Muscle Mass and Vitamin C

“We know that Vitamin C consumption is linked with skeletal muscle mass. It helps defend the cells and tissues that make up the body from potentially harmful free radical substances. Unopposed these free radicals can contribute to the destruction of muscle, thus speeding up age-related decline.”

#vitaminc #muscle #skeletalmuscle

  1. Lucy N Lewis, Richard P G Hayhoe, Angela A Mulligan, Robert N Luben, Kay-Tee Khaw, Ailsa A Welch. Lower Dietary and Circulating Vitamin C in Middle- and Older-Aged Men and Women Are Associated with Lower Estimated Skeletal Muscle Mass. The Journal of Nutrition, 2020; DOI: 10.1093/jn/nxaa221

https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/150/10/2789/5897318

sarcopenia, skeletal muscle, frailty, vitamin C, ascorbic acid, muscle mass, muscle loss, aging, gain muscle, muscle growth, body mass index, diet ,frailty, skeletal muscles, plasma, ascorbic acid, sarcopenia, calcium ascorbate,

Psoriasis Corrected in stem cell cultures with Vitamin C

Psoriasis Corrected in stem cell cultures with Vitamin C

Psoriasis Corrected in stem cell cultures with Vitamin C

Lian and Murphy have previously shown that 5-hmC loss in the skin epigenome can be reprogrammed using agents as fundamental as ascorbic acid (vitamin C). They reasoned that therapeutic correction of the epigenomic defect in psoriasis might reverse the entire process. Based on experiments using skin stem cell cultures in the lab, the team presents promising preliminary data suggesting that 5-hmC levels can be restored to correct the deficiency seen in psoriasis.

Loss of the Epigenetic Mark, 5-hmC, in Psoriasis: Implications for Epidermal Stem Cell Dysregulation Li, Feng et al. Journal of Investigative Dermatology DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2019.10.016

https://www.jidonline.org/article/S0022-202X(19)33467-0/abstract

#psoriasis #vitaminc #ascorbicacid

Psoriasis, vitaminc, ascorbicacid, stemcells, 5-hmc, corrected, treated, reversed, stem cell, vitamin c, ascorbic acid, keratinocyte, 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, treatment

Vitamin C therapy linked to better survival rates after sepsis

Vitamin C therapy linked to better survival rates after sepsis

Vitamin C therapy linked to better survival rates after sepsis

Researchers discovered that intravenous vitamin C therapy reduced mortality in septic patients from 46% in the placebo group to almost 30% in the vitamin C group at day 28.

On average, the vitamin C group spent three fewer days in the ICU (seven days compared to 10) at day 28 and a week less in the hospital overall (15 days versus 22) by day 60 than the placebo group.

#vitaminc #sepsis #septic

Alpha A. Fowler, Jonathon D. Truwit, R. Duncan Hite, Peter E. Morris, Christine DeWilde, Anna Priday, Bernard Fisher, Leroy R. Thacker, Ramesh Natarajan, Donald F. Brophy, Robin Sculthorpe, Rahul Nanchal, Aamer Syed, Jamie Sturgill, Greg S. Martin, Jonathan Sevransky, Markos Kashiouris, Stella Hamman, Katherine F. Egan, Andrei Hastings, Wendy Spencer, Shawnda Tench, Omar Mehkri, James Bindas, Abhijit Duggal, Jeanette Graf, Stephanie Zellner, Lynda Yanny, Catherine McPolin, Tonya Hollrith, David Kramer, Charles Ojielo, Tessa Damm, Evan Cassity, Aleksandra Wieliczko, Matthew Halquist. Effect of Vitamin C Infusion on Organ Failure and Biomarkers of Inflammation and Vascular Injury in Patients With Sepsis and Severe Acute Respiratory Failure. JAMA, 2019; 322 (13): 1261 DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.11825

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2752063

Vitamin c, ascorbic acid, intravenous, survival, treatment, organ, hospital stay, better, Acute respiratory distress syndrome, ARDS, vitamin C infusions, cure, Vascular Injury, lung injury

Vitamin C injections slow tumor growth in mice

Repost 2008

Contact: Joan Chamberlain niddkmedia@mail.nih.gov 301-496-3583 NIH/National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

High-dose injections of vitamin C, also known as ascorbate or ascorbic acid, reduced tumor weight and growth rate by about 50 percent in mouse models of brain, ovarian, and pancreatic cancers, researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) report in the August 5, 2008, issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  The researchers traced ascorbate’s anti-cancer effect to the formation of hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular fluid surrounding the tumors.  Normal cells were unaffected.

