Autism-Vaccine Cover-up Snowballs as Whistleblower’s Identity is Revealed—LATEST UPDATES

William W. Thompson, PhD—an epidemiologist at the CDC’s National Center of Birth Defects and Development Disabilities is alleging criminal wrongdoing on the part of his supervisors, and has expressed deep regret about his role in helping the CDC hide data: “It’s the lowest point in my career, that I went along with that paper.”

 

Posted By ANH-USA On August 26, 2014 @ 3:00 pm

Rumors are swirling as the world learns of the government’s deception. Here’s what we know for sure.

William W. Thompson, PhD—an epidemiologist at the CDC’s National Center of Birth Defects and Development Disabilities who received his doctorate in biochemical engineering—has been revealed as the CDC whistleblower. Thompson broke a decade of silence over the government’s deliberate concealment of the link between the MMR vaccine (for measles, mumps, and rubella) and a dramatically increased risk of autism, particularly in African American boys.

Thompson is alleging criminal wrongdoing on the part of his supervisors, and has expressed deep regret about his role in helping the CDC hide data: “It’s the lowest point in my career, that I went along with that paper.”

Here is a quick timeline of the scandal:

English: Preparation of measles vaccine at the...

Continue reading “Autism-Vaccine Cover-up Snowballs as Whistleblower’s Identity is Revealed—LATEST UPDATES”

U.S. Court Confrims M.M.R. Vaccine Caused Autism or Cumulative (Verified through Multiple Sources) From DEC 2012 Judgment

EEV: Court Document Clip: Followed by links to Last article from Jan 2013 and links to court documents

* This was requested article research

National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (“Vaccine Program”).2 Petitioners
alleged that as a result of “all the vaccinations administered to [Ryan] from March 25,
2003, through February 22, 2005, and more specifically, measles-mumps-rubella (MMR)
vaccinations administered to him on December 19, 2003 and May 10, 2004,” Ryan
suffered “a severe and debilitating injury to his brain, described as Autism Spectrum
Disorder (‘ASD’).” Petition at 1. Petitioners specifically asserted that Ryan “suffered a
Vaccine Table Injury, namely, an encephalopathy” as a result of his receipt of the MMR
vaccination on December 19, 2003. Id. In the alternative, petitioners asserted that “as a
cumulative result of his receipt of each and every vaccination between March 25, 2003
and February 22, 2005, Ryan has suffered . . . neuroimmunologically mediated
dysfunctions in the form of asthma and ASD.” Id. at 1-2.

CAMPBELL-SMITH.MOJABI-PROFFER.12.13.2012

RyanvHHSMMR[1]Measles Judgement

American parents awarded £600,000 in compensation after their son developed  autism as a result of MMR vaccine

  • Saeid and  Parivash Mojabi claimed their son suffered a ‘severe brain injury’
  • The  Californian couple said that son Ryan was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum  Disorder

By  David Gardner

PUBLISHED: 20:32 EST, 14  January 2013 |  UPDATED: 20:33 EST, 14 January 2013

Vaccine: An American couple have been awarded more than £600,000 by a U.S court after claiming their son developed autism as a result of the MMR jab (file picture)
Vaccine: An American couple have been awarded more than  £600,000 by a U.S court after claiming their son developed autism as a result of  the MMR jab (file picture)

Parents who claim their 10-year-old boy  developed autism as a result of being injected with an MMR vaccine when he was a  baby have been awarded more than £600,000 in a landmark court decision in  America.

Saeid and Parivash Mojabi claimed that son  Ryan suffered a ‘severe and debilitating injury to his brain’ after being  administered with two measles-mumps-rubella vaccinations in December, 2003 and  in May the following year.

They said in court papers that Ryan was  diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

The ruling comes months after a judge in  Italy awarded £140,000 to an Italian couple who said their son had autism after  his routine childhood MMR inoculation.

The American decision – although it doesn’t  lay fault for the child’s disability with the drug – fuels anti-MMR campaigners  challenging the view of the majority of the medical profession that holds the  vaccinations are safe.

The claim was against the US government which  set up a Vaccine Programme. Although a judgement rules whether or not each case  is eligible for compensation and the amount – in this case against the US Health  Department – it does not apportion blame.

The San Jose, California, based family took  their case to the US Court of Federal Claims in 2006.

Under the National Vaccine Injury  Compensation Programme, parents can petition the US government for compensation  for injuries or deaths allegedly caused by compulsory childhood  vaccines.

A judgement in Ryan’s case, which was first  filed in 2006, was made on December 13 last year by the Office of Special  Masters set up by US Congress to decide on compensation claims. The defendant in  the case was the US Secretary of Health and Human Services.

