probable Alzheimer’s disease. These men also had low testosterone in their body tissues; elevated levels of the ApoE 4 (apolipoprotein E) protein, which is correlated with a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease; and high blood pressure.

“It’s a very exciting study because we’ve shown that a low level of testosterone is one of the risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease,” Morley said.

The findings corroborate findings in previous studies of older Caucasian men that show low testosterone is associated with impaired thinking and Alzheimer’s disease. They suggest that testosterone may have a protective value against Alzheimer’s disease.

The next step, Morley said, is to conduct a large-scale study that investigates the use of testosterone in preventing Alzheimer’s disease. Morley and his co-authors advocate studying the effectiveness of testosterone replacement in older men who have both mild memory problems and low testosterone in staving off Alzheimer’s disease.

Plantain and broccoli fibers may block key stage in Crohn’s disease development

2010 study posted for filing

Contact: Emma Dickinson edickinson@bmjgroup.com 44-207-383-6529 BMJ-British Medical Journal

Translocation of Crohn’s disease Escherichia coli across M-cells: Contrasting effects of soluble plant fibers and emulsifiers

Plantain and broccoli fibres may block a key stage in the development of the inflammatory bowel disorder, Crohn’s disease, suggests preliminary research published online in Gut.

The causes of Crohn’s disease are thought to be a mix of genetic and environmental factors, one of which is very likely to be diet.

The disease is significantly less common in developing countries, where fibrous fruit and vegetables are dietary staples, and its incidence has recently risen rapidly in Japan, in tandem with the increasing adoption of a more Westernised diet.

One of the key stages in the development of Crohn’s is invasion of the cells lining the bowel (epithelial cells) by bacteria, particularly a “sticky” type of Escherichia coli, so the researchers looked at dietary agents that might influence this process.

They cultured M (microfold) cells, bowel lining cells that are the common entry point for invading bacteria that cause diarrhoea – a process known as translocation.

The researchers tested whether preparations of plant soluble fibres prepared from leeks, apples, broccoli, and plantains, and the fat emulsifiers polysorbate 60 and 80, commonly used in processed food manufacture, could alter E coli translocation across M cells.

Plantain and broccoli fibres (5 mg/ml) reduced translocation of E. coli by between 45% and 82%, while leek and apple fibres had no noticeable impact. By contrast, the emulsifier polysorbate 80 substantially increased translocation.

These results were then confirmed in tissue samples taken from patients undergoing surgery for other gut disorders.

The findings suggest that supplementing the diet with broccoli/plantain fibres might prevent relapse of Crohn’s disease, say the authors.

They go on to add that the results could have further implications for the treatment of Crohn’s disease as many enteral feeds contain emulsifiers, which may account for the variable response to this type of treatment.

Study shows how dietary supplement may block cancer cells

2010 study posted for filing

 

Contact: Darrell E. Ward Darrell.Ward@osumc.edu 614-293-3737 Ohio State University Medical Center

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center-Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James) have discovered how a substance that is produced when eating broccoli and Brussels sprouts can block the proliferation of cancer cells.

Compelling evidence indicates that the substance, indole-3-carbinol (I3C), may have anticancer effects and other health benefits, the researchers say. These findings show how I3C affects cancer cells and normal cells.

The laboratory and animal study discovered a connection between I3C and a molecule called Cdc25A, which is essential for cell division and proliferation. The research showed that I3C causes the destruction of that molecule and thereby blocks the growth of breast cancer cells.

The study was published online June 29 in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

“Cdc25A is present at abnormally high levels in about half of breast cancer cases, and it is associated with a poor prognosis,” says study leader Xianghong Zou, assistant professor of pathology at the Ohio State University Medical Center.

The molecule also occurs at abnormally high levels in cancers of the breast, prostate, liver, esophagus, endometrium and colon, and in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and in other diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, he noted.

“For this reason, a number of anti-Cdc25 agents have been identified, but they have not been successful for cancer prevention or treatment due to concerns about their safety or efficacy,” says Zou, who is also a member of the OSUCCC-James Molecular Carcinogenesis and Chemoprevention program.

“I3C can have striking effects on cancer cells,” he explains, “and a better understanding of this mechanism may lead to the use of this dietary supplement as an effective and safe strategy for treating a variety of cancers and other human diseases associated with the overexpression of Cdc25A,” Zou says.

For this study, Zou and his colleagues exposed three breast cancer cell lines to I3C. These experiments revealed that the substance caused the destruction of Cdc25A. They also pinpointed a specific location on that molecule that made it susceptible to I3C, showing that if that location is altered (because of a gene mutation), I3C no longer causes the molecule’s destruction.

Last, the investigators tested the effectiveness of I3C in breast tumors in a mouse model. When the substance was given orally to the mice, it reduced tumor size by up to 65 percent. They also showed that I3C had no affect on breast-cell tumors in which the Cdc25A molecule had a mutation in that key location.

First evidence that chitosan could repair spinal damage

2010 study posted for filing

Contact: Kathryn Knight kathryn@biologists.com 44-078-763-44333 The Company of Biologists

Chitosan offers hope for spinal injury patients

This release is available in Chinese.

Richard Borgens and his colleagues from the Center for Paralysis Research at the Purdue School of Veterinary Medicine have a strong record of inventing therapies for treating nerve damage. From Ampyra, which improves walking in multiple sclerosis patients to a spinal cord simulator for spinal injury victims, Borgens has had a hand in developing therapies that directly impact patients and their quality of life. Another therapy that is currently undergoing testing is the use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to seal and repair damaged spinal cord nerve cells. By repairing the damaged membranes of nerve cells, Borgens and his team can restore the spinal cord’s ability to transmit signals to the brain. However, there is one possible clinical drawback: PEG’s breakdown products are potentially toxic. Is there a biodegradable non-toxic compound that is equally effective at targeting and repairing damaged nerve membranes? Borgens teamed up with physiologist Riyi Shi and chemist Youngnam Cho, who pointed out that some sugars are capable of targeting damaged membranes. Could they find a sugar that restored spinal cord activity as effectively as PEG? Borgens and his team publish their discovery that chitosan can repair damaged nerve cell membranes in The Journal of Experimental Biology on 16 April 2010 at http://jeb.biologists.org.

Having initially tested mannose and found that it did not repair spinal cord nerve membranes, Cho decided to test a modified form of chitin, one of the most common sugars that is found in crustacean shells. Converting chitin into chitosan, Cho isolated a segment of guinea pig spinal cord, compressed a section, applied the modified chitin and then added a fluorescent dye that could only enter the cells through damaged membranes. If the chitosan repaired the crushed membranes then the spinal cord tissue would be unstained, but if the chitosan had failed, the spinal cord neurons would be flooded with the fluorescent dye. Viewing a section of the spinal cord under the microscope, Cho was amazed to see that the spinal cord was completely dark. None of the dye had entered the nerve cells. Chitosan had repaired the damaged cell membranes.

Next Cho tested whether a dose of chitosan could prevent large molecules from leaking from damaged spinal cord cells. Testing for the presence of the colossal enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Borgens admits he was amazed to see that levels of LDH leakage from chitosan treated spinal cord were lower than from undamaged spinal cords. Not only had the sugar repaired membranes at the compression site but also at other sites where the cell membranes were broken due to handling. And when the duo tested for the presence of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS), released when ATP generating mitochondria are damaged, they found that ROS levels also fell after applying chitosan to the damaged tissue: chitosan probably repairs mitochondrial membranes as well as the nerve cell membranes.

But could chitosan restore the spinal cord’s ability to transmit electrical signals to the brain through a damaged region? Measuring the brain’s response to nerve signals generated in a guinea pig’s hind leg, the duo saw that the signals were unable to reach the brain through a damaged spinal cord. However, 30·min after injecting chitosan into the rodents, the signals miraculously returned to the animals’ brains. Chitosan was able to repair the damaged spinal cord so that it could carry signals from the animal’s body to its brain.

Borgens is extremely excited by this discovery that chitosan is able to locate and repair damaged spinal cord tissue and is even more enthusiastic by the prospect that nanoparticles of chitosan could also target delivery of neuroprotective drugs directly to the site of injury ‘giving us a dual bang for our buck,’ says Borgens.

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IF REPORTING ON THIS STORY, PLEASE MENTION THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY AS THE SOURCE AND, IF REPORTING ONLINE, PLEASE CARRY A LINK TO: http://jeb.biologists.org

REFERENCE: Cho, Y., Shi, R. and Borgens, R. B. (2010). Chitosan produces potent neuroprotection and physiological recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury. J. Exp. Biol. 213, 1513-1520.

This article is posted on this site to give advance access to other authorised media who may wish to report on this story. Full attribution is required, and if reporting online a link to jeb.biologists.com is also required. The story posted here is COPYRIGHTED. Therefore advance permission is required before any and every reproduction of each article in full. PLEASE CONTACT permissions@biologists.com

THIS ARTICLE APPEARS IN THE JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGY ON: 16 April 2010. EMBARGOED UNTIL FRIDAY, 16 April 2010, 00.15 HRS EDT (05:15 HRS BST)

Spices halt growth of breast stem cells, U-M study finds ( Curcumin, piperine )

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: Nicole Fawcett nfawcett@umich.edu 734-764-2220 University of Michigan Health System

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A new study finds that compounds derived from the spices turmeric and pepper could help prevent breast cancer by limiting the growth of stem cells, the small number of cells that fuel a tumor’s growth.

Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that when the dietary compounds curcumin, which is derived from the Indian spice turmeric, and piperine, derived from black peppers, were applied to breast cells in culture, they decreased the number of stem cells while having no effect on normal differentiated cells.

“If we can limit the number of stem cells, we can limit the number of cells with potential to form tumors,” says lead author Madhuri Kakarala, M.D., Ph.D., R.D., clinical lecturer in internal medicine at the U-M Medical School and a research investigator at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

Cancer stem cells are the small number of cells within a tumor that fuel the tumor’s growth. Current chemotherapies do not work against these cells, which is why cancer recurs and spreads. Researchers believe that eliminating the cancer stem cells is key to controlling cancer. In addition, decreasing the number of normal stem cells – unspecialized cells that can give rise to any type of cell in that organ – can decrease the risk of cancer.

In this study, a solution of curcumin and piperine was applied to the cell cultures at the equivalent of about 20 times the potency of what could be consumed through diet. The compounds are available at this potency in a capsule form that could be taken by mouth. (Note: This work has not been tested in patients, and patients are not encouraged to add curcumin or piperine supplements to their diet at this time.)

The researchers applied a series of tests to the cells, looking at markers for breast stem cells and the effects of curcumin and piperine, both alone and combined, on the stem cell levels. They found that piperine enhanced the effects of curcumin, and that the compounds interrupted the self-renewal process that is the hallmark of cancer-initiating stem cells. At the same time, the compounds had no affect on cell differentiation, which is the normal process of cell development.

