Survival rates for people suffering from heart failure have not improved since 1998

Public Release: 30-Jan-2017 Heart failure survival rates show no improvement Oxford University Press USA Survival rates for people suffering from heart failure have not improved since 1998, according to a study led by University of Oxford researchers. Published in Family Practice, the research was funded by the United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health Research School…

Currently approved TB vaccine is now only about 20% effective at best, researchers examining new candidates

Public Release: 28-Jul-2016 Toward an effective TB vaccine: Analysis of the immune response to a promising candidate PLOS IMAGE: This is a scanning electron micrograph of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, which cause tuberculosis. Credit: NIAID BCG, the only currently approved TB vaccine, has been around for almost a century and is only partially effective. When given…

Statins ‘may be a waste of time for the over-60s’: Row over controversial report that says there is no link between ‘bad cholesterol’ and heart disease

Academics and cardiologists from 17 countries reviewed 19 previous studies, involving 68,000 people. For decades doctors have prescribed statins to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes caused by ‘bad’ cholesterol in the blood But now a team of scientists say taking the pills may be a waste of time They found no link…

The Lancet: Most antidepressant drugs ineffective for children and teens, according to study

Public Release: 8-Jun-2016   But authors warn that lack of available data from published and unpublished trials leads to great uncertainty around true effects The Lancet Most available antidepressants are ineffective, and some may be unsafe, for children and teenagers with major depression, according to the most comprehensive comparison of commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs so…

Pharma Firms may of got caught manipulating data, resulting in agony and profit ?

“misleading marketing caused some lung-cancer patients “to die earlier and faster, with more pain.”  “This settlement, however, allows the company to avoid the burden, disruption, cost and distraction of protracted civil litigation and to focus instead on our business of developing medicines that extend and improve human lives.” Pharma Firms Reach $67M Deal With Feds…

Acid reflux misdiagnosed 90% of the time in babies

Public Release: 2-May-2016 Even doctors get confused about reflux disease in babies New study shows that clinical symptoms are only rarely validated by the gold-standard reflux test Thomas Jefferson University (PHILADELPHIA) – Millions of Americans currently use medication for their indigestion and reflux, so it may come as no surprise that parents and doctors also…

Traditional skin tests used to predict allergies to antibiotics are useless say Montreal researchers

Public Release: 7-Apr-2016   McGill University Health Centre Montreal, April 7 2016– Skin tests traditionally used to predict allergies to amoxicillin, one of the most commonly prescribed antibiotics in children, are ineffective according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal. The…

Benzodiazepines ineffective in treating anxiety disorders and may increase dementia risk

Public Release: 5-Oct-2015   Osteopathic psychiatrists encourage patients to review treatment options to improve outcomes and reduce risks American Osteopathic Association Patients taking benzodiazepines to treat psychiatric conditions should consider transitioning to other therapies because of heightened risks for dementia and death, according to clinicians from the American College of Osteopathic Neurologists and Psychiatrists. Benzodiazepines…

Benzodiazepines not recommended for patients with PTSD or recent trauma

Public Release: 14-Jul-2015 Wolters Kluwer Health July 14, 2015 – Benzodiazepine drugs are widely used in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but available evidence suggests that they are not effective–and may even be harmful, concludes a systematic review and meta-analysis in the July Journal of Psychiatric Practice. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.…

Mammography benefits overestimated

Public Release: 7-Jul-2015 King’s College London An in-depth review of randomised trials on screening for breast, colorectal, cervical, prostate and lung cancers, published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, shows that the benefits of mammographic screening are likely to have been overestimated. This overestimation results from the use of an unconventional statistical…

Study: Severe asthma fails to respond to mainstay treatment

Public Release: 29-Jun-2015 University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences PITTSBURGH, June 29, 2015 – The immune response that occurs in patients with severe asthma is markedly different than what occurs in milder forms of the lung condition, according to researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Those unique features could point…

Noted urologist calls attention to implications of flawed prostate specific antigen data in SEER

Public Release: 18-May-2015 Editorial in The Journal of Urology® warns of impact on previous research results Elsevier Health Sciences New York, NY, May 18, 2015 — The National Cancer Institute (NCI) recently announced that it had removed all prostate specific antigen (PSA) data from the SEER (Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results) and SEER-Medicare programs. The…