Hacking your BRAIN: Scientists reveal they can find out your pin number, and even where you live – all using a cheap headset

Technique  uses a freely available headset often used to control games Researchers  used it to watch for numbers a person recognised, which triggered a spike in a  certain type of brain activity Say it  could be used by police to interrogate  suspects   By Mark Prigg PUBLISHED:06:45 EST, 27  August 2012| UPDATED:15:01 EST, 27 August…

Site appeals against court request to hand over details of tweets relating to Occupy activist charged with disorderly conduct

By Dominic Rushe, The Guardian Monday, August 27, 2012 16:19 EDT Twitter has lodged an appeal against a New York judge’s decision that it must hand over detailed information related to an Occupy Wall Street protester charged with disorderly conduct. In July, Twitter was ordered to hand over almost three months’ worth of messages and…

Republican party platform to target ‘hardcore’ porn

By Arturo Garcia Monday, August 27, 2012 13:50 EDT Despite their presumptive presidential candidate being endorsed by a porn star, a conservative media watchdog group says the Republican party platform will look to get tough on what it calls “the scourge of hardcore pornography.” “A change in the Republican Party Platform to target illegal adult…

Study shows link between morbid obesity, low IQ in toddlers

Contact: April Frawley Birdwell afrawley@vpha.health.ufl.edu 352-273-5817 University of Florida GAINESVILLE, Fla. – University of Florida researchers have discovered a link between morbid obesity in toddlers and lower IQ scores, cognitive delays and brain lesions similar to those seen in Alzheimer’s disease patients, a new study shows. Although the cause of these cognitive impairments is still…

Prenatal pesticide exposure tied to lower IQ in children

Contact: Sarah Yang scyang@berkeley.edu 510-643-7741 University of California – Berkeley Berkeley – In a new study suggesting pesticides may be associated with the health and development of children, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley’s School of Public Health have found that prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides – widely used on food crops – is…

Surprising finding that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) produce too little airway mucus – rather than too much..Common Medical Belief is Wrong

Shannon Koontz 336-716-4587 shkoontz@wfubmc.edu Bob Conn 336-716-4587 rconn@wfubmc.edu Mark Wright 336-716-4587 mwright@wfubmc.edu Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Surprising finding could lead to new treatment for cystic fibrosis WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – The surprising finding that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) produce too little airway mucus – rather than too much, as it commonly believed –…

Cannabis smoking ‘permanently lowers IQ’

Teenagers who regularly smoke cannabis are putting themselves at risk of permanently damaging their intelligence, according to a landmark study By Stephen Adams, Medical Correspondent Researchers found persistent users of the drug, who started smoking it at   school, had lower IQ scores as adults. They were also significantly more likely to have attention and memory…

Robertson: Raise retirement age to 72 because ‘people really like to work’

Evangelist Pat Robertson weighed in the issue of Social Security’s long-term feasibility on The 700 Club Monday, advocating for the mandatory retirement age to be raised past 65 years of age, citing extended lifespans and advances in medicine. “Consequently [people] should be working longer and they should not begin retirement at age 65 or 66,”…

Johns Hopkins team finds ICU misdiagnoses may account for as many annual deaths as breast cancer

Armstrong Institute researchers discover missed medical conditions in more than 1 in 4 critically ill adults Each year as many as 40,500 critically ill U.S. hospital patients die with an unknown medical condition that may have caused or contributed to their death, Johns Hopkins patient safety experts report in a recent study. In a discussion…

Vitamin B3 ( NIacin ) may offer new tool in fight against ‘superbugs’ – increased by 1,000 times the ability of immune cells to kill staph bacteria

Contact: Adrian Gombart adrian.gombart@oregonstate.edu 541-737-8018 Oregon State University CORVALLIS, Ore. – A new study suggests that nicotinamide, more commonly known as vitamin B3, may be able to combat some of the antibiotic-resistance staph infections that are increasingly common around the world, have killed thousands and can pose a significant threat to public health. The research…

Precise and persistent cell sabotage

  Contact: Kevin Mayhood kevin.mayhood@case.edu 216-534-7183 Case Western Reserve University   Control of siRNA could aid regenerative medicine, cancer therapy Some of the body’s own genetic material, known as small interfering RNA (siRNA), can be packaged then unleashed as a precise and persistent technology to guide cell behavior, researchers at Case Western Reserve University report…

Merging tissue and electronics

For Immediate Release:August 27, 2012 contact: Sarah McDonnell, MIT News Office email: s_mcd@mit.edu phone: 617-253-8923       New tissue scaffold could be used for drug development and implantable therapeutic devices. CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — To control the three-dimensional shape of engineered tissue, researchers grow cells on tiny, sponge-like scaffolds. These devices can be implanted into patients or…