“This shows that these compounds are not toxic to normal breast tissue,” Kakarala says. “Women at high risk of breast cancer right now can choose to take the drugs tamoxifen or raloxifene for prevention, but most women won’t take these drugs because there is too much toxicity. The concept that dietary compounds can help is attractive, and curcumin and piperine appear to have very low toxicity.”

Curcumin and piperine have been explored by other researchers as a potential cancer treatment. But this paper, published online in the journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, is the first to suggest these dietary compounds could prevent cancer by targeting stem cells.

In addition, tamoxifen or raloxifene are designed to affect estrogen, which is a factor in most, but not all breast cancers. In fact, the aggressive tumors that tend to occur more often in women with a family history or genetic susceptibility are typically not affected by estrogen. Because curcumin and piperine limit the self renewal of stem cells, they would impact cancers that are not estrogen sensitive as well as those that are.

Researchers are planning an initial Phase I clinical trial to determine what dose of curcumin or piperine can be tolerated in people. The trial is not expected to begin accruing participants until spring.

###

Breast cancer statistics: 194,280 Americans will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year and 40,610 will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society

Additional authors: Dean Brenner, Hasan Korkaya, Connie Cheng, Karim Tazi, Christophe Ginestier, Suling Liu, Gabriel Dontu and Max Wicha, all from U-M

Funding: National Institutes of Health; curcumin and piperine were donated by Sabinsa Co.

Reference: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, DOI: 10.1007/s10549-009-0612-x

Resources: U-M Cancer AnswerLine, 800-865-1125 U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center, www.mcancer.org Cancer’s Stem Cell Revolution, www.mcancer.org/stemcells

71st Health Research Report 08 DEC 2009 – Reconstruction

 

Editors Top Five:

 

1. Aspirin, Tylenol May Decrease Effectiveness of Vaccines (actually all antibodies, vaccinated or not) MUST READ

2. Popular diabetes drugs linked to increased risk of heart failure and death

3. Coffee consumption associated with reduced risk of advanced prostate cancer

4. Spices halt growth of breast stem cells, U-M study finds

5. Young adults’ blood lead levels linked to depression, panic disorder

 

In this issue:

 

1. Chicken capsules good for aching joints

2. Long-term physical activity has an anti-aging effect at the cellular level

3. To keep muscles strong, the ‘garbage’ has to go

4. Will copper keep us safe from the superbugs?

5. Are the effects of pornography negligible?

6. Aspirin, Tylenol May Decrease Effectiveness of Vaccines (actually all antibodies, vaccinated or not) MUST READ

7. Young adults who exercise get higher IQ

8. Toy recall of 2007 hurt innocent companies

9. Childhood lead exposure causes permanent brain damage

10. Green tea chemical combined with another may hold promise for treatment of brain disorders

11. Popular diabetes drugs linked to increased risk of heart failure and death

12. Researchers find increased dairy intake reduces risk of uterine fibroids in black women

13. Mayo Clinic and collaborators find vitamin D levels associated with survival in lymphoma patients

14. Antioxidant compound reduced incidence of colorectal metachronous adenomas

15. Exercise reduces death rate in prostate cancer patients

16. Coffee consumption associated with reduced risk of advanced prostate cancer

17. Young adults’ blood lead levels linked to depression, panic disorder

18. Spices halt growth of breast stem cells, U-M study finds

19. Most antidepressants miss key target of clinical depression

Health Research Report

71st  Issue Date 08 DEC 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.engineeringevil.com

Aspirin Misuse May Have Made 1918 Flu Pandemic Worse

2009 study posted for filing

 

The devastation of the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic is well known, but a new article suggests a surprising factor in the high death toll: the misuse of aspirin. Appearing in the November 1 issue of Clinical Infectious Diseases and available online now, the article sounds a cautionary note as present day concerns about the novel H1N1 virus run high.

 

High aspirin dosing levels used to treat patients during the 1918-1919 pandemic are now known to cause, in some cases, toxicity and a dangerous build up of fluid in the lungs, which may have contributed to the incidence and severity of symptoms, bacterial infections, and mortality. Additionally, autopsy reports from 1918 are consistent with what we know today about the dangers of aspirin toxicity, as well as the expected viral causes of death.

 

The motivation behind the improper use of aspirin is a cautionary tale, said author Karen Starko, MD. In 1918, physicians did not fully understand either the dosing or pharmacology of aspirin, yet they were willing to recommend it. Its use was promoted by the drug industry, endorsed by doctors wanting to “do something,” and accepted by families and institutions desperate for hope.

 

“Understanding these natural forces is important when considering choices in the future,” Dr. Starko said. “Interventions cut both ways. Medicines can save and improve our lives. Yet we must be ever mindful of the importance of dose, of balancing benefits and risks, and of the limitations of our studies.”

67th Health Research Report 13 OCT 2009 – Reconstruction

Editors Top Five:

1. Aspirin Misuse May Have Made 1918 Flu Pandemic Worse

2. Can strep throat cause OCD, Tourette syndrome?

3. Unnatural selection: Birth control pills may alter choice of partners

4. Where’s the Science? The Sorry State of Psychotherapy

5. Oxidized form of a common vitamin may bring relief for ulcerative colitis

In this Issue:

1. Obesity in middle-aged women cuts chance of a long and healthy life by almost 80 percent

2. Can strep throat cause OCD, Tourette syndrome?

3. Antidepressant and placebo are equally effective in child pain relief

4. Over 65s should take high dose vitamin D to prevent falls, say researchers

5. Oxidized form of a common vitamin may bring relief for ulcerative colitis

6. LSUHSC RESEARCH SHOWS FISH OIL MAY PROTECT AGAINST STROKE FROM RUPTURED CAROTID ARTERY PLAQUES

7. Aspirin Misuse May Have Made 1918 Flu Pandemic Worse

8. Where’s the Science? The Sorry State of Psychotherapy

9. Curcumin may inhibit nicotine-induced activation of head and neck cancers

10. Higher folates, not antioxidants, can reduce hearing loss risk in men

11. Antidepressant use during pregnancy associated with some adverse outcomes in newborns

12. Bell’s palsy: Study calls for rethink of cause and treatment

13. Future diabetes treatment may use resveratrol to target the brain

14. Eating liquorice in pregnancy may affect a child’s IQ and behavior

15. Unnatural selection: Birth control pills may alter choice of partners

16. Women with breast cancer have low vitamin D levels

17. No such thing as ‘junk RNA,’ say Pitt researchers

Health Research Report

67th  Issue Date 13 OCT 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.engineeringevil.com

66th Health Research Report 29 SEP 2009 – Reconstruction

 Editors Top Five:

1. Zero tolerance, zero effect

2. New vitamin K analysis supports the triage theory

3. Study reveals 2/3 of prostate cancer patients do not need treatment

4. Gut worms may protect against house-dust mite allergy

5. Medical ethics experts identify, address key issues in H1N1 pandemic

In this Issue:

1. Scientists cure color blindness in monkeys

2. Rich people don’t need friends

3. New evidence that green tea may help improve bone health

4. Zero tolerance, zero effect

5. Chemobrain – the flip side of surviving cancer

6. New vitamin K analysis supports the triage theory

7. ANTIOXIDANT CONTROLS SPINAL CORD DEVELOPMENT

8. Scientists find that individuals in vegetative states can learn

9. Early results: In children, 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine works like seasonal flu vaccine

10. Insufficient levels of vitamin D puts elderly at increased risk of dying from heart disease

11. New research provides new insight into age-related muscle decline

12. Medical ethics experts identify, address key issues in H1N1 pandemic

13. Study reveals 2/3 of prostate cancer patients do not need treatment

14. Heparin can cause skin lesions

15. Gut worms may protect against house-dust mite allergy

16. Most would refuse emergency use H1N1 vaccine or additive

17. Young Adults May Outgrow Bipolar Disorder

Health Research Report

66th  Issue Date 29 SEP 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.engineeringevil.com

On-the-job pesticide exposure associated with Parkinson’s disease

Contact: Jonathan Friedman jfriedman@thepi.org 408-542-5606 JAMA and Archives Journals

Individuals whose occupation involves contact with pesticides appear to have an increased risk of having Parkinson’s disease, according to a report in the September issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

The development of Parkinson’s disease related to chemical exposure was identified in the late 20th century, according to background information in the article. Since then, occupations such as farming, teaching and welding have all been proposed to increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease. However, associations have been inconsistent and few previous studies have evaluated the direct relationship between occupational chemical exposure and disease risk.

Caroline M. Tanner, M.D., Ph.D., of the Parkinson’s Institute, Sunnyvale, Calif., and colleagues studied 519 individuals with Parkinson’s disease and 511 controls who were the same age and sex and lived in the same location. Participants were surveyed about their occupational history and exposure to toxins, including solvents and pesticides.

Working in agriculture, education, health care or welding was not associated with Parkinson’s disease, nor was any other specific occupation studied after adjustment for other factors.

Among the patients with Parkinson’s disease, 44 (8.5 percent) reported pesticide exposure compared with 27 (5.3 percent) of controls, such that occupational pesticide exposure was associated with an increased risk of the disease. “Growing evidence suggests a causal association between pesticide use and parkinsonism. However, the term ‘pesticide’ is broad and includes chemicals with varied mechanisms,” the authors write. “Because few investigations have identified specific pesticides, we studied eight pesticides with high neurotoxic plausibility based on laboratory findings. Use of these pesticides was associated with higher risk of parkinsonism, more than double that in those not exposed.”

Three individual compounds—an organochloride (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), an herbicide (paraquat) and an insecticide (permethrin)—were associated with a more than three-fold increased risk of Parkinson’s disease. All three have been shown to have effects on dopaminergic neurons—affected by Parkinson’s disease—in the laboratory.

“This convergence of epidemiologic and laboratory data from experimental models of Parkinson’s disease lends credence to a causative role of certain pesticides in the neurodegenerative process,” the authors conclude. “Other pesticide exposures such as hobby gardening, residential exposure, wearing treated garments or dietary intake were not assessed. Because these exposures may affect many more subjects, future attention is warranted.”

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(Arch Neurol. 2009;66[9]:1106-1113. Available pre-embargo to the media at www.jamamedia.org.)