The damages payment takes into account the  boy’s future loss of earnings because it’s unlikely he will be able to  work.

In statements to the court, Ryan’s  grandmother Paravaneh Shah-Mohammadi and his aunt Pooran Vahabi told how the boy  appeared ‘lethargic’, ‘hardly responsive to noises and people around him,’and  ‘unable to hold himself upright’ after having the first MMR  vaccination.

Under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Programme, parents can petition the US government for compensation for injuries or deaths allegedly caused by compulsory childhood vaccinesUnder the National Vaccine Injury Compensation  Programme, parents can petition the US government for compensation for injuries  or deaths allegedly caused by compulsory childhood vaccines (file  picture)

The number of autism cases in the UK has  soared over the past four decades. At the last count researchers found one in 64  British children have some kind of autistic condition.

In the Eighties, only four in every 10,000  children showed any signs of autism.

The Department of Health and NHS doctors  insist that better diagnosis of autism and environmental factors are responsible  for the dramatic rise in the number of cases and dismissed MMR vaccinations as a  cause.

No link between the jabs and autism has been  found in the British courts.

In America, nearly 5,000 families blame the  MMR injection for causing their children’s autism.

Boost: The case is likely to fuel the arguments of anti-MMR campaigners (file picture)Boost: The case is likely to fuel the arguments of  anti-MMR campaigners (file picture)

In 2008, a girl called Hannah Poling was  awarded £1 million damages by the US government when a court ruled that  receiving nine vaccines in one day, including the MMR, had caused her autistic  condition.

But the court said that Hannah had an  underlying cell disorder, mitochondria, which had been aggravated by the  vaccinations and manifested itself as autism.

In Ryan’s case, Chief Special Master Patricia  Campbell-Smith decided his family was eligible for damages under the US  government’s Vaccine Programme.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2262534/American-parents-awarded-600-000-compensation-son-developed-autism-result-MMR-vaccine.html#ixzz2bPIwE6WR Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Is Jenny McCarthy the most dangerous woman on US television? – The continuation of an orchestrated campaign

EEV: We support the freedom of choice, We Support Jenny McCarthy. All because something it deemed the title vaccine, does not mean the benefit will always outweigh for the risk. We support ABC for their decision.

 

 

Yes, if you think it’s wrong to give a woman who campaigns against child vaccinations a spot on America’s top daytime talk show

David Usborne

Friday, 19 July 2013

Owned by Disney, the ABC Network might have wanted to burnish its family-friendly credentials as it scoured the land for a new co-host for its all-female daytime talk show, The View.

Surprisingly, perhaps, they plumped this week for Jenny McCarthy, onetime Playboy cover girl, sex author and comedienne.

But this hardly gives McCarthy, now 40, her due. She is also outspoken on family health and has made the case, with a book, TV appearances and on the lecture circuit, that vaccinating infants is not without risk.

It is her campaigning on this issue which has led some commentators and medical professionals to describe McCarthy as “dangerous”. Equally harsh words are now being directed towards the network that hired her. James Poniewozik, Time magazine’s TV critic, said ABC’s decision to put McCarthy on The View was “irresponsible and shameful” and would “legitimise [her] dangerous anti-science” views. Alex Pareene, a writer for Slate, went further, saying the decision would “kill children”.

McCarthy is mightily telegenic. She’s also articulate, she talks directly to young mothers and she’s controversial. The perennially popular talk show and its creator and current (but soon to retire) chief host, Barbara Walters, must have thought they had found themselves the golden ticket. But who in their right mind would deny their offspring proven protection against potentially fatal diseases like mumps and measles? As many people watch The View as live in Iowa. That’s a big audience and it tunes in every day. Could it be that McCarthy is set to become the most dangerous person on American television?

Her foray into medical scholarship followed the birth of her son, Evan, in 2002 and a subsequent diagnosis of autism. Any parent confronted with that sort of crisis is entitled to speculate on its source. But she described the tie between vaccinations and autism as fact and used her fame to peddle it, partly through her book, Mother Warrior. Her then partner, the actor Jim Carrey, lent his voice to her anti-inoculation quest. She has said latterly that Evan has since overcome his autism, in part by good diet choices.

The idea that autism might be caused by vaccines – specifically the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine – was not new, having been mooted notably by a British gastroenterologist, Andrew Wakefield, in 1998. But the paediatric community widely debunked the theory and has blamed McCarthy for scaring parents in the US into depriving children of life-saving protection. Some implicate her in a whooping cough outbreak in California in 2010, the worst in 40 years, that killed 10. A website, http://www.jennymccarthybodycount.com, tracks with a digital counter the number of preventable deaths among non-immunised youngsters.