Natural physiologic controls precisely regulate the amount of ascorbate absorbed by the body when it is taken orally.  “When you eat foods containing more than 200 milligrams of vitamin C a day–for example, 2 oranges and a serving of broccoli–your body prevents blood levels of ascorbate from exceeding a narrow range,” says Mark Levine, M.D., the study’s lead author and chief of the Molecular and Clinical Nutrition Section of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the NIH.  To bypass these normal controls, NIH scientists injected ascorbate into the veins or abdominal cavities of rodents with aggressive brain, ovarian, and pancreatic tumors.  By doing so, they were able to deliver high doses of ascorbate, up to 4 grams per kilogram of body weight daily.  “At these high injected doses, we hoped to see drug-like activity that might be useful in cancer treatment,” said Levine.

Vitamin C plays a critical role in health, and a prolonged deficiency leads to scurvy and eventually to death.  Some proteins known as enzymes, which have vital biochemical functions, require the vitamin to work properly.  Vitamin C may also act as an antioxidant, protecting cells from the damaging effects of free radicals.  The NIH researchers, however, tested the idea that ascorbate, when injected at high doses, may have prooxidant instead of antioxidant activity.  Prooxidants would generate free radicals and the formation of hydrogen peroxide, which, the scientists hypothesized, might kill tumor cells.  In their laboratory experiments on 43 cancer and 5 normal cell lines, the researchers discovered that high concentrations of ascorbate had anticancer effects in 75 percent of cancer cell lines tested, while sparing normal cells.  In their paper, the researchers also showed that these high ascorbate concentrations could be achieved in people.

The team then tested ascorbate injections in immune-deficient mice with rapidly spreading ovarian, pancreatic, and glioblastoma (brain) tumors.  The ascorbate injections reduced tumor growth and weight by 41 to 53 percent.  In 30 percent of glioblastoma controls, the cancer had spread to other organs, but the ascorbate-treated animals had no signs of disseminated cancer.  “These pre-clinical data provide the first firm basis for advancing pharmacologic ascorbate in cancer treatment in humans,” the researchers conclude.

Interest in vitamin C as a potential cancer therapy peaked about 30 years ago when case series data showed a possible benefit.  In 1979 and 1985, however, other researchers reported no benefit for cancer patients taking high oral doses of vitamin C in two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials.

Several observations led the NIH researchers to revisit ascorbate as a cancer therapy.  “Clinical and pharmacokinetic studies conducted in the past 12 years showed that oral ascorbate levels in plasma and tissue are tightly controlled.  In the case series, ascorbate was given orally and intravenously, but in the trials ascorbate was just given orally.  It was not realized at the time that only injected ascorbate might deliver the concentrations needed to see an anti-tumor effect,” said Levine, who noted that new clinical trials of ascorbate as a cancer treatment are in the planning stages.

Data from Levine’s earlier studies of the regulation and absorption of dietary vitamin C were used in the revision of the Institute of Medicine’s Recommended Dietary Allowance for the vitamin in 2000.  In the current study, Levine led a team of scientists from the NIDDK and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), both components of the NIH, as well as the University of Kansas.  “NIH’s unique translational environment, where researchers can pursue intellectual high-risk, out-of-the-box thinking with high potential payoff, enabled us to pursue this work,” he said.

###

For more information about cancer, please visit the NCI website at www.cancer.gov, or call NCI’s Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237).

The NIDDK conducts and supports research in diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases.  Spanning the full spectrum of medicine and afflicting people of all ages and ethnic groups, these diseases encompass some of the most common, severe, and disabling conditions affecting Americans. For more information about NIDDK and its programs, see www.niddk.nih.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation’s Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases.  For more information about NIH and its programs, see www.nih.gov.

Vitamin C: A potential life-saving treatment for sepsis

Contact: Kathy Wallis kwallis3@uwo.ca 519-661-2111 x81136 University of Western Ontario

Vitamin C: A potential life-saving treatment for sepsis

Physicians caring for patients with sepsis may soon have a new safe and cost-effective treatment for this life-threatening illness.  Research led by Dr. Karel Tyml and his colleagues at The University of Western Ontario and Lawson Health Research Institute have found that vitamin C can not only prevent the onset of sepsis, but can reverse the disease.

Sepsis is caused by a bacterial infection that can begin anywhere in your body.  Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from the disease.

According to Dr. Tyml, a professor at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, patients with severe sepsis have a high mortality rate, nearly 40 percent, because there is no effective treatment.

“There are many facets to sepsis, but the one we have focused on for the past 10 years is the plugging of capillaries,” says Dr. Tyml.  Plugged capillaries prevent oxygenation and the supply of life-supporting materials to your organ tissue and stop the removal of metabolic waste product.  Plugged capillaries are seen in organs of septic patients.  These organs may eventually fail, leading to multiple organ failure and death.  Dr. Tyml’s lab was the first to discover this plugging by using intravital microscopy, a technique Dr. Tyml pioneered in Canada.