Editor’s Note: This study was supported by an unrestricted grant from a group of current and former manufacturers of welding consumables awarded to The Parkinson’s Institute. Co-author Dr. Hauser has received fees for providing expert testimony in cases related to Parkinson’s disease in welders. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

65th Health Resarch Report 15 SEP 2009 – Reconstruction

Editors Top Five:

1. 75 percent would consider letting an unsupervised trainee perform surgery if it could be done quicker

2. Vitamin C deficiency impairs early brain development –

3. Study reveals new role of vitamin C in skin protection

4. ‘Dung of the devil’ plant roots point to new swine flu drugs

5. Popular stomach acid reducer triples risk of developing pneumonia

In this issue:

1. Biotransformed blueberry juice fights fat and diabetes

2. Exercise Minimizes Weight Regain By Reducing Appetite, Burning Fat,

3. And Lowering ‘Defended’ Body Weight

4. Vitamin C deficiency impairs early brain development –

5. UAB Researchers Find Possible Use for Kudzu, the Vine That Ate the South

6. Was the public health response to swine flu alarmist?

7. People with type 2 diabetes not meeting important nutritional recommendations

8. Anticancer compound found in American may apple

9. How manuka honey helps fight infection

10. Houseplants cut indoor ozone

11. High fruit and vegetable intake positively correlated with antioxidant status, cognitive performance

12. 75 percent would consider letting an unsupervised trainee perform surgery if it could be done quicker

13. Study reveals new role of vitamin C in skin protection

14. Regular aerobic exercise reduces health concerns associated with fatty liver

15. ‘Dung of the devil’ plant roots point to new swine flu drugs

16. On-the-job pesticide exposure associated with Parkinson’s disease

17. Antioxidant ingredient proven to relieve stress (S.O.D.)

18. Green tea component may help preserve stored platelets, tissues

19. Popular stomach acid reducer triples risk of developing pneumonia

20. Study Shows Common Pain Cream Could Protect Heart During Attack

21. Supplementing babies’ formula with DHA boosts cognitive development

22. Swine flu vaccination: A test subject speaks out.

Health Research Report

65th  Issue Date 15 SEP 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

www.youtube.com/vhfilm www.facebook.com/engineeringevil

www.engineeringevil.com

CDC Wants Safety Threat Information on Goose Flu

WASHINGTON (CN) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention request information and comments to questions on a highly contagious “goose” variant of avian influenza H5N1 viruses.

The viruses contain a hemagglutinin from the Goose/Guangdong/1/96 lineage. The CDC, among other questions, asks about “their potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety.”

The CDC notes on its website that ferrets can transmit this variant, and it has been associated with infections in humans.

Comments will be accepted until Dec. 17.

For more information, click the document icon for this regulation and others.

http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/10/23/51581.htm

Cancer drug causes patient to lose fingerprints and be detained by US immigration

2009 study posted for filing

 

Contact: Emma Mason
wordmason@mac.com
44-771-129-6986
European Society for Medical Oncology

Immigration officials held a cancer patient for four hours before they allowed him to enter the USA because one of his cancer drugs caused his fingerprints to disappear. His oncologist is now advising all cancer patients who are being treated with the commonly used drug, capecitabine, to carry a doctor’s letter with them if they want to travel to the USA.

The incident is highlighted in a letter to the cancer journal, Annals of Oncology [1], published online today (Wednesday 27 May). According to the oncologist, several other cancer patients have reported loss of fingerprints on their blog sites, and some have also commented on similar problems entering the USA.

Dr Eng-Huat Tan, a senior consultant in the medical oncology department at the National Cancer Centre, Singapore, described how his patient, a 62-year-old man, had head and neck cancer that had spread (metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma), but which had responded well to chemotherapy. To help prevent a recurrence of the cancer the patient was put on a maintenance dose of capecitabine, an anti-metabolite drug.

Capecitabine is a common anti-cancer drug used in the treatment of a number of cancers such as head and neck cancers, breast, stomach and colorectal cancers. One of its adverse side-effects can be hand-foot syndrome; this is chronic inflammation of the palms or soles of the feet and the skin can peel, bleed and develop ulcers or blisters. “This can give rise to eradication of finger prints with time,” said Dr Tan.

The patient, Mr S, developed a mild case of hand-foot syndrome, and because it was not affecting his daily life he was kept on a low dose of the drug.

“In December 2008, after more than three years of capecitabine, he went to the United States to visit his relatives,” wrote Dr Tan. “He was detained at the airport customs for four hours because the immigration officers could not detect his fingerprints. He was allowed to enter after the custom officers were satisfied that he was not a security threat. He was advised to travel with a letter from his oncologist stating his condition and the treatment he was receiving to account for his lack of fingerprints to facilitate his entry in future.”

Foreign visitors have been asked to provide fingerprints at USA airports for several years now, and the images are matched with millions of visa holders to detect whether the new visa applicant has a visa under a different name. “These fingerprints are also matched to a list of suspected criminals,” wrote Dr Tan.

Mr S was not aware that he had lost his fingerprints before he travelled.

Dr Tan concludes: “In summary, patients taking long-term capecitabine may have problems with regards to fingerprint identification when they enter United States’ ports or other countries that require fingerprint identification and should be warned about this. It is uncertain when the onset of fingerprint loss will take place in susceptible patients who are taking capecitabine. However, it is possible that there may be a growing number of such patients as Mr S who may benefit from maintenance capecitabine for disseminated malignancy. These patients should prepare adequately before travelling to avert the inconvenience that Mr S was put through.”

Dr Tan said that he would recommend patients on capecitabine to carry a doctor’s letter with them. “My patient subsequently travelled again with a letter from us and he had fewer problems getting through.”

 

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Notes:
[1] Travel warning with capecitabine. Annals of Oncology. doi:10.1093/annonc/mdp278
[2] Due to patient confidentiality it is not possible to identify Mr S.

140th Health Research Report 19 OCT 2012

 

Editors Top Five:

  1. CAFFEINE MAY BLOCK INFLAMMATION LINKED TO MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
  2. MINUTES OF HARD EXERCISE CAN LEAD TO ALL-DAY CALORIE BURN
  3. PREBIOTIC MAY HELP PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL FAILURE GROW NEW AND BETTER GUT
  4. LINK BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND MENTAL ILLNESS CONFIRMED
  5. LEAVES OF CAROB TREE, SOURCE OF CHOCOLATE SUBSTITUTE, FIGHT FOOD-POISONING BACTERIA: LISTERIA

In This Issue:

  1. PRENATAL MERCURY EXPOSURE MAY BE ASSOCIATED WITH RISK OF ADHD-RELATED BEHAVIORS
  2. CAFFEINE MAY BLOCK INFLAMMATION LINKED TO MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
  3. COFFEE SPEEDS UP RETURN OF BOWEL FUNCTION AFTER COLON SURGERY
  4. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE ALTERS INTESTINAL MICROBIAL FLORA, UCI STUDY FINDS
  5. MOUNT SINAI SCHOOL OF MEDICINE STUDY SHOWS VITAMIN C PREVENTS BONE LOSS IN ANIMAL MODELS
  6. RESEARCHERS DISCOVER HOW THE BODY USES VITAMIN B TO RECOGNIZE BACTERIAL INFECTION
  7. STUDY: PARENTING MORE IMPORTANT THAN SCHOOLS TO ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
  8. SURVEY SHOWS SUPPLEMENT USERS HAVE STRONG INTEREST IN NATURAL SOLUTIONS TO MANAGE THEIR CHOLESTEROL
  9. EXERCISE COULD FORTIFY IMMUNE SYSTEM AGAINST FUTURE CANCERS
  10. MINUTES OF HARD EXERCISE CAN LEAD TO ALL-DAY CALORIE BURN
  11. SCIENCE REVEALS THE POWER OF A HANDSHAKE
  12. PREBIOTIC MAY HELP PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL FAILURE GROW NEW AND BETTER GUT
  13. COCHRANE REVIEW FINDS NO BENEFIT FROM ROUTINE HEALTH CHECKS
  14. VITAMIN D SUPPLEMENTS MAY BENEFIT LUPUS PATIENTS
  15. LINK BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND MENTAL ILLNESS CONFIRMED
  16. MOTHER’S TOUCH COULD CHANGE EFFECTS OF PRENATAL STRESS
  17. EXERCISE MAY LEAD TO BETTER SCHOOL PERFORMANCE FOR KIDS WITH ADHD
  18. OBESE TEEN BOYS HAVE UP TO 50 PERCENT LESS TESTOSTERONE THAN LEAN BOYS, UB STUDY FINDS
  19. IMMUNE RESPONSE MAY LINK SOCIAL REJECTION TO LATER HEALTH OUTCOMES
  20. ANTIDEPRESSANTS LINKED TO INCREASED RISK OF STROKE
  21. 2 COMPONENTS OF RED MEAT COMBINED WITH ALTERATION IN DNA REPAIR INCREASE RISK FOR BLADDER CANCER
  22. DAILY MULTIVITAMINS REDUCE RISK OF CANCER IN MEN
  23. LEAVES OF CAROB TREE, SOURCE OF CHOCOLATE SUBSTITUTE, FIGHT FOOD-POISONING BACTERIA: LISTERIA
  24. LOW CALCIUM DIET LINKED TO HIGHER RISK OF HORMONE CONDITION IN WOMEN

Health Research Report

140th Issue Date 19 OCT 2012

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

Glutamine supplements show promise in treating stomach ulcers

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: Bonnie Prescott
bprescot@bidmc.harvard.edu
617-667-7306
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Amino acid helps offset stomach damage caused by H. pylori bacteria; animal study suggests popular supplement could also reduce risk of gastric cancers

BOSTON – Nearly 20 years ago, it was discovered that bacteria known as Helicobacter pylori were responsible for stomach ulcers. Since then, antibiotics have become the primary therapy used to combat the H. pylori infection, which affects approximately six percent of the world population and is also a primary cause of stomach cancer. But today the bacteria is growing increasingly resistant to antibiotics.

Now a study led by scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology demonstrates that the amino acid glutamine, found in many foods as well as in dietary supplements, may prove beneficial in offsetting gastric damage caused by H. pylori infection. Reported in the May 2009 issue of the Journal of Nutrition., the findings offer the possibility of an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of stomach ulcers.

“Our findings suggest that extra glutamine in the diet could protect against gastric damage caused by H. pylori,” says senior author Susan Hagen, PhD, Associate Director of Research in the Department of Surgery at BIDMC and Associate Professor of Surgery at Harvard Medical School. “Gastric damage develops when the bacteria weakens the stomach’s protective mucous coating, damages cells and elicits a robust immune response that is ineffective at ridding the infection.” Eventually, she notes, years of infection result in a combination of persistent gastritis, cell damage and an environment conducive to cancer development.

Glutamine is a nonessential amino acid naturally found in certain foods, including beef, chicken, fish, eggs, dairy products and some fruits and vegetables. L-glutamine – the biologically active isomer of glutamine – is widely used as a dietary supplement by body builders to increase muscle mass.

Hagen and her coauthors had previously shown that glutamine protects against cell death from H. pylori-produced ammonia. “Our work demonstrated that the damaging effects of ammonia on gastric cells could be reversed completely by the administration of L-glutamine,” explains Hagen. “The amino acid stimulated ammonia detoxification in the stomach – as it does in the liver – so that the effective concentration of ammonia was reduced, thereby blocking cell damage.”