“Her information, at least when it comes to vaccines, is absolutely baseless,” Dr Edgar Marcuse, a professor of paediatrics and epidemiology at the University of Washington in Seattle, noted last week. “It has no scientific support whatsoever.”

The impact of the autism-vaccination claims were notably dissected in The Panic Virus, an award-winning book by Seth Mnookin published in 2011. The author focuses first on Dr Wakefield but dedicates a chapter to McCarthy, whom he accuses of having “worked methodically and relentlessly to undermine public health”. Last week he observed: “In this country, certainly she is the single most important figure in popularising this notion that vaccines are dangerous and could potentially cause autism.”

Could it be that this casting choice will come back to haunt Walters, who means herself to retire from television entirely next summer?

The growing pressure on her to change her mind would suggest so. Letters of protest have swamped ABC headquarters in New York City, including one from Every Child by Two, which runs its own campaign to ensure parents are not tempted to skimp on infant vaccinations.

“McCarthy’s unfounded claims that vaccines cause autism have been one of the greatest impediments to public health in recent decades,” it said. “These false assertions… have spread fear among young parents, which has led to an increased number of children who have not received lifesaving vaccines.”

Critics are particularly concerned because young women make up such a large share of The View’s daily audience. “While Jenny cannot deliver direct medical advice, she is definitely influencing many young mothers as to what is ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ in terms of childcare and immunisations,” Dr Shilpi Agarwal, a family doctor, told Fox News.

“I suspect she will get a lot of pushback, which may be exactly what a show like The View wants.” Maybe so, but it may not be the kind of legacy the retiring Walters wants.

Jenny McCarthy: In her own words

“Let me see if I can put this in scientific terms: think of autism like a fart, and vaccines are the finger you pull to make it happen.”

“The reason why [the medical community] is reluctant to talk about it is because there’s such a huge business in pharmaceuticals.”

– Speaking to CNN in November  last year.

“If you ask a parent of an autistic child if they want the measles or the autism, we will stand in line for the measles.”

– To Time in February 2010

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/is-jenny-mccarthy-the-most-dangerous-woman-on-us-television-8721232.html#

MMR scare doctor Andrew Wakefield breaks his silence: Measles outbreak in Wales proves I was right

As measles cases rise, experts condemn Wakefield’s outburst

Jeremy Laurance

Saturday, 13 April 2013

The discredited doctor who triggered the MMR scare 15 years ago has pinned the blame for the outbreak of measles in south Wales on the Government.

In an extraordinary intervention, Andrew Wakefield, who was struck off the medical register, said the “British Government is entirely culpable” for the outbreak and accused officials of “putting price before children’s health” – despite a widespread consensus that it was the panic over his flawed research that led to the surge in the disease.

The number of measles cases in the Swansea area rose to 693 on Thursday. It is now the largest outbreak in the country for over a decade, exceeding the 622 cases recorded in Merseyside in 2012.

Public Health Wales warned that the outbreak was unlikely to peak for “two to three” weeks because of the incubation period for measles. Children return to school after the Easter holiday on Monday and will begin mixing with a wider group of their peers, which could accelerate the spread of the disease.

Health officials urged parents to take their children to one of the drop-in vaccination clinics set up in the wake of the outbreak.

They say at least 6,000 people remain unprotected in south-west Wales and it is only a matter of time before a child develops serious complications as a result.

Dr Wakefield was the chief author of the now infamous and discredited 1998 Lancet paper that first linked the MMR vaccine with bowel disease and autism. In a statement posted on Thursday on  the US website Age of Autism, he blamed the rise in measles in the UK on the Government’s decision to withdraw import licences for single vaccines in September 1998, six months after the Lancet paper appeared.

He said the Government was more interested in protecting the MMR programme than protecting children and challenged “any serious defender of MMR vaccine safety” to a debate on live television.

He had recommended the use of single measles vaccine at the press conference to launch the Lancet paper and said that “remains my position”.

But when, in 1998, he asked the UK Health Protection Agency why the import licences for single vaccines had been revoked he says he was told that allowing parents the choice would “destroy our MMR programme”.

“The Government’s concern appeared to be to protect the MMR programme over and above the protection of children,” he claims.

He accused officials of having approved “dangerous” brands of MMR vaccine a decade earlier in 1988, when the vaccine was first launched in the UK, which later had to be withdrawn because they “caused meningitis”.

“These government officials put price before children’s health and have been seeking to cover up this shameful fact ever since.”

He cites cases in the courts in the US and Italy where families of children suffering autism have won damages worth hundreds of thousands of dollars after judges accepted the children had suffered “vaccine-induced brain damage”.

