Modest Weight loss can lead to Diabetes Remission

Modest Weight loss can lead to Diabetes Remission

Modest Weight loss can lead to Diabetes Remission

The researchers found that 257 participants (30%) participants were in remission at five-year follow-up. People who achieved weight loss of 10% or more within the first five years after diagnosis were more than twice as likely to go into remission compared to people who maintained the same weight.

“We’ve known for some time now that it’s possible to send diabetes into remission using fairly drastic measures such as intensive weight loss programmes and extreme calorie restriction,” says Dr Hajira Dambha-Miller from the Department of Public Health and Primary Care.

H. Dambha‐Miller, A. J. Day, J. Strelitz, G. Irving, S. J. Griffin. Behaviour change, weight loss and remission of Type 2 diabetes: a community‐based prospective cohort study. Diabetic Medicine, 2019; DOI: 10.1111/dme.14122

#diabetes #remission #diet

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dme.14122

Aҫaí berry treated malaria with a 100% survival rate

Aҫaí berry treated malaria with a 100% survival rate

Aҫaí berry treated malaria with a 100% survival rate

All of the mice given polyphenols survived for more than 15 days, whereas none of the untreated mice lived. The aҫaí extracts appeared to interfere with the parasites’ protein homeostasis, or the balance between protein production and degradation, the researchers say.

Letícia T. Ferreira et al. Chemical Genomic Profiling Unveils the in Vitro and in Vivo Antiplasmodial Mechanism of Açaı́ (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) Polyphenols, ACS Omega (2019). DOI: 10.1021/acsomega.9b02127

#malaria #acai #treatment

https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsomega.9b02127

Acai, acai berry, Aҫaí berry, malaria, parasites, extract, cure, treat, survive, Polyphenols, pulp, total phenolic, chabaudi chabaudi, chloroquine-resistant, antimalarial drugs

Vitamin C therapy linked to better survival rates after sepsis

Vitamin C therapy linked to better survival rates after sepsis

Vitamin C therapy linked to better survival rates after sepsis

Researchers discovered that intravenous vitamin C therapy reduced mortality in septic patients from 46% in the placebo group to almost 30% in the vitamin C group at day 28.

On average, the vitamin C group spent three fewer days in the ICU (seven days compared to 10) at day 28 and a week less in the hospital overall (15 days versus 22) by day 60 than the placebo group.

#vitaminc #sepsis #septic

Alpha A. Fowler, Jonathon D. Truwit, R. Duncan Hite, Peter E. Morris, Christine DeWilde, Anna Priday, Bernard Fisher, Leroy R. Thacker, Ramesh Natarajan, Donald F. Brophy, Robin Sculthorpe, Rahul Nanchal, Aamer Syed, Jamie Sturgill, Greg S. Martin, Jonathan Sevransky, Markos Kashiouris, Stella Hamman, Katherine F. Egan, Andrei Hastings, Wendy Spencer, Shawnda Tench, Omar Mehkri, James Bindas, Abhijit Duggal, Jeanette Graf, Stephanie Zellner, Lynda Yanny, Catherine McPolin, Tonya Hollrith, David Kramer, Charles Ojielo, Tessa Damm, Evan Cassity, Aleksandra Wieliczko, Matthew Halquist. Effect of Vitamin C Infusion on Organ Failure and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Vascular Injury in Patients With Sepsis and Severe Acute Respiratory Failure. JAMA, 2019; 322 (13): 1261 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.11825

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2752063

Vitamin c, ascorbic acid, intravenous, survival, treatment, organ, hospital stay, better, Acute respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS, vitamin C infusions, cure, Vascular Injury, lung injury

Strain of common cold virus could revolutionize treatment of bladder cancer

Strain of common cold virus could revolutionize treatment of bladder cancer

A strain of the common cold virus has been found to potentially target, infect and destroy cancer cells in patients with bladder cancer, a new study reports. No trace of the cancer was found in one patient following treatment with the virus.