She and her coauthors, therefore, hypothesized that a similar mechanism might be at work in the intact stomach infected with H. pylori. To test this hypothesis, the investigators divided 105 mice into two groups, which were fed either a standardized diet (containing 1.9 percent glutamine) or the same diet with supplemental L-glutamine (containing 6.9 percent glutamine) replacing carbohydrates for five percent of the total calories. After two weeks, the mice were subdivided into two more groups, with one group receiving a sham (fake) dose and the other group receiving a real dose containing H. pylori. (This resulted in four separate mouse groups: an uninfected control group; an uninfected glutamine group; an infected control group; and an infected glutamine group.)

The mice were then followed for a 20-week period, during which time samples of blood and stomach tissue were removed. Blood was analyzed for antibodies to specific types of T-helper immune cells, which mediate the body’s response to H. pylori infection. Stomach tissues were examined for evidence of damage and cancer progression and also chemically analyzed for cytokines (inflammatory substances) which are produced by T-helper cells.

Their results showed that at six-weeks-post infection, the animals exhibited increased expression of three cytokines – interleukin 4, interleukin 10 and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA. “These all play an important role in the stomach’s ability to protect against damaging effects resulting from other responses to H. pylori infection,” explains Hagen.

Of even greater significance, by week 20, the study results showed that, among the H. pylori-infected animals, the mice that were fed the L-glutamine diet exhibited lower levels of inflammation than did the mice that received the standard control diet.

“Because many of the stomach pathologies during H. pylori infection [including cancer progression] are linked to high levels of inflammation, this result provides us with preliminary evidence that glutamine supplementation may be an alternative therapy for reducing the severity of infection,” explains Hagen, adding that studies in human subjects will be the next step to determine the relevance of this finding in the clinical setting.

H. pylori bacteria infect more than half of the world’s population and were recently identified as a Group 1 carcinogen by the World Health Organization,” she adds. “Approximately 5.5 percent of the entire global cancer burden is attributed to H. pylori infection and, worldwide, over 900,000 new cases of gastric cancer develop each year. The possibility that an inexpensive, easy-to-use treatment could be used to modify the damaging effects of H. pylori infection warrants further study in clinical trials.”

 

###

 

Study coauthors include MIT investigators James Fox, Nancy Taylor and Barry Rickman and BIDMC investigators Jin-Rong Zhou and George Blackburn.

This study was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

BIDMC is a patient care, teaching and research affiliate of Harvard Medical School and consistently ranks in the top four in National Institutes of Health funding among independent hospitals nationwide. BIDMC is a clinical partner of the Joslin Diabetes Center and is a research partner of the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center. BIDMC is the official hospital of the Boston Red Sox. For more information, visit

Plant-Based Diets Can Remedy Chronic Diseases

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 63 percent of the deaths that occurred in 2008 were attributed to non-communicable chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, Type 2 diabetes and obesity—for which poor diets are contributing factors. Yet people that live in societies that eat healthy, plant-based diets rarely fall victim to these ailments. Research studies have long indicated that a high consumption of plant foods is associated with lower incidents of chronic disease. In the October issue of Food Technology magazine, Senior Writer/Editor Toni Tarver discusses recent discoveries in nutritional genomics that explain how plant-based diets are effective at warding off disease.

October 17, 2012

CHICAGO—According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 63 percent of the deaths that occurred in 2008 were attributed to non-communicable chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, Type 2 diabetes and obesity—for which poor diets are contributing factors. Yet people that live in societies that eat healthy, plant-based diets rarely fall victim to these ailments. Research studies have long indicated that a high consumption of plant foods is associated with lower incidents of chronic disease. In the October issue of Food Technology magazine, Senior Writer/Editor Toni Tarver discusses recent discoveries in nutritional genomics that explain how plant-based diets are effective at warding off disease.
The article indicates that bioactive compounds in plant foods play a role in controlling genetic and other biological factors that lead to chronic disease. For example, antioxidants in plant foods counter free radicals that can cause chronic inflammation and damage cells. And other plant compounds help control a gene linked to cardiovascular disease and plaque buildup in arteries and the genes and other cellular components responsible for forming and sustaining tumors.
William W. Li, M.D., President and Medical Director of the Angiogenesis Foundation in Cambridge, Mass., says that all consumers should look at their diets as if food is the medicine necessary to maintain healthy, disease-free lives. “Prevention is always better than a cure,” said Li. Foods that may help prevent cancer and other chronic diseases include artichokes, black pepper, cinnamon, garlic, lentils, olives, pumpkin, rosemary, thyme, watercress, and more.  For a more comprehensive list of medicinal foods, read “The Chronic Disease Food Remedy” in the October 2012 issue of Food Technology.

###

About IFT For more than 70 years, IFT has existed to advance the science of food. Our nonprofit scientific society—more than 18,000 members from more than 100 countries—brings together food scientists, technologists and related professions from academia, government, and industry. For more information, please visit ift.org.

55th Health Research Report 28 APR 2009 – Reconstruction

 

 

 

Editors Top Five: (not enough this week to justify)

 

In This Issue:

1.  Could senna improve the quality of colonoscopy preparation with magnesium citrate?

2. Oral Contraceptives Impair Muscle Gains In Young Women

3. New human study reinforces antioxidant benefits of tart cherries

4. An herbal extract inhibits the development of pancreatic cancer

5. Human lung tumors destroy anti-cancer hormone vitamin D, Pitt researchers find

6. Too much sugar is bad, but which sugar is worse: Fructose or glucose?

7. Charred meat may increase risk of pancreatic cancer

8. Vitamin D levels linked to asthma severity

9. Type of vitamin B1 could treat common cause of blindness

10. Long-term complications of melamine consumption in children

11. Drinking diet soda may reduce the risk of forming kidney stones

12. Whiter laundry and a surprising new treatment for kids’ eczema

13. Are we cherry picking participants for studies of antidepressants?

 

 

Health Research Report

55th Issue Date28 APR 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

 

54th Health Research Report 14 APR 2009 – Reconstruction

Editors Top Five:

1. The new ‘epigenetics:’ Poor nutrition in the womb causes permanent genetic changes in the offspring

2. Einstein scientists propose new theory of autism

3.Soybean component reduces menopause effects

4. Omega-3 kills cancer cells

5.Aspirin and similar drugs may be associated with brain microbleeds in older adults

In this Issue:

1.Physical activity may strengthen children’s ability to pay attention

2. How probiotics can prevent disease

3. Omega-3 kills cancer cells

4. Source of major health benefits in olive oil revealed

5. Einstein scientists propose new theory of autism

6. Broccoli sprouts may prevent stomach cancer by defeating Helicobacter pylori

7. Biology of flushing could renew niacin as cholesterol drug

8. Oral contraceptives associated with increased risk of lupus

9. Soybean component reduces menopause effects

10.Vitamin D Deficiency Related to Increased Inflammation in Healthy Women, MU Study Finds

11.Parkinson’s disease medication triggers destructive behaviors

12.Aspirin and similar drugs may be associated with brain microbleeds in older adults

13.The new ‘epigenetics:’ Poor nutrition in the womb causes permanent genetic changes in the offspring

14.Low glycemic breakfast may increase benefits of working out

Health Research Report

54th Issue Date 31 MAR 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

Common fragrance ingredients in shampoos and conditioners are frequent causes of eczema

Contact: Elin Lindstroem Claessen
elin.lindstrom@sahlgrenska.gu.se
46-317-863-869
University of Gothenburg

Considerably more people than previously believed are allergic to the most common fragrance ingredient used in shampoos, conditioners and soap. A thesis presented at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden found that over 5% of those who underwent patch testing were allergic to the air oxidized form of the fragrance ingredient linalool.

“I would suspect that about 2% of the complete population of Sweden are allergic to air oxidized linalool. That may not sound very much, but it is serious since linalool is so widely used as a fragrance ingredient. Linalool is found in 60-80 percent of the perfumed hygiene products, washing up liquids and household cleaning agents that can be bought in the nearest supermarket, and it can be difficult for people who are allergic to avoid these products”, says dermatologist Johanna Bråred Christensson, author of the thesis.

Around one person in five in Sweden has some form of contact allergy. Nickel is by far the most common substance that causes eczema, but the thesis shows that oxidized linalool occupies third place in the list, after nickel and cobalt.

In the study, oxidized linalool was added at patch testing for more than 3,000 patients who wanted to find out what was causing their eczema. Between 5% and 7% proved to be allergic to the oxidized form of the fragrance ingredient.

“Linalool is present in many products around us, and this is probably the reason that contact allergy to this material is so common. Some people can shower with shower cream that contains linalool but never develop contact allergy, but we know that the risk increases as the exposure to t! he substance increases”, says Johanna Bråred Christensson.

Linalool is a fragrance ingredient found naturally in lavender, mint, and other plants. Linalool breaks down when it comes into contact with oxygen, it becomes oxidized and can cause allergy. Manufacturers do include other substances in the products to delay this oxidation process, but allergenic substances can st! ill be formed from linalool when it is stored.

“One way of trying to minimize exposure to oxidized linalool is to avoid buying large packs of soap and shower cream, and always to replace the top after using a bottle”, says Johanna Bråred Christensson.!

EU legislation states that manufacturers must specify on the labels of hygiene products whether they contain linalool. Previous studies have shown that oxidized linalool may cause contact allergy in about 1% of patients with eczema.

 

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BRIEF FACTS: COMMON CONTACT ALLERGENS

Around 10-15% of all Swedes are allergic to nickel, and this is the ! most common form of contact allergy. Another substance that may be present in imitation jewellery is cobalt, to which around 2 3% of the population is allergic. Linalool occupies third place in the list after nickel and cobalt. It has been estimated that 2% of all Swedes are allergic to linalool. Other substances that can cause contact allergy include various perfumes and preservatives.

The Sahlgrenska Academy

The Sahlgrenska Academy is the faculty of health sciences at the University of Gothenburg. Education and research are conducted within the fields of pharmacy, medicine, odontology and health care sciences. About 4000 undergraduate students and 1000 postgraduate students are enrolled at Sahlgrenska Academy. The staff is about 1500 persons. 850 of them are researchers and/or teachers.

This thesis is based on the following papers:

I. Air oxidation increases skin irritation from fragrance terpenes Bråred Christensson J, Forsström P, Wennberg A-M, Karlberg A-T, Matura M.Contact Dermatitis: 2009: 60: 32-40.

II. Oxidized linalool – a significant contact sensitizer Bråred Christensson J, Matura M, Gruvberger B, Bruze M, Karlberg A-T. Manuscript.

III. Hydroperoxides form specific antigens in contact allergy. Bråred Christensson J, Matura M, Bäcktorp C, Börje A, Nilsson JLG, Karlberg A-T.Contact Dermatitis: 2006; 55(4): 230-7.