Adam Finn, professor of paediatrics at the University of Bristol and an expert on childhood vaccines described Dr Wakefield’s claims as “balderdash”.

“His proposal for single vaccines was not based on any observations in his published paper. It came straight out of his head. There has never been any evidence it would have made any difference.

“There were, however, real concerns that sticking more needles in children was unkind, fewer children would show up for each round and they would face delays in getting protected. Single measles vaccine is only used in poorer countries that cannot afford MMR. No country in the world has switched from MMR to single vaccines.”

Professor Finn said there had been a problem in the early years of MMR with one strain of the mumps virus used in the vaccine causing a transient form of aseptic meningitis. The make-up of the vaccine was changed, but the facts were well known and had not been covered up.

In relation to the court cases, he said it was important not to confuse principles of justice with the principles of science.

“Judges look at the case in front of them and make a judgement as best they can. They don’t do it in a systematic way as scientists do.”

In 2010, The Lancet retracted Dr Wakefield’s research paper and he was struck off the medical register by the General Medical Council.

The GMC verdict found that he had acted “dishonestly and irresponsibly”, showed “callous disregard for children’s suffering” and betrayed patients’ trust.

But the affair sparked a media storm which saw vaccination rates plummet, hundreds of thousands of children left unprotected, and measles cases soar.

Dr Wakefield moved to Texas, US, in 2001 where he is director of Medical Interventions for Autism and in January was promoting a reality TV series on autism.

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/mmr-scare-doctor-andrew-wakefield-breaks-his-silence-measles-outbreak-in-wales-proves-i-was-right-8570594.html#

Insight: Evidence grows for narcolepsy link to GSK swine flu shot : Doctors are fearful of having their reputations ruined by reporting possible links

By Kate Kelland, Health and Science Correspondent | Reuters – 8 mins ago

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Emelie is plagued by hallucinations and nightmares. When she wakes up, she’s often paralyzed, unable to breathe properly or call for help. During the day she can barely stay awake, and often misses school or having fun with friends. She is only 14, but at times she has wondered if her life is worth living.

Emelie is one of around 800 children in Sweden and elsewhere in Europe who developed narcolepsy, an incurable sleep disorder, after being immunized with the Pandemrix H1N1 swine flu vaccine made by British drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline in 2009.

Finland, Norway, Ireland and France have seen spikes in narcolepsy cases, too, and people familiar with the results of a soon-to-be-published study in Britain have told Reuters it will show a similar pattern in children there.

Their fate, coping with an illness that all but destroys normal life, is developing into what the health official who coordinated Sweden’s vaccination campaign calls a “medical tragedy” that will demand rising scientific and medical attention.

Europe’s drugs regulator has ruled Pandemrix should no longer be used in people aged under 20. The chief medical officer at GSK’s vaccines division, Norman Begg, says his firm views the issue extremely seriously and is “absolutely committed to getting to the bottom of this”, but adds there is not yet enough data or evidence to suggest a causal link.

Others – including Emmanuel Mignot, one of the world’s leading experts on narcolepsy, who is being funded by GSK to investigate further – agree more research is needed but say the evidence is already clearly pointing in one direction.

“There’s no doubt in my mind whatsoever that Pandemrix increased the occurrence of narcolepsy onset in children in some countries – and probably in most countries,” says Mignot, a specialist in the sleep disorder at Stanford University in the United States.

30 MILLION RECEIVED PANDEMRIX

In total, the GSK shot was given to more than 30 million people in 47 countries during the 2009-2010 H1N1 swine flu pandemic. Because it contains an adjuvant, or booster, it was not used in the United States because drug regulators there are wary of adjuvanted vaccines.

GSK says 795 people across Europe have reported developing narcolepsy since the vaccine’s use began in 2009.

Questions about how the narcolepsy cases are linked to Pandemrix, what the triggers and biological mechanisms might have been, and whether there might be a genetic susceptibility are currently the subject of deep scientific investigation.

But experts on all sides are wary. Rare adverse reactions can swiftly develop into “vaccine scares” that spiral out of proportion and cast what one of Europe’s top flu experts calls a “long shadow” over public confidence in vaccines that control potential killers like measles and polio.

“No-one wants to be the next Wakefield,” said Mignot, referring to the now discredited British doctor Andrew Wakefield who sparked a decades-long backlash against the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) shot with false claims of links to autism.

With the narcolepsy studies, there is no suggestion that the findings are the work of one rogue doctor.

Independent teams of scientists have published peer-reviewed studies from Sweden, Finland and Ireland showing the risk of developing narcolepsy after the 2009-2010 immunization campaign was between seven and 13 times higher for children who had Pandemrix than for their unvaccinated peers.