#bladdercancer #cancer #coldvirus

Nicola E Annels, David Mansfield, Mehreen Arif, Carmen Ballesteros-Merino, Guy R Simpson, Mick Denyer, Sarbjinder S Sandhu, Alan Melcher, Kevin J Harrington, BronwYn Davies, Gough Au, Mark Grose, Izhar N Bagwan, Bernard A. Fox, Richard G Vile, Hugh Mostafid, Darren Shafren, Hardev Pandha. Viral targeting of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer and priming of anti-tumour immunity following intravesical Coxsackievirus A21. Clinical Cancer Research, 2019; clincanres.4022.2018 DOI: 10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-18-4022

http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2019/06/29/1078-0432.CCR-18-4022

Neuropathy Completely Reversed with monounsaturated fats

Neuropathy Completely Reversed with monounsaturated fats

Swapping dietary saturated fats for monounsaturated fats reverses nerve damage and restores nerve function in male mice, finds new preclinical research published in JNeurosci.

Amy E. Rumora, Giovanni LoGrasso, John M. Hayes, Faye E. Mendelson, Maegan A. Tabbey, Julia A. Haidar, Stephen I. Lentz, Eva L. Feldman. The divergent roles of dietary saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids on nerve function in murine models of obesity. The Journal of Neuroscience, 2019; 3173-18 DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3173-18.2019

#nerve #neuropathy #monounsaturated

http://www.jneurosci.org/content/39/19/3770

Bad Breath quickly eliminated by a Ginger compound

Bad Breath quickly eliminated by a Ginger compound

Bad Breath quickly eliminated by a Ginger compound

As the results of this study show, the pungent principle of ginger, the so-called 6-gingerol, makes the level of the enzyme sulfhydryl oxidase 1 in saliva increase 16-fold within a few seconds. The saliva and breath analyses carried out on human volunteers show that the enzyme breaks down malodorous sulfur-containing compounds

Matthias Bader, Theresa Stolle, Maximilian Jennerwein, Jürgen Hauck, Buket Sahin, Thomas Hofmann. Chemosensate-Induced Modulation of the Salivary Proteome and Metabolome Alters the Sensory Perception of Salt Taste and Odor-Active Thiols. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2018; 66 (29): 7740 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.8b02772

Vitamin B12 identified As An Effective Canker Sore Therapy

Vitamin B12 identified As An Effective Canker Sore Therapy

Vitamin B12 identified As An Effective Canker Sore Therapy

The researchers tested the effect of vitamin B12 on 58 randomly selected RAS patients who received either a dose of 1,000 mcg of B12 by mouth at bedtime or a placebo, and were tested monthly for six months. Approximately three quarters (74 percent) of the patients of the treated group and only a third (32 percent) of the control group achieved remission at the end of the study

Volkov et al. Effectiveness of Vitamin B12 in Treating Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, 2009; 22 (1): 9 DOI: 10.3122/jabfm.2009.01.080113

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed with New Beta Cell Implant (Animal Model)

Type 1 Diabetes Reversed with New Beta Cell Implant (Animal Model)

Researchers have successfully created a novel biomaterial that can be seeded with insulin-producing beta cells. Implantation of the beta cell-seeded biomaterial reversed diabetes in a mouse model by effectively normalizing glucose levels and significantly increasing survival.

Paralysis Reversed, neuroprosthetic rehabilitation (Animal Study)

Paralysis Reversed, neuroprosthetic rehabilitation (Animal Study)

Paralysis Reversed, neuroprosthetic rehabilitation (Animal Study)

The therapy triggers the growth of new connections from the motor cortex into the brain stem and from the brain stem into the spinal cord, thus reconnecting the brain with the spinal cord below the injury. — ” after just a few weeks of training, the rats regain extensive control over their hindlimbs – at will”

Citation: Cortico–reticulo–spinal circuit reorganization enables functional recovery after severe spinal cord contusion, Nature Neuroscience (2018). nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0093-5

Herpes Virus Cleared from Cells BX795

Herpes Virus Cleared from Cells BX795

Herpes Virus Cleared from Cells BX795

From a completely accidental discovery: “BX795 is known as an inhibitor of TBK1, an enzyme involved in innate immunity and neuroinflammation. When TBK1 is suppressed in cells, infection is actually promoted. But when the researchers added higher concentrations of BX795 to cultured human corneal cells infected with HSV-1, the infection was quickly cleared.”