IV. Limonene hydroperoxide analogues differ in allergenic activity. Bråred Christensson J, Johansson S, Hagvall L, Jonsson C, Börje A, Karlberg A-T.Contact Dermatitis: 2008; 59(6): 344-52

Licorice extract blocks colorectal cancer in mice

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: Karen Honey
press_releases@the-jci.org
215-573-1850
Journal of Clinical Investigation

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as aspirin and ibuprofen, and drugs that selectively target a protein known as COX-2 prevent the development of intestinal polyps, the precursors of colorectal cancer. However, these drugs have severe side effects that preclude their routine use in the prevention of colorectal cancer. But now, a team of researchers, at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, has found that inhibiting an enzyme known as 11-beta-HSD2 (both genetically and using an extract from licorice) blocks COX-2 activity in human and mouse colorectal tumor cells, inhibiting their growth and metastasis in experimental models of colorectal cancer. Importantly, long-term inhibition of 11-beta-HSD2 did not have side effects on the heart and blood vessels of mice, as long-term treatment with selective COX-2 inhibitors does. The authors therefore suggest that inhibiting 11-beta-HSD2 might provide a new approach to preventing colorectal cancer.

In an accompanying commentary, Paul Stewart and Stephen Prescott, highlight the importance of these data for the development of a potential new therapeutic option in colorectal cancer.

###

TITLE: Inhibition of 11-beta–hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II selectively blocks the tumor COX-2 pathway and suppresses colon carcinogenesis in mice and humans

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Ming-Zhi Zhang
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
Phone: (615) 343-1548; Fax: (615) 343-2675; E-mail: ming-zhi.zhang@vanderbilt.edu.

Raymond C. Harris
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, USA.
Phone: (615) 322-2150; Fax: (615) 343-2675; E-mail: ray.harris@vanderbilt.edu.

View the PDF of this article at: https://www.the-jci.org/article.php?id=37398

ACCOMPANYING COMMENTARY
TITLE: Can licorice lick colon cancer?

AUTHOR CONTACT:
Paul M. Stewart
University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
Phone: 44-121-415-8708; Fax: 44-121-415-8712; Email: p.m.stewart@bham.ac.uk.

Stephen M. Prescott
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA.
Phone: (405) 271-7210; Fax: (405) 227-5809; Email: steve-prescott@omrf.org.

View the PDF of this article at: https://www.the-jci.org/article.php?id=38936

53rd Health Research Report 31 MAR 2009 – Reconstruction

 

Editors Top Five:

1. Common fragrance ingredients in shampoos and conditioners are frequent causes of eczema

2. Frankincense oil — a wise man’s remedy for bladder cancer

3. Review of probiotic trial research finds only Bifantis able to claim efficacy for IBS symptoms

4. Long-term L-carnitine supplementation prevents development of liver cancer

5. Exposure to insecticide may play role in obesity epidemic among some women

In This Issue:

1. Frankincense oil — a wise man’s remedy for bladder cancer

2. Studies show that nice guys finish first in business world

3. Conflicts of interest in clinical research

4. Majority of fire and ambulance recruits overweight

5. Exposure to insecticide may play role in obesity epidemic among some women

6. Cognitive Decline Begins in Late 20s, U.Va. Study Suggests

7. Mayo Clinic study suggests those who have chronic pain may need to assess vitamin D status

8. Gulf War veterans display abnormal brain response to specific chemicals

9. Proteins from garden pea may help fight high blood pressure, kidney disease

10. Licorice extract blocks colorectal cancer in mice

11. Eating red and processed meat associated with increased risk of death

12. Review of probiotic trial research finds only Bifantis able to claim efficacy for IBS symptoms

13. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce risk of advanced prostate cancer

14. Long-term L-carnitine supplementation prevents development of liver cancer

15. New Discovery Raises Doubts About Use of Certain Targeted Therapies in Bladder Cancer

16. Study: Morbidly Obese Sedentary For More Than 99 Percent of Day

17. Common fragrance ingredients in shampoos and conditioners are frequent causes of eczema

18. Tea tree oil and silver together make more effective antiseptics

19. Melatonin may be served as a potential anti-fibrotic drug


Health Research Report

53rd Issue Date 31 MAR 2009

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

UC Davis researchers discover Achilles’ heel in pancreatic cancer

2008 study posted for filing

Contact: Karen Finney
karen.finney@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu
916-734-9064
University of California – Davis Health System

Starving cancer cells of arginine cuts proliferation in half

UC Davis Cancer Center researchers have discovered a metabolic deficiency in pancreatic cancer cells that can be used to slow the progress of the deadliest of all cancers.

Published in the October issue of the International Journal of Cancer, study results indicate that pancreatic cancer cells cannot produce the amino acid arginine, which plays an essential role in cell division, immune function and hormone regulation. By depleting arginine levels in cell cultures and animal models, the team was able to significantly reduce pancreatic cancer-cell proliferation.

“There have been few significant advances in 15 years of testing available chemotherapy to treat pancreatic cancer,” said Richard Bold, chief of surgical oncology at UC Davis and senior author of the study. “The lack of progress is particularly frustrating because most patients are diagnosed after the disease has spread to other organs, eliminating surgery as an option. We have to turn back to basic science to come up with new treatments.”

Bold explained that average survival time for those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer is just four-and-a-half months, although chemotherapy can extend that prognosis up to six months.

“There is a dire need to find new options for these patients. While our findings do not suggest a cure for pancreatic cancer, they do promise a possible way to extend the life expectancies of those diagnosed with it,” Bold said.

Bold and his colleagues hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells lack the ability to produce arginine. In human pancreatic tumors, they measured levels of an enzyme — argininosuccinate synthetase — required to synthesize arginine.

The enzyme was not detected in 87 percent of the 47 tumor specimens examined, suggesting that the majority of pancreatic cancers require arginine for cell growth because of an inability to synthesize the amino acid.

The researchers then conducted further tests using pancreatic cell lines that represent the varying levels of argininosuccinate synthetase observed in human tumor specimens. Focusing on the lines with lowest levels, the researchers depleted arginine levels in cultures of pancreatic cell lines using arginine deiminase, an enzyme isolated from a Mycoplasma bacteria.

The enzyme was modified by adding polyethylene glycol chains to increase size and circulatory time.

The researchers found that exposing the pancreatic cancer cell lines to the modified arginine deiminase enzyme inhibited cancer-cell proliferation by 50 percent. They then treated mice bearing pancreatic tumors with the same compound and found an identical outcome: a 50 percent reduction in tumor growth. According to Bold, the current study represents a unique approach to cancer treatment in that it is one of the first to identify a metabolic pathway that can be leveraged to interrupt cancer growth.

“Instead of killing cells as with typical chemotherapy, we instead removed one of the key building blocks that cancer cells need to function,” Bold said.

Metabolic interruptions like this one are also being studied for their potential in treating cancers of the blood, such as leukemia and lymphoma. In those cases, depleting the amino acid asparagine may be used in slowing cancer-cell growth.

Bold and his colleagues are continuing their laboratory work on the effects of arginine deprivation on pancreatic cancer. They will next be looking for ways to increase pancreatic cell sensitivity to arginine deprivation.

The researchers have also begun designing human clinical trials in cooperation with the manufacturer of arginine deiminase, Polaris Pharmaceuticals.

“We’re looking at whether we can combine this treatment with certain kinds of chemotherapy,” Bold said. “This additional research is needed to inform the clinical work and move it forward more quickly. The better we understand this process, the more we can use it in the fight against pancreatic cancer.”

 

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Additional study authors included Tawnya Bowles, Joseph Galante, Colin Parsons and Subbulakshmi Virudachalam of the UC Davis Department of Surgery; and Randie Kim and Hsing-Jien Kung of the UC Davis Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine.

The study was funded by DesigneRxPharmacolgics of Vacaville, Calif.

UC Davis Cancer Center is a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center that cares for 9,000 adults and children each year from throughout the Central Valley and inland Northern California. The mutli-displinary pancreatico-biliary disease group focuses on diseases of the liver and pancreas. Specialists in surgical oncology, gastrointestinal surgery, medical oncology, interventional radiology, gastroenterology, radiology and radiation oncology work together to define treatment plans for patients and develop novel medications. For more information, visit www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/cancer.

41st Health Research Report 14 SEP 2008 – Recontsruction

 

Editors Top Five:

 

1. St. John’s wort relieves symptoms of major depression

2. New Study on Effects of Disclosing Financial Interests on Participation in Medical Research

3. Flu vaccine not associated with reduced hospitalizations or outpatient visits among young children

4. Research shows link between bisphenol A and disease in adults

5. Scientists develop new cancer-killing compound from salad plant

 

 

In this issue:

 

1. News media often do not report potential sources of bias in medical research

2. Danish study provides new information on hormone replacement therapy and the risk of heart attacks

3. During exercise, the human brain shifts into high gear on ‘alternative energy’

4. Too many calories send the brain off kilter

5. Second lumpectomy for breast cancer reduces survival rates

6. DNA of good bacteria drives intestinal response to infection

7. New Study on Effects of Disclosing Financial Interests on Participation in Medical Research

8. Disinfectants can make bacteria resistant to treatment

9. Flu vaccine not associated with reduced hospitalizations or outpatient visits among young children

10. Vitamin D deficiency common in patients with IBD, chronic liver disease

11. New studies examine the effectiveness of probiotics in IBS

12. Oral vitamin D may help prevent some skin infections

13. Olive oil ingredient ups the time between meals

14. Red wine may lower lung cancer risk

15. Honey helps to heal wounds

16. Herbal Menopause Therapy a Good Fit for Breast Cancer Patients?

17. Bisphenol A linked to chemotherapy resistance

18. St. John’s wort relieves symptoms of major depression

19. Mouse studies suggest daily dose of ginkgo may prevent brain cell damage after a stroke

20. Children with cystic fibrosis not well covered by guidelines for vitamin D needs

21. Vitamin D a key player in overall health of several body organs, says UC Riverside biochemist

22. Research shows link between bisphenol A and disease in adults

23. Pectin power

24. First evidence that a common pollutant may reduce iodine levels in breast milk

25. Vitamin K does not stem BMD decline in postmenopausal women with osteopenia ((((READ ARTICLE)))

26. Scientists develop new cancer-killing compound from salad plant

27. More Americans have, get treated for high blood pressure

28. Resveratrol prevents fat accumulation in livers of ‘alcoholic’ mice

Health Technology Research Synopsis

41st Issue Date 14 SEP 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

 

Pathogen that causes disease in cattle also associated with Crohn’s disease: Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis

For File 2008

Contact: Jim Sliwa
jsliwa@asmusa.org
202-942-9297
American Society for Microbiology

Research urgently needed to evaluate potential risks to humans

People with Crohn’s disease (CD) are seven-fold more likely to have in their gut tissues the bacterium that causes a digestive-tract disease in cattle called Johne’s disease. The role this bacterium may or may not play in causing CD is a top research priority, according to a new report released by the American Academy of Microbiology. The reports points out that the cause of CD is unknown, and the possible role of this bacterium—which could conceivably be passed up the food chain to people—has received too little attention from the research community.