“We really do want to get to the bottom of this. It’s not in anyone’s interests if there is a safety issue that needs to be addressed,” said GSK’s Begg.

LIFE CHANGED

Emelie’s parents, Charles and Marie Olsson, say she was a top student who loved playing the piano, taking tennis lessons, creating art and having fun with friends. But her life started to change in early 2010, a few months after she had Pandemrix. In the spring of 2010, they noticed she was often tired, needing to sleep when she came home from school.

But it wasn’t until May, when she began collapsing at school, that it became clear something serious was happening.

As well as the life-limiting bouts of daytime sleepiness, narcolepsy brings nightmares, hallucinations, sleep paralysis and episodes of cataplexy – when strong emotions trigger a sudden and dramatic loss of muscle strength.

In Emelie’s case, having fun is the emotional trigger. “I can’t laugh or joke about with my friends anymore, because when I do I get cataplexies and collapse,” she said in an interview at her home in the Swedish capital.

Narcolepsy is estimated to affect between 200 and 500 people per million and is a lifelong condition. It has no known cure and scientists don’t really know what causes it. But they do know patients have a deficit of a brain neurotransmitter called orexin, also known as hypocretin, which regulates wakefulness.

Research has found that some people are born with a variant in a gene known as HLA that means they have low hypocretin, making them more susceptible to narcolepsy. Around 25 percent of Europeans are thought to have this genetic vulnerability.

When results of Emelie’s hypocretin test came back in November last year, it showed she had 15 percent of the normal amount, typical of heavy narcolepsy with cataplexy.

The seriousness of her strange new illness has forced her to contemplate life far more than many other young teens: “In the beginning I didn’t really want to live any more, but now I have learned to handle things better,” she said.

TRIGGERS?

Scientists investigating these cases are looking in detail at Pandemrix’s adjuvant, called AS03, for clues.

Some suggest AS03, or maybe its boosting effect, or even the H1N1 flu itself, may have triggered the onset of narcolepsy in those who have the susceptible HLA gene variant.

Angus Nicoll, a flu expert at the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), says genes may well play a part, but don’t tell the whole story.

“Yes, there’s a genetic predisposition to this condition, but that alone cannot explain these cases,” he said. “There was also something to do with receiving this specific vaccination. Whether it was the vaccine plus the genetic disposition alone or a third factor as well – like another infection – we simply do not know yet.”

GSK is funding a study in Canada, where its adjuvanted vaccine Arepanrix, similar to Pandemrix, was used during the 2009-2010 pandemic. The study won’t be completed until 2014, and some experts fear it may not shed much light since the vaccines were similar but not precisely the same.

It all leaves this investigation with far more questions than answers, and a lot more research ahead.

WAS IT WORTH IT?

In his glass-topped office building overlooking the Maria Magdalena church in Stockholm, Goran Stiernstedt, a doctor turned public health official, has spent many difficult hours going over what happened in his country during the swine flu pandemic, wondering if things should have been different.

“The big question is was it worth it? And retrospectively I have to say it was not,” he told Reuters in an interview.

Being a wealthy country, Sweden was at the front of the queue for pandemic vaccines. It got Pandemrix from GSK almost as soon as it was available, and a nationwide campaign got uptake of the vaccine to 59 percent, meaning around 5 million people got the shot.

Stiernstedt, director for health and social care at the Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions, helped coordinate the vaccination campaign across Sweden’s 21 regions.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says the 2009-2010 pandemic killed 18,500 people, although a study last year said that total might be up to 15 times higher.

While estimates vary, Stiernstedt says Sweden’s mass vaccination saved between 30 and 60 people from swine flu death. Yet since the pandemic ended, more than 200 cases of narcolepsy have been reported in Sweden.

With hindsight, this risk-benefit balance is unacceptable. “This is a medical tragedy,” he said. “Hundreds of young people have had their lives almost destroyed.”

PANDEMICS ARE EMERGENCIES

Yet the problem with risk-benefit analyses is that they often look radically different when the world is facing a pandemic with the potential to wipe out millions than they do when it has emerged relatively unscathed from one, like H1N1, which turned out to be much milder than first feared.

David Salisbury, the British government’s director of immunization, says “therein lies the risk, and the difficulty, of working in public health” when a viral emergency hits.

“In the event of a severe pandemic, the risk of death is far higher than the risk of narcolepsy,” he told Reuters. “If we spent longer developing and testing the vaccine on very large numbers of people and waited to see whether any of them developed narcolepsy, much of the population might be dead.”

Pandemrix was authorized by European drug regulators using a so-called “mock-up procedure” that allows a vaccine to be authorized ahead of a possible pandemic using another flu strain. In Pandemrix’s case, the substitute was H5N1 bird flu.