According to Dr. Tyml’s most recent publication, oxidative stress and the activated blood clotting pathway are the major factors responsible for the capillary plugging in sepsis. Through his research, Dr. Tyml has discovered that a single bolus of vitamin C injected early at the time of induction of sepsis, prevents capillary plugging.  He has also found that a delayed bolus injection of vitamin C can reverse plugging by restoring blood flow in previously plugged capillaries.

“Our research in mice with sepsis has found that early as well as delayed injections of vitamin C improves chance of survival significantly,” explains Dr. Tyml.  “Furthermore, the beneficial effect of a single bolus injection of vitamin C is long lasting and prevents capillary plugging for up to 24 hours post-injection.”

Dr. Tyml and his colleagues are eager to find appropriate support to move this research from the bench to the bedside to see if these findings translate to patients with sepsis.

The potential benefit of this treatment is substantial.  “Vitamin C is cheap and safe. Previous studies have shown that it can be injected intravenously into patients with no side effects,” says Dr. Tyml.  “It has the potential to significantly improve the outcome of sepsis patients world-wide.  This could be especially beneficially in developing countries where sepsis is more common and expensive treatments are not affordable.”

* Reposted for Category Submission

Sepsis: Blood Poisoning Kills Thousands, But No Drugs to Help / Vitamin C: A potential life-saving treatment for sepsis

Rory Staunton’s death started with a simple cut on his arm.

Rory, a 12-year-old New Yorker, cut himself when he dove for a basketball at his school gym in late March, according to the New York Times. Two days later, he was vomiting, feverish and had a pain in his leg. A few days later, on April 1, Rory died at NYU-Langone Medical Center of a kind of blood poisoning known as sepsis.

His death, and others, point to a major problem in treating sepsis — there are currently no drugs approved to fight it. The only drug developed for it, called Xigris, was withdrawn from the market in 2011, when the drug failed rigorous testing required to maintain regulatory approval. The drug’s fall from grace highlights just how difficult fighting sepsis is, and leaves doctors wondering whether developing a drug will ever be possible.

Bleak Prognosis, Then Brief Promise

About 750,000 people in the U.S. each year get sepsis, and about 225,000 of them die from it. The condition is an infection of the bloodstream, and it can arise from any number of infectious bugs that attack the body, such as meningitis, pneumonia and infections of the skin or bladder, to name a few. The blood poisoning is caused not by the germs themselves, but by the body’s hyper-response to those germs, when it releases a barrage of chemicals that can lead to organ failure.

Those chemicals cause the body to go into shock, and patients have symptoms such as chills, fever, confusion, rapid heartbeat, headache and skin rashes.

The best shot patients have is for doctors to treat them early, ideally giving a patient antibiotics and fluids within the first hour that they show symptoms. Dr. Andre Kalil, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, said even in the best-case scenario, antibiotics don’t always help.

“Unfortunately even with the best antibiotics and supportive care, a third of these patients will die,” Kalil said. “We don’t have other drugs that actually can act in the body in response to the infection. We just don’t.”

That wasn’t always in the case. In 2001 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xigris, made by the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly, hopes were high that it would keep thousands of patients from dying. The company’s initial clinical trials of the drug showed that it reduced the chances of dying by 20 percent in patients at risk of developing sepsis.

But the drug’s initial performance was somewhat disappointing. Some patients benefited from the drug, others did not, and doctors had trouble defining which type of patient would benefit the most. The drug was also very expensive, so many hospitals put protocols in place that strictly limited when the drug could be given — usually when all other methods had failed.

Dr. Jonathan Janes, medical director of acute care for Eli Lilly, said the company was encouraged by studies of the drug in real-life clinical settings, which showed that it kept many patients alive.

“We felt encouraged by those results, they seemed to support that the drug worked,” Janes said. “Obviously, you need your clinical trial data, but these results were nice to have.”

But questions about the drug’s effectiveness and safety began to surface. Patients getting Xigris had a slightly increased risk of bleeding. Increasingly skeptical that the expensive drug was actually effective, European regulators asked Eli Lilly to conduct a second clinical trial. The results were the nail in Xigris’ coffin — the trial showed that the drug was little better than placebo. Based on those results, Eli Lilly voluntarily pulled the drug from the market in October 2011.

“This was the first drug specifically licensed for sepsis, which leaves us essentially with nothing now,” said Dr. Greg Martin, director of the medical and coronary intensive care units at Emory University.

Drug’s Withdrawal A Premature Decision, Some Say

But a new analysis, published Monday in the journal Lancet Infectious Diseases, throws into question whether or not Xigris should have been withdrawn at all. In it, Nebraska’s Kalil analyzed the results of more than two dozen studies of Xigris, most performed in the “real-world” of clinics and hospitals, trying to save patients with sepsis.

The results suggest that Xigris is effective after all. The study found that Xigris reduced patients’ risk of dying by 18 percent, similar to the results Eli Lilly had reported in its first study of the drug.