The report, Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis: Incidental Human Pathogen or Public Health Threat?, summarizes conclusions and recommendations from a colloquium convened by the American Academy of Microbiology in June 2007 that brought together experts in microbiology, medicine, veterinary pathology, epidemiology, infectious diseases, and food safety. Colloquium participants described the state of knowledge about the relationship between Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and CD and developed a research agenda to move the field forward.

Scientists largely agree that multiple factors cause CD, including an environmental stimulus, a genetic propensity, and an overactive inflammatory and immune system triggered by an unknown event. There is mounting evidence that the unknown trigger may be infectious in origin, with several bacteria currently under consideration. “This complicated network of causation has confounded efforts to understand CD, says Carol Nacy, Ph.D., CEO of Sequella, Inc., who chaired the colloquium and is the report’s co-author. “MAP may be one of the causes of CD,” Nacy adds, “since, among other things, multiple studies identified the pathogen in tissues of CD patients. Treating some of these patients with antibiotics that target Mycobacteria provided relief from symptoms.”

Johne’s disease is a severe and fatal bacterial infection that strikes cattle, sheep, and other livestock. MAP has long been identified as the cause of Johne’s disease. Despite efforts to limit the spread of MAP, roughly 68% of cattle herds in this country are infected, meaning one or more animals in the herd carry the bacterium and may develop Johne’s disease or spread the infection to other animals. MAP has been found in some dairy products—milk and cheese—and beef on supermarket shelves.

The critical steps for research now, according to the report, are to determine whether humans are exposed and infected with MAP by eating infected meat and dairy products and whether MAP causes or incites CD or whether it is only incidentally present in those afflicted with the disease. The prospect that MAP could play a role in the incitement or development of CD is a sobering one, and, once the situation becomes clearer through research, there could be important changes in store for agriculture, food safety, and public health. It is in the best interest of the public that the possible connection between MAP and CD be explored exhaustively, according to the report.

The research agenda, however, is seriously hampered by the lack of reliable methods for isolating and indentifying MAP and for diagnosing people with MAP infection. Public health laboratories and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laboratories have made it clear they cannot grow MAP in the laboratory—an inability that hinders diagnosis and screening. The report recommends establishment of a task force to develop a specific road map for improved methods for MAP detection and diagnosis.

 

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A full copy of the report and further recommendations can be found on the Academy website at www.asm.org/colloquia/ext.

The American Academy of Microbiology is the honorific leadership group of the American Society of Microbiology. The mission of the Academy is to recognize scientific excellence, as well as foster knowledge and understanding in the microbiological sciences. For more information about the American Society for Microbiology, contact Barbara Hyde at 202-942-9206 or visit www.asm.org.

Androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer not associated with improved survival

Re-Post 2008

Contact: Michele Fisher
732-235-9872
JAMA and Archives Journals

A therapy that involves depriving the prostate gland the male hormone androgen is not associated with improved survival for elderly men with localized prostate cancer, compared to conservative management of the disease, according to a study in the July 9 issue of JAMA.

Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and the second most common cause of cancer death among men. “For the majority of men with incident prostate cancer (approximately 85 percent), disease is diagnosed at localized (T1-T2) stages, and standard treatment options include surgery, radiation, or conservative management (i.e., deferral of treatment until necessitated by disease signs or symptoms). Although not standard or sanctioned by major groups or guidelines, an increasing number of clinicians and patients have turned to primary androgen deprivation therapy (PADT) as an alternative to surgery, radiation, or conservative management, especially among older men,” the authors write. In a 1999-2001 survey, PADT had become the second most common treatment approach, after surgery, for localized prostate cancer, despite a lack of data regarding PADT’s efficacy.

Grace L. Lu-Yao, M.P.H., Ph.D., of the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, N.J., and colleagues assessed the association between PADT and disease-specific survival and overall survival in 19,271 men with T1-T2 (localized) prostate cancer (diagnosed in 1992 – 2002). The patients, age 66 years or older, did not receive definitive local therapy (i.e., such as prostatectomy) for prostate cancer. Among the patients, 7,867 (41 percent) received PADT, and 11,404 were treated with conservative management, not including PADT. During the follow-up period (through December 2006 for all-cause mortality and through December 2004 for prostate cancer–specific mortality) there were 1,560 prostate cancer deaths and 11,045 deaths from all causes.

The researchers found that use of PADT for localized prostate cancer was associated with lower 10-year prostate cancer–specific survival (80.1 percent vs. 82.6 percent) and no increase in 10-year overall survival compared with conservative management. However, in a prespecified subset analysis, PADT use in men with poorly differentiated cancer was associated with improved 10-year prostate cancer–specific survival (59.8 percent vs. 54.3 percent) but not overall survival (17.3 percent vs. 15.3 percent).

“The significant adverse effects and costs associated with PADT, along with our finding of a lack of overall survival benefit, suggest that clinicians should carefully consider the rationale for initiating PADT in elderly patients with T1-T2 prostate cancer,” the authors conclude.

 

###

(JAMA. 2008;300[2]:173-181. Available pre-embargo to the media at www.jamamedia.org)

Editor’s Note: Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc

35th Health Research Report 22 JUL 2008 – Reconstruction

 

Editors Top Five:

1. Environmental pollutant has sex-skewing effect

2. Stomach bug appears to protect kids from asthma, says NYU study

3. Cranberry juice creates energy barrier that keeps bacteria away from cells, study shows

4. 89 percent of children’s food products provide poor nutritional quality

5. Schering-Plough, Merck’s Vytorin misses study goal

 

 

In This Issue:

1. Androgen deprivation therapy for localized prostate cancer not associated with improved survival

2. Male cyclists risk sexual problems if they don’t choose the right bike

3. Aerosol toxins from red tides may cause long-term health threat

4. Scientists learn how food affects the brain

5. Risk of gall bladder disease with HRT patches lower than with HRT pills

6. 89 percent of children’s food products provide poor nutritional quality

7. Stomach bug appears to protect kids from asthma, says NYU study

8. Consumption of nut products during pregnancy linked to increased asthma in children

9. Environmental pollutant has sex-skewing effect

10. Possible link found between x-rays and prostate cancer

11. Study: Regular walking nearly halves elderly disability risk

12. The epigenetics of increasing weight through the generations

13. Removing ovaries during hysterectomy: Effects remain unknown

14. Cranberry juice creates energy barrier that keeps bacteria away from cells, study shows

15. Scientists identify how gastric reflux may trigger asthma

16. Schering-Plough, Merck’s Vytorin misses study goal

Health Technology Research Synopsis

35th Issue Date 22 JUL 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com

 

 

 

 

Study reveals inaccuracies in studies of cancer treatment; i.e.Prostate Androgen Therapy had a Higher Death rate than Non

Repost for Filing 2008

Contact: David Sampson
david.sampson@cancer.org
American Cancer Society

Certain biases may exist in observational studies that compare outcomes of different cancer therapies, making the results questionable. That is the conclusion of a new study published in the June 1, 2008 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The research suggests that observational studies should include more thorough information and should be better designed to minimize inaccuracies.

Clinical trials are considered the gold standard for demonstrating the effectiveness of new treatments for cancer, but observational studies, which do not involve randomization but where available data are nonetheless analyzed to make treatment comparisons, have also been used to provide information on how well patients respond to particular drugs. Many investigators perform these types of studies by analyzing data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Tumor Registry, a national population-based cancer registry that collects cancer-related information.

To determine the accuracy of observational studies on cancer treatments, Dr. Sharon H. Giordano of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and her colleagues compared the effectiveness of different cancer therapies in terms of prolonging survival in patients, using data from the SEER registry. They presented several examples, including re-analyses of previously published data. In all cases, they came up with improbable results, indicating how easy it is to generate questionable results when conducting an observational study.

In their first analysis, the researchers looked at data on a hormone therapy called androgen deprivation in men with stage III prostate cancer. Randomized clinical trials have shown that androgen deprivation can improve survival in these patients. When the investigators analyzed data from the SEER registry of more than 5,000 men, they found that men treated with androgen deprivation actually had a higher risk of death from prostate cancer than men who did not receive the therapy.

Dr. Giordano and her team next re-analyzed data from a previously published study of more than 43,000 men with localized prostate cancer who were treated compared with men who were not treated. Like the original study, the researchers’ analysis revealed that men who were treated for prostate cancer experienced lower mortality rates. However, they also found that in many cases, the cause of death was due to something other than prostate cancer, such as diabetes or pneumonia.

Finally, the investigators re-analyzed data from a previously published study on the effects of fluorouracil-based chemotherapy for colon cancer. They came to the same conclusion as the original research study—that chemotherapy for node positive colon cancer is associated with improved survival. However, they found that the link between the treatment and survival was strongest for non-cancer deaths, which presumably are not related.

The authors attributed the improbable results found in their three analyses to selection biases when patients are treated. For example, selection bias occurs when patients with poorer prognoses are more likely to receive a more efficacious drug, or when patients with better underlying health are more likely to receive a more toxic treatment because they are more likely to tolerate it.

The authors concluded that their findings “suggest that the results of observational studies of treatment outcomes should be viewed with caution.” They recommended that analyses of observational data should at a minimum attempt to segregate patient outcomes into those that could possibly be due to the treatments vs. those that could not. Many observational studies on cancer treatments only report death rates from all causes and do not specify cancer-related deaths.