When the WHO declared a pandemic, GSK replaced the mock-up’s strain with the pandemic-causing H1N1 strain to form Pandemrix.

GSK says the final H1N1 version was tested in trials involving around 3,600 patients, including children, adolescents, adults and the elderly, before it was rolled out.

The ECDC’s Nicoll says early warning systems that give a more accurate analysis of a flu strain’s threat are the best way to minimize risks of this kind of tragedy happening in future.

Salisbury agrees, and says progress towards a universal flu vaccine – one that wouldn’t need last-minute changes made when a new strain emerged – would cuts risks further.

“Ideally, we would have a better vaccine that would work against all strains of influenza and we wouldn’t need to worry about this ever again,” he said. “But that’s a long way off.”

With scientists facing years of investigation and research, Emelie just wants to make the best of her life.

She reluctantly accepts that to do so, she needs a cocktail of drugs to try to control the narcolepsy symptoms. The stimulant Ritalin and the sleeping pill Sobril are prescribed for Emelie’s daytime sleepiness and night terrors. Then there’s Prozac to try to stabilize her and limit her cataplexies.

“That’s one of the things that makes me feel most uncomfortable,” she explains. “Before I got this condition I didn’t take any pills, and now I have to take lots – maybe for the rest of my life. It’s not good to take so many medicines, especially when you know they have side effects.”

(Reporting by Kate Kelland; Editing by Will Waterman)

http://news.yahoo.com/insight-evidence-grows-narcolepsy-gsk-swine-flu-shot-070212916–finance.html

 

Autism May Be Caused By An Immune System Response To Measles: Only Autistic Children Had Brain Autoantibodies

Re-Posted at Request 1998 Study..I hope this helps

Contact: Nancy Ross-Flanigan rossflan@umich.edu 734-647-1853 University of Michigan

Autism May Be Caused By An Immune System Response To A Virus

ANN ARBOR—Antibodies found in the blood of autistic children suggest that at least some cases of autism are caused by a misguided immune response, triggered by exposure to a virus, researchers in the University of Michigan’s College of Pharmacy report.

The researchers found that autistic children who had been exposed to certain viruses in the past showed unusually high levels of antibodies to brain proteins, suggesting an autoimmune response.  Their findings appear in the October issue of the peer-reviewed journal, Clinical Immunology and Immunopathology.

Autism is a developmental disorder that affects brain function, interfering with reasoning ability, imagination, communication, and social interaction.  Children with autism start talking later than other children, and when they do speak, their communication skills are extremely limited.  They often avoid looking at other people and don’t learn to read others’ faces for signs of emotion or other cues.  These children typically are unable to play creatively, and some engage in repetitive, sometimes self-destructive, behavior, such as rocking, hand flapping or head-banging.

No single cause of autism has been found, and researchers believe that genes and environmental factors (such as viruses or chemicals) both may contribute.  The kinds of brain abnormalities found in people with autism suggest that the disorder arises when something disrupts normal brain development.

One possibility is that early exposure to a virus prods the body into mounting an immune response that somehow goes awry.  In addition to producing antibodies against the virus, the body makes antibodies against itself, resulting in damage to tissues and organs.

This “autoimmune” response is what happens in autoimmune diseases such as lupus, and some researchers think a similar response may account for the brain abnormalities found in people with autism.

It was this possibility that U-M researchers Vijendra Singh and Victor Yang and undergraduate student assistant Sheren Lin investigated.  In their study of 48 autistic children and 34 normal children and adults, the researchers measured levels of antibodies to two viruses—measles virus and human herpesvirus-6—in the subjects’ blood.  These antibodies were chosen because they are often used in research on known autoimmune diseases, says Singh, the principal investigator of the project and an assistant research scientist in the College of Pharmacy.

The researchers also measured levels of two brain autoantibodies (antibodies to brain tissue).  One, anti-MBP, is an antibody to myelin basic protein, a protein found in the protective sheaths around nerve fibers in the brain.  The other, anti-NAFP, is an antibody to neuron-axon filament protein, a protein that makes up the nerve fibers themselves.

Virus antibody levels were essentially the same in autistic and non-autistic subjects, as the researchers expected.  But the majority of autistic children who had virus antibodies also had brain autoantibodies.  The higher the level of virus antibodies, the more likely an autistic child was to have brain autoantibodies.  None of the non-autistic subjects had brain autoantibodies.

The strongest link found in the autistic children was between measles virus antibodies and anti-MBP, suggesting that exposure to the measles virus may trigger an autoimmune response that interferes with the development of myelin, says Singh.  If myelin in the brain doesn’t develop properly, nerve fibers won’t work as they should.  This could be one way that the brain abnormalities associated with autism arise.