Citation: An off-target effect of BX795 blocks herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of the eye. Science Translational Medicine, 2018; 10 (428): eaan5861 DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.aan5861

Total Pain Remission with Cold Open Water Swim

Total Pain Remission with Cold Open Water Swim

A short, sharp, cold water swim may offer an alternative to strong painkillers and physiotherapy to relieve severe persistent pain after surgery, suggest doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

Cold forced open-water swimming: a natural intervention to improve postoperative pain and mobilisation outcomes? BMJ Case Reports 2018; doi:10.1136/bcr-2017-222236

Diabetes reversed in 3 days through diet ( Animal Model)

Diabetes reversed in 3 days through diet ( Animal Model)

Diabetes reversed in 3 days through diet ( Animal Model)

Researchers were able to reverse type 2 Diabetes in just 3 days with a very low calorie diet (animal model). They accomplished this goal while searching for reasons why a VLCDs are so effective in regard to treating type 2 diabetes

Mechanisms by which a Very-Low-Calorie Diet Reverses Hyperglycemia in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes. Cell Metabolism, November 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.cmet.2017.10.004

caloric restriction, very low calorie diet, very-low-calorie diet, type 2 diabetes, T2D, acetyl-CoA, glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, cure, reverse type2 diabetes

Chemotherapys False Expectations : 69 percent of patients with advanced lung cancer and 81 percent of patients with advanced colorectal cancer did not understand that the chemotherapy they were receiving was not at all likely to cure their disease

Advanced Cancer Patients Overoptimistic About Chemotherapy’s Ability to Cure, Study Finds

ScienceDaily (Oct. 24, 2012) — Findings from a nationwide study led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute suggest that patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer are frequently mistaken in their beliefs that chemotherapy can cure their disease.

The study, published in the Oct. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, found that 69 percent of patients with advanced lung cancer and 81 percent of patients with advanced colorectal cancer did not understand that the chemotherapy they were receiving was not at all likely to cure their disease. Their expectations run counter to the fact that although chemotherapy can alleviate pain and extend life in such patients by weeks or months, it is not a cure for these types of advanced cancer except in the rarest of circumstances.

The findings come from the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium (CanCORS), a large nationwide study sponsored by the National Cancer Institute to understand many facets of cancer care in the United States. The study’s lead author is Jane Weeks, MD, MSc, who is the CanCORS Consortium’s scientific chair and is director of the McGraw/Patterson Center for Population Sciences at Dana-Farber, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Harvard School of Public Health.

The study was conducted by surveying 1,274 patients at hospitals, clinics and treatment centers across the country and by undertaking comprehensive review of their records. Study participants had been diagnosed with metastatic lung or colorectal cancer at least four months earlier and had received chemotherapy for their disease.

While previous studies had polled cancer patients about their perceptions of chemotherapy, this was the first to involve such a large and varied cross-section of the population. The study revealed that inaccurate expectations about the role of chemotherapy were found among patients from varied backgrounds treated in many different health care settings across the U.S.

Weeks noted that “If patients do not know whether a treatment offers a realistic possibility of cure, their ability to make informed treatment decisions that are consistent with their preferences may be compromised. This misunderstanding may pose obstacles to optimal end-of-life planning.”