###

Article: “The limits of observational data in determining outcomes from cancer therapy.” Sharon H. Giordano, Yong-Fang Kuo, Zhigang Duan, Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, Jean Freeman, and James S. Goodwin. CANCER; Published Online: April 21, 2008 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.23452); Print Issue Date: June 1, 2008

137th Health Research Report 07 SEP 2008

 Full Report at www.healthresearchreport.me

Editors Top Five:

 

1. Study Finds How BPA Affects Gene Expression, Anxiety; Soy Mitigates Effects

2. Vitamin B3 may offer new tool in fight against ‘superbugs’

3. Johns Hopkins team finds ICU misdiagnoses may account for as many annual deaths as breast cancer

4. Prenatal exposure to pesticide additive linked with childhood cough

5. Childhood virus RSV shows promise against adult cancer

 

 

In this Issue:

1. Vitamin B3 may offer new tool in fight against ‘superbugs’

2. How a virus might make you diabetic later in life

3. Adolescent pot use leaves lasting mental deficits

4. Nutrition tied to improved sperm DNA quality in older men

5. Energy drinks improve heart function

6. Breast milk promotes a different gut flora growth than infant formulas

7. Johns Hopkins team finds ICU misdiagnoses may account for as many annual deaths as breast cancer

8. WSU researcher documents links between nutrients, genes and cancer spread

9. Antibiotic residues in sausage meat may promote pathogen survival

10. Smoking after stroke increases death risk by 3-fold

11. The raccoon spreads dangerous diseases as it invades Europe

12. Chocolate: A sweet method for stroke prevention in men?

13. Bacterial cause found for skin condition rosacea

14. WSU researchers discover mechanism leading from trichomoniasis to prostate cancer

15. Lyme retreatment guidance may be flawed

16. Chemical exposure in the womb from household items may contribute to obesity

17. Affluent people less likely to reach out to others in times of chaos, study suggests

18. Coconut oil could combat tooth decay

19. Heavy drinking rewires brain, increasing susceptibility to anxiety problems

20. Even in normal range, high blood sugar linked to brain shrinkage

21. High doses of Vitamin D help tuberculosis patients recover more quickly

22. High levels of DDT in breast milk

23. Large Review Finds Some Evidence for “Chemo Brain” in Breast Cancer Survivors, Moffitt Cancer Center Says

24. Are restrictions to scientific research costing lives?

25. Toddlers increasingly swallowing liquid detergent capsules

26. Brainy beverage: Study reveals how green tea boosts brain cell production to aid memory

27. Children exposed to 2 phthalates have elevated risk of asthma-related airway inflammation

28. Prenatal exposure to pesticide additive linked with childhood cough

29. Nutritional supplement offers promise in treatment of unique form of autism

30. Diagnostic chest radiation before 30 may increase breast cancer risk

31. Report: Strategies to prevent noise-induced hearing loss, tinnitus in soldiers

32. Childhood virus RSV shows promise against adult cancer

33. Stress prompts some to retain as much salt as eating fries

34. Study Finds How BPA Affects Gene Expression, Anxiety; Soy Mitigates Effect

 

 

Health Technology Research Synopsis

137th Issue Date 07 SEP 2012

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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www.engineeringevil.com


Wormwood ( Artemesia ) may hold key to non-toxic Cancer and Leukemia treatment

Reposted at Request from 26-Nov-2001

Contact: Rob Harrill rharrill@u.washington.edu 206-543-2580 University of Washington

Two bioengineering researchers at the University of Washington have discovered a promising potential treatment for cancer among the ancient arts of Chinese folk medicine.

Research Professor Henry Lai and assistant research Professor Narendra Singh have exploited the chemical properties of a wormwood derivative to target breast cancer cells, with surprisingly effective results.  A study in the latest issue of the journal Life Sciences describes how the derivative killed virtually all human breast cancer cells exposed to it within 16 hours.

“Not only does it appear to be effective, but it’s very selective,” Lai said.  “It’s highly toxic to the cancer cells, but has a marginal impact on normal breast cells.”

The compound, artemisinin, isn’t new.  It apparently was extracted from the plant Artemesia  annua L., commonly known as wormwood, thousands of years ago by the Chinese, who used it to combat malaria.  However, the treatment was lost over time.  Artemisinin was rediscovered during an archaeological dig in the 1970s that unearthed recipes for ancient medical remedies, and has become widely used in modern Asia and Africa to fight the mosquito-borne disease.

The compound helps control malaria because it reacts with the high iron concentrations found in the malaria parasite.  When artemisinin comes into contact with iron, a chemical reaction ensues, spawning charged atoms that chemists call “free radicals.”  The free radicals attack cell membranes, breaking them apart and killing the single-cell parasite.

About seven years ago, Lai began to hypothesize that the process might work with cancer, too.

“Cancer cells need a lot of iron to replicate DNA when they divide,” Lai explained.  “As a result, cancer cells have much higher iron concentrations than normal cells.  When we began to understand how artemisinin worked, I started wondering if we could use that knowledge to target cancer cells.”

Lai devised a potential method and began to look for funding, obtaining a grant from the Breast Cancer Fund in San Francisco.  Meanwhile, the UW patented his idea.

The thrust of the idea, according to Lai and Singh, was to pump up the cancer cells with maximum iron concentrations, then introduce artemisinin to selectively kill the cancer.  To accommodate a rate of iron intake greater than normal cells, cancer cell surfaces feature greater concentrations of transferrin receptors – cellular pathways that allow iron into a cell.  Breast cancer cells are no exception.  They have five to 15 times more transferrin receptors on their surface than normal breast cells.

In the current study, the researchers subjected sets of breast cancer cells and normal breast cells to doses of holotransferrin (which binds with transferrin receptors to transport iron into cells), dihydroartemisinin (a more water-soluble form of artemisinin) and a combination of both compounds.  Cells exposed to just one of the compounds showed no appreciable effect.  Normal breast cells, exposed to both compounds, exhibited a minimal effect.  But the response by cancer cells when hit with first holotransferrin, then dihydroartemisinin, was dramatic.

After eight hours, just 25 percent of the cancer cells remained.  By the time 16 hours had passed, nearly all the cells were dead.

An earlier study involving leukemia cells yielded even more impressive results.  Those cells were eliminated within eight hours.  A possible explanation might be the level of iron in the leukemia cells.

“They have one of the highest iron concentrations among cancer cells,” Lai explained.  “Leukemia cells can have more than 1,000 times the concentration of iron that normal cells have.”

The next step, according to Lai, is animal testing.  Limited tests have been done in that area.  In an earlier study, a dog with bone cancer so severe it couldn’t walk made a complete recovery in five days after receiving the treatment.  But more rigorous testing is needed.

If the process lives up to its early promise, it could revolutionize the way some cancers are approached, Lai said.  The goal would be a treatment that could be taken orally, on an outpatient basis.

“That would be very easy, and this could make that possible,” Lai said.  “The cost is another plus – at $2 a dose, it’s very cheap.  And, with the millions of people who have already taken artemisinin for malaria, we have a track record showing that it’s safe.”

Whatever happens, Lai said, a portion of the credit will have to go to unknown medical practitioners, long gone now.

“The fascinating thing is that this was something the Chinese used thousands of years ago,” he said.  “We simply found a different application.”

###

For more information, contact Lai at (206) 543-1071 or hlai@u.washington.edu.  For more information on the journal Life Sciences, check the Web at:http://www.elsevier.com/locate/lifescie

Anti-cancer ( Avastin ) drug damages brain vessels

Contact: Hema Bashyam hbashyam@rockefeller.edu 212-327-7053 Journal of Experimental Medicine

The cancer drug Avastin (bevacizumab) is used to treat advanced bowel cancer in combination with chemotherapy. This drug targets a protein called VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) that stimulates blood vessel growth. Avastin inhibits the growth of tumors by cutting off their blood supply, which deprives them of oxygen and other nutrients. In a small percentage of patients, however, Avastin can cause neurological side effects ranging from headaches and blurry vision to potentially fatal seizures and brain swelling.

The new study reveals that VEGF normally protects the specialized cells that create a seal between the brain and spinal column and thus prevent fluid from leaking into the brain. When VEGF was blocked in mice, these cells died and the animals developed brain swelling. The authors suspect that Avastin’s side effects in humans may be caused by a similar phenomenon. Why these symptoms occur in only a few patients is not yet known

reposted at request from 2008

25th Health Research Report 20 FEB 2008 – Reconstruction

 

Editors Top Five:

 

1.      Purple pigments and obesity
2.      Fake malaria drugs made in China; how the winter vomiting virus evolves
3.      Study finds patients with complex fibroadenomas can avoid surgery
4.      A compound extracted from olives inhibits cancer cells growth and prevents their appearance
5.      Flu Vaccine doesn’t match most circulating viruses, health officials say

 

 

In this Issue:

  1. New study suggests link between environmental toxins and early onset puberty in girls
  2. Europe’s most common genetic disease is a liver disorder ( hemochromatosis )
  3. Sleep Duration May Play Important Role in Childhood Obesity
  4. Study suggests new therapy for lung disease patients (Current Therapy Wrong)
  5. Anti-cancer drug damages brain vessels
  6. Fatty acids beneficial in treatment for dry eye syndrome
  7. Purple pigments and obesity
  8. Fake malaria drugs made in China; how the winter vomiting virus evolves
  9. Autopsy findings suggest end of decline in coronary disease rates
  10. Study finds patients with complex fibroadenomas can avoid surgery
  11. Some cases of autism may be traced to the immune system of mothers during pregnancy
  12. A compound extracted from olives inhibits cancer cells growth and prevents their appearance
  13. U of I study: exercise to avoid gallstones!
  14. Metabolic syndrome linked to cold tolerance
  15. Cell phone-cancer link found by Tel Aviv University scientist
  16. Health effects of pesticide mixtures: Unexpected insights from the salmon brain
  17. As depression symptoms improve with antidepressants, hopelessness can linger
  18. Vaccine doesn’t match most circulating viruses, health officials say
  19. FDA ties pneumonia deaths to infant vaccine
     
    http://healthresearchreport.me/2008/02/20/25th-health-research-report-20-feb-2008-reconstruction/

    Health Technology Research Synopsis

    25th Issue Date 20 FEB 2008

    Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

    www.healthresearchreport.me www.vit.bz

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    www.engineeringevil.com

Sex hormones unrelated to prostate cancer risk

Contact: Liz Savage jncimedia@oxfordjournals.org 301-841-1287 Journal of the National Cancer Institute

Sex hormones circulating in the blood do not appear to be associated with prostate cancer risk, according to data from 18 prior studies. The analysis will be published online January 29 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Having high levels of male sex hormones, known as androgens, has long been hypothesized as a risk factor for prostate cancer. Nearly two dozen prospective studies have examined the relationship between circulating sex hormones and prostate cancer risk, but the results have been inconsistent.

Andrew Roddam, D.Phil., of the University of Oxford in England and colleagues at the Endogenous Hormones and Prostate Cancer Collaborative Group collected the original data from 18 studies and analyzed it to determine the relationship between blood levels of sex hormones and prostate cancer. The pooled data included 3,886 men with prostate cancer and 6,438 controls.

The researchers found no association between prostate cancer risk and blood levels of different forms of testosterone or estrogen.

“The results of this collaborative analysis of the existing worldwide data on the associations between endogenous hormone concentrations and prostate cancer risk indicate that circulating concentrations of androgens and [estrogens] do not appear to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer,” the authors write.

In an accompanying editorial, Paul Godley, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill commend the authors for collaborating on this analysis, and they encourage researchers to use the results as an opportunity to shift the focus of prostate cancer research.

“The study obliges the scientific community to move past a seductive, clinically relevant, and biologically plausible hypothesis and get on with the difficult task of exploring, analyzing, and characterizing modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer,” the editorialists write.

###

Contact:

  • Editorial: Diane Shaw, director of communications, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, dgs@med.unc.edu, (919) 966-5905

Citation:

  • Article: Endogenous Hormones and Prostate Cancer Collaborative Group. Endogenous Sex Hormones and Prostate Cancer: A Collaborative Analysis of 18 Prospective Studies. J Natl Cancer Inst 2008; 100: 170-183
  • Editorial: Carpenter WR, Robinson WR, Godley PA. Getting Over Testosterone: Postulating a Fresh Start for Etiologic Studies of Prostate Cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 2008; 100:158-159

Note to Reporters:

We have started up an e-mail list to alert reporters when papers are available on the EurekAlert site. If you would be interested on being on this list, please let us know at jncimedia@oxfordjournals.org. The content will continue to be available through EurekAlert’s e-mail system and our EurekAlert page.