The question of how exposure to measles virus occurs raises a controversial issue.  Parents of children with autism often report that the children started showing signs of the disorder shortly after being immunized with measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) or diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) vaccine, but no scientific studies have shown a link between vaccines and autism.  In the U-M study, almost all the subjects had had MMR immunizations, and none had ever had a case of measles.  It is possible, however, that some might have been infected with measles virus but never developed symptoms of measles, says Singh.

###Contact:  Nancy Ross-Flanigan University of Michigan 412 Maynard St. Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1399 Phone:  (734) 647-1853 rossflan@umich.edu

‘MMR vaccine causes autism’ claim banned – Followed by 15 studies that link Strong Correlation, it May

By

8:34AM BST 08 Aug 2012

Babyjabs.co.uk said the vaccine “could be causing autism in up to 10% of   autistic children in the UK”. It also said: “Most experts now agree that the   large rise (in autism) has been caused partly by increased diagnosis, but   also by a real increase in the number of children with autism.”

A further claim said the vaccine-strain measles virus has been found in the   gut and brain of some autistic children, which supports many parents’ belief   that the MMR vaccine caused autism in their children.

One person complained that the claims are misleading and unsubstantiated.

Defending the claims, Babyjabs referred to one study in particular from 2002,   which it considered to be one of the strongest pieces of evidence that the   MMR vaccine does not cause autism but which it claimed includes the lead   author’s conclusion: “We cannot rule out the existence of a susceptible   subgroup with an increased risk of autism if vaccinated.”

It also said The Truth About Vaccines, a book written by Babyjabs medical   director Dr Richard Halvorsen, stated: “If one in 800 MMR vaccinations   triggered an autistic disorder, this would result in around 1,200 children a   year in the UK being made autistic by the bundling of the vaccines. This is   probably the worst case scenario.”

Dr Halvorsen added that “research, including large population studies, has   since shown that the MMR is not causing the large majority of autism, but   has been unable to exclude the possibility that it is causing autism in a   small number of susceptible children”.

Upholding the complaint, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) noted that   the website makes clear that the original allegations of a link between the   MMR vaccine and autism by Andrew Wakefield was “strongly rejected” by   government and the medical establishment”.

But it said consumers are likely to infer from the website’s claims that the   vaccine might have played a role in the “increase” in the number of children   with autism.

The ASA said: “We understood that the position held by the World Health   Organisation and the Department of Health was that no evidence existed of a   causal association between the MMR vaccine and autism or autistic disorders,   and that the Cochrane review, looking at the general evidence available,   could find no significant association between MMR immunisation and autism.

“We noted that the evidence provided by the advertiser included studies and an   article which looked at the increased prevalence of autism, but did not   include evidence that any increase was due to the MMR vaccine.”

It ruled that the claims must not appear again in their current form

 

Now for the Correlating studies in Support of Neurlogical Damage: With thanks to Gaia Health and The refusers…This is the counter argumant

 

Viral/Immune studies:

Abnormal measles-mumps-rubella antibodies and CNS autoimmunity in children with autism.

Autoimmunity to the central nervous system (CNS), especially to myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a causal role in  autism, a neurodevelopmental disorder. Because many autistic children harbor elevated levels of measles antibodies, we conducted a serological study of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and MBP autoantibodies.

….over 90% of MMR antibody-positive autistic sera were also positive for MBP autoantibodies, suggesting a strong association between MMR and CNS autoimmunity in autism. Stemming from this evidence, we suggest that an inappropriate antibody response to MMR, specifically the measles component thereof, might be related to pathogenesis of autism.

Serological association of measles virus and human herpes virus-6 with brain auto-antibodies in autism.

This study is the first to report an association between virus serology and brain autoantibody in autism; it supports the  hypothesis that a virus-induced autoimmune response may play a causal role in autism.

Hypothesis: conjugate vaccines may predispose children to autism spectrum disorders.

Conjugate vaccines fundamentally change the manner in which the immune systems of infants and young children function by deviating their immune responses to the targeted carbohydrate antigens from a state of hypo-responsiveness to a robust B2 B cell mediated response.

This period of hypo-responsiveness to carbohydrate antigens coincides with the intense myelination process in infants and young children, and conjugate vaccines may have disrupted evolutionary forces that favored early brain development over the need to protect infants and young children from capsular bacteria.

Effects of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis or tetanus vaccination on allergies and allergy-related respiratory symptoms among children and adolescents in the United States.

The odds of having a history of asthma was twice as great among vaccinated subjects than among unvaccinated subjects The odds of having had any allergy-related respiratory symptom in the past 12 months was 63% greater among vaccinated subjects than unvaccinated subjects The associations between vaccination and subsequent allergies and symptoms were greatest among children aged 5 through 10 years.

