Study is the first to show higher dietary acid load increases risk of diabetes ( Up to 56% Increased Risk )

Contact: Dr Guy Fagherazzi Guy.FAGHERAZZI@gustaveroussy.fr 33-142-116-140 Diabetologia A study of more than 60 000 women has shown that higher overall acidity of the diet, regardless of the individual foods making up that diet, increases the risk of type 2 diabetes. The study, the first large prospective study to demonstrate these findings, is published in Diabetologia,…

Statins block the ability of exercise to improve fitness levels

Cholesterol-Lowering Drug May Reduce Exercise Benefits for Obese Adults, MU Study Finds May 15, 2013 Story Contact(s): Jesslyn  Chew, ChewJ@missouri.edu, (573) 882-8353 By Kate McIntyre COLUMBIA, Mo. – Statins, the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide, are often suggested to lower cholesterol and prevent heart disease in individuals with obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which is…

Study shows drinking one 12oz sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by 22 percent

Contact: Sam Wong Press Office sam.wong@imperial.ac.uk 44-020-759-42198 Diabetologia Drinking one (or one extra)* 12oz serving size of sugar-sweetened soft drink a day can be enough to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 22%, a new study suggests. The research is published in  Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study…

Grape intake may protect against metabolic syndrome-related organ damage

April 22, 2013    Media Contact: Justin Harris       734-764-2220  Study shows grapes reduced inflammation and fat storage, improved antioxidant defense     ANN ARBOR, MI Consuming grapes may help protect against organ damage associated with the progression of metabolic syndrome, according to research presented Monday at the Experimental Biology conference in Boston. Natural components found…

Research suggests popular diabetes drugs can cause abnormal pancreatic growth in humans

Contact: Enrique Rivero erivero@mednet.ucla.edu 310-794-2273 University of California – Los Angeles Health Sciences Individuals who had taken a type of drug commonly used to treat Type 2 diabetes showed abnormalities in the pancreas, including cell proliferation, that may be associated with an increased risk of neuroendocrine tumors, according to a new study by researchers from…

Carnitine supplements reverse glucose intolerance in animals

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Mary Jane Gore mary.gore@duke.edu 919-660-1309 Duke University Medical Center DURHAM, N.C. – Supplementing obese rats with the nutrient carnitine helps the animals to clear the extra sugar in their blood, something they had trouble doing on their own, researchers at Duke University Medical Center report. A team led by…

Researchers find possible environmental causes for Alzheimer’s, diabetes : nitrates

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Nancy Cawley Jean njean@lifespan.org Lifespan Call for reducing nitrate levels in fertilizer and water, detoxifying food and water Providence, RI – A new study by researchers at Rhode Island Hospital have found a substantial link between increased levels of nitrates in our environment and food with increased deaths from…

Daily vibration may combat prediabetes in youth : 20min daily was better than prescription drugs at reducing levels of hemoglobin A1

Contact: Toni Baker tbaker@georgiahealth.edu 706-721-4421 Georgia Health Sciences University AUGUSTA, Ga. – Daily sessions of whole-body vibration may combat prediabetes in adolescents, dramatically reducing inflammation, average blood glucose levels and symptoms such as frequent urination, researchers report. In mice that mimic over-eating adolescents headed toward diabetes, 20 minutes of daily vibration for eight weeks restored…

Popular diabetes treatment could trigger pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Enrique Rivero erivero@mednet.ucla.edu 310-794-2273 University of California – Los Angeles Drug’s adverse effects negated when combined with older diabetes drug A drug widely used to treat Type 2 diabetes may have unintended effects on the pancreas that could lead to a form of low-grade pancreatitis in some patients and…

Low-carb diets prove better at controlling type 2 diabetes: Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95 percent of volunteers

2009 study posted for filing Contact: Debbe Geiger Debbe.Geiger@duke.edu 919-660-9461 Duke University Medical Center DURHAM, NC — In a six-month comparison of low-carb diets, one that encourages eating carbohydrates with the lowest-possible rating on the glycemic index leads to greater improvement in blood sugar control, according to Duke University Medical Center researchers. Patients who followed…