The Journal of the National Cancer Institute is published by Oxford University Press and is not affiliated with the National Cancer Institute. Attribution to the Journal of the National Cancer Institute is requested in all news coverage. Visit the Journal online at http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/.

Reposted at request 2008

24th Health Research Report 06 FEB 2008 – Reconstruction

Health Technology Research Synopsis

24th Issue Date 06 FEB 2008

Compiled By Ralph Turchiano

Editors Top Five:

 

1.      Sex hormones unrelated to prostate cancer risk
2.      Over-the-counter eardrops may cause hearing loss or damage
3.      Researchers investigate links between prostate, cadmium, zinc
4.      Supplementary approach to malaria
5.      Why serotonin can cause depression and anxiety

 

 

In this issue:

 
1.      OTC cough medicine: Not worthwhile for children or adults?
2.      Cranberries might help prevent urinary infections in women
3.      Herbal remedy useful for heart failure, review finds
4.      Heart and stroke death rates steadily decline; risks still too high
5.      Modified Atkins diet can cut epileptic seizures in adults
6.      Sedentary lifestyles associated with accelerated aging process
7.      Study finds increasing rates of diabetes among older Americans
8.      Feds fund study of drug that may prevent radiation injury
9.      Over-the-counter eardrops may cause hearing loss or damage
10.  Regular marijuana use increases risk of hepatitis C-related liver damage
11.  Huge drop in preterm birth-risk among women taking folic acid 1 year before conception
12.  Babies excrete vaccine-mercury quicker than originally thought
13.  (An Extremely Flawed Study)
14.  Sex hormones unrelated to prostate cancer risk
15.  Viruses for a healthy pregnancy
16.  When it comes to Bisphenol A
17.  Researchers investigate links between prostate, cadmium, zinc
18.  Consumption of Fruits May Reduce the Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
19.  Sugary soft drinks linked to increased risk of gout in men
20.  Study finds widespread vitamin and mineral use among cancer survivors
21.  Using flower power to fight foot woes
22.  New, non-invasive prostate cancer test beats PSA in detecting prostate cancer, researchers report
23.  Are Trans Fat Labels Working?
24.  Why serotonin can cause depression and anxiety
25.  Iodized table salt may be low in iodine, raising health concerns
26.  Folate deficiency associated with tripling of dementia risk
27.  Grapefruit compound may help combat hepatitis C infection
28.  Supplementary approach to malaria
29.  Research shows a daily does of beetroot juice can beat high blood pressure
 
 

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www.engineeringevil.com

 

21st Health Research Report 26 DEC 2007 – Reconstruction

21st Health Research Report 26 DEC 2007 – Reconstruction (link below)

In This issue:

1. Elective Caesareans carry increased risk of breathing problems
2. Cholesterol-lowering drugs and the risk of hemorrhagic stroke
3. Turkish health workers condone wife beating
4. New clinical data shows chromium picolinate improves cognitive function
5. Green tea may protect brain cells against Parkinson’s disease
6. Vitamin B12 function may be diminished by excessive folate
7. Does treating worms in people with HIV slow progression to AIDS?
8. Walking and moderate exercise help prevent dementia
9. Breath test can discriminate between a bacterial overgrowth and IBS
10. Why don’t we get cancer all the time?
11. Why exertion leads to exhaustion
12. Why fish oil is good for you
 
http://healthresearchreport.me/2007/12/26/21st-health-research-report-26-dec-2007-reconstruction/

Suppressive effects of a phytochemical cocktail on prostate cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Abstract no. A104: 25% reduction in tumor size in 14 days

A commercially available nutrition drink reduces the growth of tumors in a mouse model of human prostate cancer by 25 percent in two weeks, according to researchers from the University of Sydney. The drink, Blueberry Punch, is a mixture of plant-based chemicals – phytochemicals – known to have anti-cancer properties.

“While individual phytochemicals are successful in killing cancer cells, we reasoned that synergistic or additive effects are likely to be achieved when they are combined.”

Singh and her colleagues studied the effect of the beverage on both cancer cell cultures and in mouse models that mimic human prostate cancer. After 72 hours of exposure to increasing concentrations of Blueberry Punch, prostate cancer cells showed a dose-dependent reduction in size and viability when compared with untreated cells, Singh says. After feeding mice a 10 percent solution of the punch for two weeks, the tumors in the test mice were 25 percent smaller than those found in mice that drank only tap water.

Based on these results, the researchers believe Blueberry Punch is now ready for human prostate cancer trials. Because Blueberry Punch is a food product rather than a drug, it is unlikely to have adverse reactions or side effects assuming that the individual is tolerant to all ingredients, Singh says. “The evidence we have provided suggests that this product could be therapeutic, although it requires clinical validation,” Singh said

Citrus compounds called limonoids targeted and stopped neuroblastoma cells in the lab.

Contact: Kathleen Phillips ka-phillips@tamu.edu 979-845-2872 Texas A&M AgriLife Communications

Citrus shows promise for certain childhood cancer

COLLEGE STATION – Orange juice and cancer don’t mix. In fact, the popular citrus drink could become a cocktail to prevent or stop the deadly disease in humans.

Research by Texas Agriculture Experiment Station scientists has shown that citrus compounds called limonoids targeted and stopped neuroblastoma cells in the lab. They now hope to learn the reasons for the stop-action behavior and eventually try the citrus concoction in humans.

Neuroblastomas account for about 10 percent of all cancer in children, Harris said, and is usually a solid tumor in the neck, chest, spinal cord or adrenal gland. The finding in citrus is promising not only for its potential to arrest cancer, but because limonoids induce no side affects, according to Dr. Ed Harris, Experiment Station biochemist who collaborated on the study with Dr. Bhimu Patil, a plant physiologist at the Texas A&M University-Kingsville Citrus Center in Weslaco.

“Limonoids are naturally occurring compounds,” Harris said. “Unlike other anti-cancer drugs that are toxic, limonoids apparently do not hurt a person. That’s the beautiful potential.”

Patil calls citrus fruit “a vast reservoir of anti-carcinogens.” As a plant physiologist, he has succeeded in isolating and purifying a number of limonoids from citrus so that the biochemists could evaluate and compare their anti-cancer abilities at the molecular level.

“Limonoids are unique to citrus,” Patil said. “They are not present in any other fruits or vegetables. My goal is to find the direct benefits of citrus on human health. ”

He said a challenging task is to isolate the limonoid compounds, “because some are present in very small concentrations.”

In fact, citrus breeders seeking to improve the fruit’s tastiness for consumers and yield for producers led researchers to discover limonoids – eight of which have been characterized from extractions at the Weslaco facility, according to the researchers.

“If I ask why one should drink orange juice every day,” Harris noted, “almost everyone would say for vitamin C. That’s true, but we also need to learn two new words – flavonoids and limonoids.”

Harris explained that flavonoids and limonoids – nutrient-packed pigments that give color and taste to fruit – may work against cancer in any of three ways: prevent it from forming, slow the growth of existing cancer, or kill cancer cells.

“The limonoids, which differ structurally from flavonoids, seem to do all three,” he said of tests in his lab by one of Patil’s graduate students, Shibu Poulose, who also worked in Harris’ College Station lab. Their work emphasized the compounds’ ability to kill existing the neuroblastoma cells with the rationale that if the method and time limonoids take to obliterate the cancer could be found, perhaps scientists could exploit it to help cure the disease.

What Poulose found with the extracted limonoid was that the neuroblastoma cells died with relatively small amounts of concentrated limonoids and all in 48 hours or less.

They tested this in several ways. First, the limonoids were put through a test to see whether they would quench the oxygen radicals – cancer-causing substances that are destructive to normal cells. The limonoids appeared to be as effective as vitamin C in some of the tests.

Test of cell viability were more impressive, however. The neuroblastoma cells were all dead within two days with just 5, 10 and 50 micromoles of limonoids.  A micromole is about the equivalent of a tiny skin flake. Some limonoids were more effective than others, but all had killing potential.  These amounts of limonoids could easily be obtained from a glass of orange or grapefruit juice.

Next, cell viability tests aimed at whether the cell death was caused by apoptosis — a programmed cell death that spirals in an unstoppable fashion unstoppably once the vulnerable spot on the cell is hit.

“Suppose we have cancer and the cancer cell mutates repeatedly until it takes over our organs,” he said. “So, a compound comes in and spots those cells with the unusual metabolism and kills them by degrading the cells’ protein and fragmenting their DNA until the cells succumb.

“Apoptosis is beneficial. It’s the immunity system in the body that causes the white cells to recognize things that are not supposed to be there and attack them,” Harris explained.  Apoptosis early in life removes those white cells that would attack the body’s own protein, for example.

To test this, the researchers applied 1, 5, 10 and 50 micromolar amounts of limonoids to neuroblastoma cells, then put an apoptosis-blocking chemical on an identical comparison set. Neuroblastoma cells with the blocker did not die, indicating that the limonoids trigger apoptosis which in turn results in the cell death. In their tests, the cancer cells treated with limonoids – but not the apoptosis blocker – all died within 36 hours.

The researchers also looked at caspases, destructive enzymes that are activated to cause chain reactions that lead to cell death. “A question was whether limonoids turn on apoptosis which then turn on the caspases and if so, whether that means there is caspases resting in our cells (that could be activated to help fight cancer in us),” he said.

This part of the research revealed that with only 5 micromoles of a limonoid known as LG, the cancer cells were dying in as little as 12 hours.

“The last phase in killing cancer is to make sure the DNA is destroyed because that is the death knell for the cell,” Harris said.  “It’s intriguing that this amount appeared to have no effect on normal cells and only certain types of cancer cells are vulnerable. Fortunately, breast cancer cells are on the list of vulnerable cells. This makes it all the more imperative to learn how the process works.

“We don’t have the answer to that yet,” he said, “but we have observed that those limonoids with the greatest potency have a closed ring in their chemical structure and that is different from other compounds.”

Limonoids with a sugar unit attached, the so-called limonoid glucosides, are water soluble and tasteless; those without the sugar, the aglycons, are responsible for bitterness of some citrus. It was the limonoid glucosides, in this study that had “a dramatic effect” on cancer cell death.

“Now that we have seen the cancer cells die and in such a short time,” Harris said, “we need to find out why they are so vulnerable and exploit it. It could be that ultimately we are able to give patients an oral cocktail of limonoids in such concentration as to stop their cancer.”

Patil said the researchers also will be studying limonoids to find the limits for adding to food. One of the limonoids, glucoside, is tasteless, he noted, so it might become a food additive  for its health benefits, but food engineers would need to know how much to add for human consumption.

His lab also is examining whether the compounds vary among citrus species and at  different times of the year.

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