Neurological Complications of Pertussis Immunization

Review is made of 107 cases of neurological complications of pertussis inoculation reported in the literature. The early onset of neurological symptoms was characteristic, with changes of consciousness and convulsions as the most striking features. The question of aetiology is considered and contraindications are discussed….as is the grave danger of further inoculations when a previous one has produced any suggestion of a neurological reaction.

Hepatitis B vaccination of male neonates and autism diagnosis, NHIS 1997-2002.

Findings suggest that U.S. male neonates vaccinated with the hepatitis B vaccine prior to 1999 (from vaccination record) had a threefold higher risk for parental report of autism diagnosis compared to boys not vaccinated as neonates during that same time period. Nonwhite boys bore a greater risk.

Aluminum Studies:

Do aluminum vaccine adjuvants contribute to the rising prevalence of autism?

Our results show that: (i) children from countries with the highest ASD prevalence appear to have the highest exposure to Al from vaccines; (ii) the increase in exposure to Al adjuvants significantly correlates with the increase in ASD prevalence in the United States observed over the last two decades;

and (iii) a significant correlation exists between the amounts of Al administered to preschool children and the current prevalence of ASD in seven Western countries, particularly at 3-4 months of age.

Aluminum hydroxide injections lead to motor deficits and motor neuron degeneration.

…A second series of experiments was conducted on mice injected with six doses of aluminum hydroxide. Behavioural analyses in these mice revealed significant impairments in a number of motor functions as well as diminished spatial memory capacity.

Aluminum Vaccine Adjuvants: Are they Safe?

Experimental research, clearly shows that aluminum adjuvants have a potential to induce serious immunological disorders in humans. In particular, aluminum in adjuvant form carries a risk for autoimmunity, long-term brain inflammation and associated neurological complications and may thus have profound and widespread adverse health consequences. click for entire study

Thimerosal studies:

Integrating experimental (in vitro and in vivo) neurotoxicity studies of low-dose thimerosal relevant to vaccines.

There is a need to interpret neurotoxic studies to help deal with uncertainties surrounding pregnant mothers, newborns and young children who must receive repeated doses of Thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs).

Information extracted from studies indicates that: (a) activity of low doses of Thimerosal against isolated human and animal brain cells was found in all studies and is consistent with Hg neurotoxicity; (b) the neurotoxic effect of ethylmercury has not been studied with co-occurring adjuvant-Al in TCVs; (c) animal studies have shown that exposure to Thimerosal-Hg can lead to accumulation of inorganic Hg in brain, and that (d) doses relevant to TCV exposure possess the potential to affect human neuro-development.

Neurodevelopmental disorders following thimerosal-containing childhood immunizations: a follow-up analysis.

“The present study provides additional epidemiological evidence supporting previous epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence that administration of thimerosal-containing vaccines in the United States resulted in a significant number of children developing NDs.”

Neonatal administration of thimerosal causes persistent changes in mu opioid receptors in the rat brain

“These data document that exposure to thimerosal during early postnatal life produces lasting alterations in the densities of brain opioid receptors along with other neuropathological changes, which may disturb brain development.”

Persistent behavioral impairments and alterations of brain dopamine system after early postnatal administration of thimerosal in rats.

“These data document that early postnatal THIM administration causes lasting neurobehavioral impairments and neurochemical alterations in the brain, dependent on dose and sex. If similar changes occur in THIM/mercurial-exposed children, they could contribute do neurodevelopmental disorders.”

Maternal Thimerosal Exposure Results in Aberrant Cerebellar Oxidative Stress, Thyroid Hormone Metabolism, and Motor Behavior in Rat Pups; Sex- and Strain-Dependent Effects.

Thimerisol exposure also resulted in a significant increase in cerebellar levels of the oxidative stress marker 3-nitrotyrosine…. This coincided with an increased (47.0%) expression of a gene negatively regulated by T3,… Our data  thus demonstrate a negative neurodevelopmental impact of perinatal thimerisol exposure.

Administration of thimerosal to infant rats increases overflow of glutamate and aspartate in the prefrontal cortex: protective role of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate.

Thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders. We previously showed that its administration to infant rats causes behavioral, neurochemical and neuropathological abnormalities similar to those present in autism.

#16, Extra Credit:

Influenza Vaccination during Pregnancy

The ACIP’s recommendation of influenza vaccination during pregnancy is not supported by citations in its own policy paper or in current medical literature. Considering the potential risks of maternal and fetal mercury exposure, the administration of thimerosal during pregnancy is both unjustified and unwise.

Also, take note of the 71 references at the end of this study