Surprisingly, patients who rated their communication with their physician highly were the most likely to hold overoptimistic views about chemotherapy’s curative potential. While there is no doubt that communication about prognosis in advanced cancer is challenging, a sizeable minority of study participants did grasp the incurable nature of their cancers. Study co-author Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH, said that “skilled clinicians can set realistic expectations without their patients’ losing either hope or trust.” However, further research will be necessary to identify strategies to help physicians more consistently set realistic expectations and thereby help patients make good decisions about their care.

Other study co-authors include Paul Catalano, ScD, Angel Cronin, and Jennifer Mack, MD, MPH, of Dana-Farber; Matthew Finkelman, PhD, of Tufts University; and Nancy Keating, MD, MPH, of Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121024175345.htm

Powerful nutrient cocktail can put kids with Crohn’s into remission

2009 study posted for filing

Contact: George Hunka
ghunka@aftau.org
212-742-9070
American Friends of Tel Aviv University

Tel Aviv University researcher promotes liquid nutrition to combat inflammatory bowel disease

Treating children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) usually involves the same steroids-based medication prescribed to adults. But such treatments can have negative side effects for kids and teens dealing with IBD.

Dr. Raanan Shamir of Tel Aviv University’s Sackler School of Medicine and Schneider Children’s Medical Centre shows that there is another path to treating IBD in children: a nutritional formula that was first developed for astronauts. This supplement puts 60-70% of children with Crohn’s disease, a common IBD disorder, into remission ― a success rate similar to that of traditional steroid-based drugs, but without side effects like malnutrition and growth retardation.

Dr. Shamir recently reported his research in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

Eating Like an Astronaut

Dr. Shamir’s research was inspired by the problem of malnutrition and growth retardation in children battling IBD. Steroids and other biological agents, the most common treatment for IBD, were having an adverse affect on the children’s growth, despite their effectiveness in adult patients.

It was a problem first tackled by NASA: How could astronauts most efficiently get their daily nutrients? The answer was a specially-designed powder that contains all the daily nutrients a person needs. Aboard spacecrafts, astronauts dine on this nutritional powder mixed with water. Since then, these powders have become a common item on the pharmacy shelf.

A similar concept works wonders for children suffering from IBD. “Prepared powder, with liquids, gives you all the nutritional requirements you need for the day,” Dr. Shamir explains. “We don’t know why these formulas work, and nobody has shown that any one formula is preferable to another. People have to be committed and eat nothing else during the period of time they are on nutrition therapy, and it is difficult to do ― but if they do it, they go into remission.”

To induce remission, children need to be on nutrition therapy for 6-8 weeks. And in order to maintain remission, 25-50% of their caloric intake must be supplied by nutrition therapy, sometimes for years. This is why children experiencing the treatment need the support of physicians, dieticians, psychologists, and of course their families.

Dr. Shamir’s quest to educate the international medical community about the benefits of nutrition therapy has been an uphill battle. “The acceptance of this is difficult,” he says. “You have to persuade the family. Not all physicians know it works, and it’s much easier to give someone a prescription than try to work with the child.”

A Replacement for Steroids

“In adults, studies have shown that steroids are more effective in the battle against IBD than nutrition-based therapies. I think it is easier to get compliance from children, especially when it involves their growth. For adults, growth is not a concern ― they just want to feel better,” explains Dr. Shamir.

Dr. Shamir and his team of researchers have worked to show the international medical community that nutrition was equal to steroids in the treatment of children with IBD. “We published the most recent meta-analysis to show that nutrition is as good as steroids as a first-line therapy for Crohn’s disease,” he says.

The next step in his research, says Dr. Shamir, is to “define exactly the role of nutrition in inducing remission in these patients, and the role of nutrition in maintaining remission.”

 

###

 

American Friends of Tel Aviv University (www.aftau.org) supports Israel’s leading and most comprehensive center of higher learning. In independent rankings, TAU’s innovations and discoveries are cited more often by the global scientific community than all but 20 other universities worldwide. Internationally recognized for the scope and groundbreaking nature of its research programs, Tel Aviv University consistently produces work with profound implications for the future.