“I was expecting to see a very small effect, close to no effect. I was surprised when we saw these kinds of results,” Kalil said.

So should the drug be put back on the market? The answer is uncertain and, as far as Eli Lilly is concerned, unfeasible. Putting the drug back on the market would mean conducting another long, expensive clinical trial to clear regulatory hurdles. Janes said the company has no plans to do that, even in the face of evidence suggesting the drug’s effectiveness.

“We have to live with the results of our clinical trials,” Janes said. “It goes back to the point of deciding what the company is going to invest in.”

Although the drug would likely help hundreds of thousands of patients, it will likely never be as profitable as drugs that can help millions of patients with more common conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes or cancer.

And questions remain about whether the drug was ever truly helpful for patients. Doctors never really identified the type of patient who would benefit the most from Xigris. The new study suggests that perhaps only the sickest patients really improve after taking the drug. Trials of the drug in pediatric patients like Rory never succeeded.

Dr. Cliff Deutschman, a professor of anesthesiology and critical care at the University of Pennsylvania, said he was never really convinced that the drug was better than treating patients with antibiotics and fluids.

“Ultimately, it’s pretty hard to know what to make of the results of these studies,” he said.

Since Xigris was introduced and withdrawn, doctors and hospitals also seem to have gotten a little better at screening and stopping sepsis in its early stages. Programs like the Stop Sepsis campaign, a program started by the Greater New York Hospital Association, emphasize promoting awareness of the condition and the critical importance of getting care to patients in the first hours of their symptoms.

But many doctors say a drug like Xigris would be invaluable in saving the lives of hundreds of thousands of patients. Martin said he still believes Xigris could be that drug.

“There’s real potential that this drug has the ability to treat and cure people. But we don’t know who the drug works best in, and that’s probably where the interest was lost,” Martin said.

And for now, it seems that doctors will never know. Since Eli Lilly withdrew the drug from the market, it is no longer available even for research purposes.

Deutschman said the biggest blow is that given the Xigris’s failure and Eli Lilly’s experience, other pharmaceutical companies will be reluctant to spend the money to pursue any treatment for sepsis. For now, the scientific and regulatory bar for a drug is very high.

“There still may be groups of people that it [Xigris] does work on, but because the drug is no longer available we’ll never know. And that’s discouraging,” he said.

Vitamin C: A potential life-saving treatment for sepsis

Public release date: 17-Nov-2010

Physicians caring for patients with sepsis may soon have a new safe and cost-effective treatment for this life-threatening illness.  Research led by Dr. Karel Tyml and his colleagues at The University of Western Ontario and Lawson Health Research Institute have found that vitamin C can not only prevent the onset of sepsis, but can reverse the disease.

Sepsis is caused by a bacterial infection that can begin anywhere in your body.  Your immune system goes into overdrive, overwhelming normal processes in your blood. The result is that small blood clots form, blocking blood flow to vital organs. This can lead to organ failure. Babies, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems are most likely to get sepsis. But even healthy people can become deathly ill from the disease.

According to Dr. Tyml, a professor at Western’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, patients with severe sepsis have a high mortality rate, nearly 40 percent, because there is no effective treatment.

“There are many facets to sepsis, but the one we have focused on for the past 10 years is the plugging of capillaries,” says Dr. Tyml.  Plugged capillaries prevent oxygenation and the supply of life-supporting materials to your organ tissue and stop the removal of metabolic waste product.  Plugged capillaries are seen in organs of septic patients.  These organs may eventually fail, leading to multiple organ failure and death.  Dr. Tyml’s lab was the first to discover this plugging by using intravital microscopy, a technique Dr. Tyml pioneered in Canada.

According to Dr. Tyml’s most recent publication, oxidative stress and the activated blood clotting pathway are the major factors responsible for the capillary plugging in sepsis. Through his research, Dr. Tyml has discovered that a single bolus of vitamin C injected early at the time of induction of sepsis, prevents capillary plugging.  He has also found that a delayed bolus injection of vitamin C can reverse plugging by restoring blood flow in previously plugged capillaries.

“Our research in mice with sepsis has found that early as well as delayed injections of vitamin C improves chance of survival significantly,” explains Dr. Tyml.  “Furthermore, the beneficial effect of a single bolus injection of vitamin C is long lasting and prevents capillary plugging for up to 24 hours post-injection.”

Dr. Tyml and his colleagues are eager to find appropriate support to move this research from the bench to the bedside to see if these findings translate to patients with sepsis.

The potential benefit of this treatment is substantial.  “Vitamin C is cheap and safe. Previous studies have shown that it can be injected intravenously into patients with no side effects,” says Dr. Tyml.  “It has the potential to significantly improve the outcome of sepsis patients world-wide.  This could be especially beneficially in developing countries where sepsis is more common and expensive treatments are not affordable.”